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DIY Trauma Kit for the Hunter-suggestions?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by mainenotary, Nov 24, 2012.

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  1. mainenotary

    mainenotary Member

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    It is just about the end of rifle season here in Maine for us deer hunters, And as I am I am putting away my gear, I have been pondering some upgrades. During this reevaluation, I have found that my first aid kit is a little lacking. I was hoping to solicit some opinions from those here that are EMTs/paramedics.

    I am looking to beef up my standard FAK to a simplified Trauma Kit specifically geared to hunters, ie: possibility of gun shot wounds, serious lacerations etc. What would you suggest?
     
  2. todayshighlights

    todayshighlights Member

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    I am a volunteer firefighter and paid pharmacist, this is what my kit looks like.

    1 box 4X4 inch gauze, 2 packs rolled gauze, 1 dispenser latex free tape, 1 ACE bandage, 2 ounce bottle of 1/2 strength hydrogen peroxide, 1 whistle/compas tool, 1 swiss army knife, 2 bottles of water, FULLY CHARGED cell phone.

    That will get me back to my truck under most circumstances, if not that FULLY CHARGED cell phone can get me help.

    Most 911 services can triangulate a cell call to give first responders a good location on the caller. Having enough battery life to interact with 911 and emergency personnel is very helpful to getting the lost person out of the woods quickly. Also if you are able to find your own way back to your camp/car, call 911 and tell then you are okay. Rant over.

    Be safe.
     
  3. Texan Scott

    Texan Scott Member

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    Get your American Red Cross training certification (or update/ upgrade it) and look at the kits they offer.
     
  4. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    I'm a retired dentist who has hemophilia, a clotting disorder. I always carry ibuprofen, 4x4's all gauze (not cotton-filled), hemostats, a suture kit, novacaine with a syringe and a roll of electrical tape. I have stopped serious bleeding many times with this kit and actually had to sew myself up twice (it's real easy with the novacaine ;) ).
     
  5. 6.5x55swedish

    6.5x55swedish Member

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    I have a Family member who had a tree stand break and he fell about 20 ft. He landed on his rifle breaking his back as well as his ankle. He had a cell phone with him, but went into shock and was unable to use it. He did manage to crawl (we assume because he can't remember) back to his truck and drove him self to the hospital. Spent 6 months in a body brace. Luckily no long term injury and he is back out hunting every season... Just not from trees anymore.
     
  6. Buzznrose

    Buzznrose Member

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    Last edited: Nov 24, 2012
  7. Birdhunter1

    Birdhunter1 Member

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    Patocazador, my 4 year old son also has hemophilia. Granted he's only 4 but we typically always have an ace wrap and a few gauze pads of some sorts around. Odd with a clotting disorder that you would carry ibuprofen being that it thins your blood.
     
  8. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    http://www.thegpsstore.com/ACR-2880...n-P2719.aspx?gclid=CK-1h6qa6bMCFQeDnQod-zIA5g

    http://www.rei.com/product/840417/delorme-inreach-2-way-satellite-communicator-for-apple-ios-and-android?preferredSku=8404170001&cm_mmc=cse_froogle-_-pla-_-product-_-8404170001&mr:trackingCode=AF7B53AE-3AA4-E111-8DC4-001B21631C34&mr:referralID=NA&mr:adType=pla&{copy:s_kwcid}=&gclid=CNuGwLua6bMCFQeDnQod-zIA5g

    I've taken a variety of first aid and GSW care courses and until I completed the Wilderness First Aid course I really didn't have a solid grasp of what constitutes a serious injury in the backcountry. The WFA is an eyeopener for even front country EMS that participated in the session I took. For every mile you are off the road you add hours to the time it will take to get you to an ambulance and standard assumptions about care and first aid change radically. What would otherwise be considered a serious, but not life threatening injury in the parking lot or along the edge of the road becomes much more serious on the trail. The first thing I would recommend is a rescue beacon and a sat phone followed by the WFA course (or probably the WFA first).

    If nothing else sign up for the SOLO Wilderness Medical blog and newsletter and you'll begin to have a chance to see what you need.

    The most catastrophic injury is a GSW or head/neck/spinal injury from a fall. Closely followed would be shock or allergic reaction to a sting or compound fracture of the femur. The most common injures are sprains or broken ankles and these can keep you from getting out all by yourself.
     
  9. Miata Mike

    Miata Mike Member

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    My hunting partner fell 12 to 14 feet while climbing on to his deer stand early this am. He is pretty busted up and lucky to be alive. Very good thing he called on the radio one time, He didn't answer until I texted him five minutes later.

