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Do any members keep a dedicated suppressor on their primary home defense weapon?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by mbdolfin, Jul 7, 2008.

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  1. mbdolfin

    mbdolfin Member

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    Do any members keep a dedicated suppressor on their primary home defense weapon?
     
  2. waterhouse

    waterhouse Member

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    Primary? No, it's a 12 gauge.

    I do have one on my bedside handgun.
     
  3. Kind of Blued

    Kind of Blued Member

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    No, but I would like one.
     
  4. EHCRain10

    EHCRain10 Member

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    What are the legal ramifications of using a suppressed weapon in home defense?

    there are some great advantages to them but what are the disadvantages?
     
  5. PTK

    PTK Member

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    Yep, my AR-15 has a M4-1000 from AAC on it. If I have to fire that thing indoors at night, I'll still be able to see/hear afterward.

    [​IMG]



    (The crowbar is for zombies.)
     

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  6. MGshaggy

    MGshaggy Member

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    If its a good shoot, its a good shoot; doesn't matter if you use grandpop's old SxS 12 ga. or the latest and greatest, uber-tacticool, suppressed weapon. The tool used does not change the justification for using it, and once a response of deadly force is warranted, a suppressor does not make it any more deadly, or less justifiable, than an unsuppressed weapon. Keep in mind, however, that after the authorities arrive it will probably be taken as evidence and unceremoniously tossed around a police evidence locker until the legal dust has completely settled and you get it back weeks or months later.

    The foregoing assumes, however, that everything is legal and properly registered, and there is no state law prohibitions on the possession or use of a suppressed weapon in such a situation.
     
  7. PTK

    PTK Member

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    The police can't easily keep a silencer as evidence, and if they do need to keep it for a while you KNOW you're getting it back - they CANNOT keep an NFA item registered in someone else's name indefinitely, where they can keep giving you the runaround on an ordinary title I firearm.
     
  8. hexidismal

    hexidismal Member

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    I most certainly would keep a dedicated suppressed weapon for home defense. I live in NY though.. so it's a no go.
     
  9. Robert Hairless

    Robert Hairless Member

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    Free advice is seldom cheap.
     
  10. PTK

    PTK Member

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    My signature does tend to be apropos quite often, doesn't it? :D
     
  11. chris in va

    chris in va Member

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    Wonder if they make supressors for an AK. Hmm.
     
  12. psyopspec

    psyopspec Member

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    You'll be able to hear the prosecution's case against you. Seriously though, in a justifiable home defense shooting, you'd probably be fine if you lived in a state where they were legal.
     
  13. bogie

    bogie Member

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    I'm gonna stick one on my bedside .45 after they're okayed here in Missouri - I think that's in August.
     
  14. geekWithA.45

    geekWithA.45 Moderator Emeritus

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    Suppressed for home defense?

    Sure, why not?

    Why wake the kids?
     
  15. ceetee

    ceetee Member

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    A hard-core nitpicker would claim that any alterations you make to the weapon taking it away from "bone-stock" could be used against you. An overzealous prosecutor could make the argument that adding the supressor shows you were more pre-disposed to violence, that it was your intent to use the weapon against human targets, rather than just paper targets. He could also argue that this pre-disposition led you to shoot, choosing the act of killing your opponent first, before opting for any other avenues, such as escape or "less-lethal" means of self defense.

    Depending on the law where you live, that argument (as full of bull as it is) may have merit. Some jurisdictions still have "must retreat" clauses in their self-defense laws. Check with a good lawyer, and have all the legal ramifications explained out to you before firming up your home defense strategies.

    Personally, where I live it would make no difference. If I didn't have a hard time coming up with the cash, I'd have a suppressor on all my weapons.
     
  16. DoubleTapDrew

    DoubleTapDrew Member

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    Seems like a SBR AR-15 with a can would be a great home defense weapon. Short, yet won't make your ears bleed if fired indoors. I've heard arguments about the prosecution painting you as a rambo-type person using a NFA item for home defense but not sure if that's ever happened.
    PTK makes a good point about how the ATF might start breathing down the PD's neck if they tried to hold a NFA item registered to someone else for more than a short time. There have been stories of SOTs using full autos (and probably suppressors) justifiably in defense of their business or home. I don't see why it would be different for an individual.
     
  17. Robert Hairless

    Robert Hairless Member

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    :)

    I suffered hearing loss while I was in the military at a time when ear protection was cigarette filters. So I'm very much in favor of suppressors as a sensible device.

    But "sensible" rarely applies to the reactions of other people where guns and self defense are concerned. It's almost impossible to believe that anyone could be opposed to the concept of a human being wanting to live and be able to keep himself alive, or to keep his wife and children alive. Even so, there are a great many people--including otherwise nice Americans--who are repelled by the thought.

    Some of those people, unfortunately, might be involved when you are inducted as raw material into the criminal justice system. Try telling them "It was a good shoot, and a good shoot is a good shoot, and let's go out for coffee while the biohazard guy cleans up the mess."

    Although I think suppressors make darned good sense, in the minds of many people who watch movies they're associated with assassination. Any day that involves the need to defend one's life is, by definition, not a lucky day. When it goes that wrong why gamble on it suddenly going right?
     
  18. MGshaggy

    MGshaggy Member

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    PTK - they can keep it so long as they need to for evidentiary purposes. If its a clean shoot and they're not going to file charges, that probably won't be very long, but how long does it take to put a nice ding, scrape, or scratch in your can or expensive NFA item? If they do need to keep it for longer, they can easily get a court order to temporarily transfer custody from the registered owner, tax-free, on a F5. Moreover, in a practical sense, who would file charges against the LE agency? I doubt the AUSA is going to take that one up as long as the agency can make a colorable claim its needed as evidence.
     
  19. La Pistoletta

    La Pistoletta Member

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    Ask the jury to stand next to an unsuppressed pistol or rifle being fired indoors, without ear protection.

    They'll understand then.
     
  20. Greywolf

    Greywolf Member

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    I keep one on my SBR 9mm AR. Honestly, though, if I had to use it to defend the home I'd quickly take the suppressor off AFTER the shoot and put the flash hider on it.

    The bad guy won't be able to say anything about the change, and no one in my neighborhood will be the wiser. I live in a concrete block home with good insulation, and my dogs bark very loud. No one here is a sound and ballistics expert, and I'll just say, "What? Could you speak louder?" to the cops when they ask me questions after the shoot.
     
  21. taliv

    taliv Moderator

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    i keep one on my AR15, which i keep by the bed.

    removing the suppressor after the shooting seems like a galactically bad idea.
     
  22. Jorg Nysgerrig

    Jorg Nysgerrig Member

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    I'm with taliv on this one as far as removing the suppressor being a bad idea.
     
  23. LiquidTension

    LiquidTension Member

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    Isn't that what QD mounts are for?
     
  24. Afy

    Afy Member

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    Worried about waking up the neighbours...:neener:
     
  25. NeoSpud

    NeoSpud Member

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    MG- From what I've read, if you ever need to use your firearm in self-defense then you can pretty much guarantee that it'll be confiscated, and being the pessimist/realist that I am, I'm prepared to never see it again. That being said, if I ever have to surrender -perhaps permanently, in a worst case scenario- my handgun and suppressor, I would be somewhat upset, though at the same time I'd be glad that I could still hear.

    I think it would be worth the risk of falling into a scenario that Robert Hairless describes. My hearing -and the hearing of anyone else in my small apartment- are worth that chance.
     
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