Quantcast

Do you believe in "gun break in?"

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Crazy Fingers, Oct 10, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Crazy Fingers

    Crazy Fingers member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2008
    Messages:
    243
    Every gun I ever bought that worked reliably did so right out of the box. No armount of shooting has ever made an unreliable gun into a reliable one, at least in my experience.

    Not that you can't make an unreliable gun into a reliable one by fixing a specific problem. I just don't think shooting it a bunch usually does this.
     
  2. orionengnr

    orionengnr Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Messages:
    5,456
    Not so much "breaking in", but learning whether or not it is trustworthy...
     
  3. p2000sk

    p2000sk Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2007
    Messages:
    358
    Like breaking into a bucket of vanilla ice cream in the grocery store parking lot.
     
  4. browningguy

    browningguy Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Messages:
    4,655
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    I've seen it occasionally on highly accurate pistols. Everything is very tight from the factory, 50-100 rounds usually breaks them in quite well. I have really only seen this on 1911 pattern pistols though.
     
  5. Cuda

    Cuda Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2006
    Messages:
    404
    Location:
    Colorado
    +1

    C
     
  6. Brigrat

    Brigrat Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2003
    Messages:
    306
    Location:
    West Texas
    our organization received about 75 Sig 226's a couple of years ago, and have found that their reliability improved greatly after the first 200 rounds. Out of the box we were having consistent problems, now, only when there is sand involved.
     
  7. lechiffre

    lechiffre Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2007
    Messages:
    473
    i have had two pistols that needed a break in. a browning bdm. it had a few failures to feed with the first magazine,one with the second, then functioned fine. the other was an interarms ppk. multiple failures to feed that got less common over a couple of hundred rounds then no problems. not sure if the 200 rounds broke in the gun or my hand on that one.;)
     
  8. smartshooter.45

    smartshooter.45 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    320
    Location:
    The Great Northwest
    Kimber suggests putting 500 rds through your 1911 before making it your primary carry gun. Kimber manufactures their guns under extremely tight tolerances. out of the box my pro carry 2 just felt a bit "stiff"- mostly the action of the slide. you can manually rack the slide 500 times or so, but the break in rounds also semi polish the feed ramp. you can also just take 800grit paper to the ramp urself. but like the others have said, you can gain some confidence in ur gun and know its not going to fail when u most need it. cheers.
     
  9. tigre

    tigre Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2008
    Messages:
    209
    Location:
    Tampa
    My CZ P01 had a few ftf's in the first couple hundred rounds. It could have been just an ammo issue, but it's been so solid since then I feel like I could feed that thing rocks and it'd still figure out how to fire 'em.
     
  10. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2003
    Messages:
    6,985
    Location:
    Texas
    Most of my guns have been reliable out of the box but a few did need to be shot a bit before they were totally reliable.

    Probably the most recent was a couple years ago.
    I have five Kimbers. All but the Ultra Eclipse II were 100% when new. My Eclipse and two friend's Eclipse weren't totally reliable for the first couple hundred rounds.
     
  11. chieftain

    chieftain Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,264
    Location:
    The Free State of Arizona
    Kahr used to 'require' 200 rounds before it would consider their K9 pistol reliable. The may still have that in their manual.

    Personally I require 1000 rounds, and 200 rounds of the carry load without a single ftf in a pistol. (ftf = failure to fire of any type) All that shooting was NOT required at one sitting.

    I used to require 500 of the carry load. The price of ammo has dissuaded me RE: the 500 of the carry ammo. Some of the gun "pro's" I used to work and hang out with required 1500, 2000, and 2500 rounds with out a single ftf before a weapon was considered reliable enough for service.

    One ftf, and the count begins all over again.

    This is just my way. Each of us must decide this issue for ourselves. Just make sure you do shoot it enough, before you begin to rely on any weapon you and your loved ones lives may have to be trusted with.

    Go figure.

    Fred
     
  12. TAB

    TAB Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    2,475
    Every thing that has parts that are machined to fit toegther will benefit form a break in period. Rather or not you notice it is another matter.

    Example if you rebuild a motor, put it in a car then run drive it like normal, bad things will happen. If you break it in with the proper lubes and procedures. Every thing is golden.
     