    They had to reset a dislocated hip twice. 4 cracked ribs, and a cracked bone in his ankle that they think they might have to pin. Bone chip missing from hip socket too. I had to find a trailer early this morning to haul him out to the highway for the ambulance. He is spending the night at the hospital.

    The trailer is the only way to get him out the quarter mile to the driveway.

    Not the way I hoped to spend my last day of hunting this year.
     
  10. Mamertine

    Mamertine Member

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    I think Todayshighlights has a good list (+1 on the cell phone). I have a quickclot package in my kit although I'm not sure how well it works, and some butterfly closure strips.

    Also Texas Scott got it right good training is better than any kit IMO.
     
  11. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    If its just you...super glue and something that you can take a look at yourself with. "scope dope" is more likely than most and you look silly getting back to camp with blood running down your face.
     
  12. sixgunner455

    sixgunner455 Member

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    Mamertine - quickclot works very well, but it is not applicable to every injury. Reserve it for the worst case situations - bleeders you can't stop, usually from gunshots, severe blade injuries, etc.

    I carry a pound of it to the range, and in my hiking/hunting kit, along with compression bandages and several other things.
     
  13. Tim the student

    Tim the student Member

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    Training first - then figure out the gear.

    A lot of training. Not necessarily on "high speed" stuff - but a lot of practice and repetition on various parts of the body.

    The very basics are fundamental - and they need to be very, very sound.
     
  14. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    Birdhunter,

    I am not a full-blown hemophiliac .. sometimes I test normal. Ibuprofen stops pain (for me) that acetaminophen doesn't touch. My blood clots after awhile (5-10 min.) but it's real easy to get the wound bleeding again. On deep wounds and surgery the bleeding usual resumes spontaneously about 3 days later. That's why I suture deeper wounds rather than bind them.
    Is your son's hemophilia hereditary?
     
  15. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

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    Among all other common first aid gear mentioned, I always make sure I have a couple of tampons, yes that's right tampons. A bad GSW can be very difficult to stop the bleeding, which is where the tampon comes in handy. They induce clotting and can be inserted into the wound cavity, depending on how bad the wound is of course. I also carry a suture kit to close up a serious cut with.

    GS
     
  16. joecil

    joecil Member

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    Another thing to add is Maxpads. They are sterile and highly absorbent making a great bandage in a pinch. The are also cheaper than some gauze pads packages out there.
     
  17. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

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    However much tape you have in your kit is not enough.
    Look at your current supply, and triple it. At least.

    The Israeli pressure bandage will handle most survivable lacerations or gunshot wounds, and will definitely do a better job than smooshing feminine hygiene products into a wound. :scrutiny:

    If you are a dude, and you are considering doing something weird - like laying in a supply of tampons and maxi-pads - please reconsider. Use a proper bandage and dressing.
    Israeli pressure bandage video
     
  18. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    Pressure stops bleeding not absorbancy. An absorbent pad would wick the blood to the pad rather than hasten clotting.
     
  19. Tim the student

    Tim the student Member

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    For you guys who have used both ACE wraps and Kerlix as well as the Israeli, what do you prefer? I'm partial to ACE wraps and Kerlix myself.

    Whatever you use, please train with it. A lot. The gear hasn't advanced to the point to where all you have to do is have it with you, and it will take care of the rest. You still need to be able to use it - very likely when your blood pressure and heart rate are pretty high, you may be tired, and you are probably nervous because you may not have treated or even seen anyone with a serious injury before. Sometimes good enough, isn't.

    Don't forget to prep your stuff, too (folding tape back on itself so you can easily get it going, using tape to make little handles on petroleum gauze so you can open them easier, taking ACE wraps out of their plastic wrap, packing lifesaving stuff to be the most accessible etc etc.)
     
  20. Hermosabeach

    Hermosabeach Member

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    I agree with an earlier poster-
    Training first- gear second

    Israeli style pressure bandages
    Quick clot gauze - it now has a starch in it that helps clotting. Also good for packing into a wound.
    Tourniquet - you can bleed out from a rifle shot to the leg in 90 seconds
    Ace bandages-curlex for pressure wrapping

    Most people have two kits- one for owies - one for major issues

    If you are hunting with family / friends you know- gloves are not as big of a deal if you know your group does not have HIV/ hep, etc

    In good courses they will let you practice with different gear. Learn from them what might work for your needs
     
  21. panhead58ak

    panhead58ak Member

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    I grew up in Fairbanks Alaska and most of the time a half hour ride in a supercub put me out of cell phone coverage a good trip plan and self reliance were a must you didnt go out with out someone knowing where you were going and when they should expect you back.
     
  22. Sav .250

    Sav .250 Member

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    First order of business,make sure your cell phone is fully charged before every outing.
    Them comes the other stuff.
     
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