  13. Kind of Blued

    Kind of Blued Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Messages:
    3,676
    Location:
    Rocky Mountains
    I didn't until I bought a Kahr PM9.

    I'd rip skin off of my thumb and forefinger locking the slide back... everything was tight as a somethinerather. I read the manual, saw that they recommended 200 rounds for "break in" and got to shooting those 200 as fast as I could without burning myself on the metal parts. :)

    Literally 200 rounds later, the first thing I noticed was how it SOUNDED looser when I'd hit the slide catch and load a round. "Loose" usually means "bad" when it comes to anything mechanical, but the gun just seems alot "healthier" now. The recoil spring is a lot more pleasant and the action is a heck of a lot smoother.

    As far as testing a gun for reliability & "carry worth-ness"... If I had a lot more money, I'd be a lot more meticulous about how well a gun runs before I carry it, but I don't have the resources.

    I now have ~600 rounds through it and the only failure was a failure to feed on about round 20, i.e. during the "break in", so I'm pretty comfortable carrying it now. The fact that I currently don't have another option makes it an easy decision. :(
     
  14. B.D. Turner

    B.D. Turner Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    719
    Location:
    Eastern North Carolina
    What about all of the new 1911's, Garands, Carbines, M14's and M16's that marched off to war either new or shot very little? I like stuff that works. If I have to shoot a half of a case before I can trust it I will buy something else.
     
  15. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    23,908
    Location:
    Arizona
    B.D. Turner has a good point. Uncle Sam never used a small arm that needed to be shot in before it was considered reliable, and the same is true of other military forces around the world.

    This "breaking in" bull started with, and has been largely centered on 1911 style pistols made during the last 2 or 3 decades. That's when they were tightened up and made into big-boy toys instead of serious personal defense weapons. As a consequence some worked, and some didn't.

    As for shooting so many rounds to test reliability. I never did, because if reliability was questionable I didn't buy the gun in the first place. These days many manufacturers don't even bother to test fire a full magazine through each of their products. Quality control and floor inspection has become a lost practice - replaced by computer models and random picks.

    So in the unlikely event that I was to buy and carry what comes out of factories today, and in particular if it was a 1911 clone, I would indeed give it a workout before I used it for anything serious.
     
  16. moooose102

    moooose102 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    3,024
    Location:
    West Michigan
    well, in semi-auto pistols i do. for the reliablilty end of it at least. i think every semi-auto pistol should have a minimum of 200 rounds through it prior to carrying for defense. every semi-auto i have owned had at least 1 "glitch" in the first 100 rounds or so. now, if i could afford a Kimber, or Wilson 1911, i would expect those to work properly right out of the box. but, i wouldnt feel real good about handing over a $1500-$2000 gun to the cops in the event i did have to use it.
     
  17. The Bushmaster

    The Bushmaster Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2005
    Messages:
    7,990
    Location:
    Ava, Missouri
    And the weapons used in WWII were some of the loosest weapons you ever handled...Colt's.45 ACP being one. Most of the contract M1's I've had the pleasure of handling were pretty loose too.

    The modern civilian handguns, semi-autos and revolvers, are manufactured to some pretty tight tolerances...My Kimber UCC II had a few failures to feed and one slide lock back in the first 200 rounds. After that I have put 500 rounds through it without a failure of any kind. It was rather stiff when I took it from the box. Now it is smooth as silk.
     
  18. Ramone

    Ramone Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    827
    Location:
    Tidewater VA
    +1 to TAB
     
  19. moooose102

    moooose102 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    3,024
    Location:
    West Michigan
    those guns were made to opperate under combat conditions. dropped in mud, sand, dirt, opperate without being cleaned for hundreds and hundreds of rounds in the worse possible conditions. rain, snow, sleet, swamps, etc. they really were not as concerned as much with accuracy, as functionability. an accurate gun, that does not work when dirty, is a club. and when the enemy is coming at you, with his semi-auto, or full auto, a club is not very effective. so in a war situation, this is very acceptable, but on the civillian target range, not so much.
     
  20. eflatminor

    eflatminor Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    421
    Depends on your definition of reliable

    If you take say, a new semi-auto pistol, and right out of the box it fires several times without a malfunction. You take it to the local range and shoot a box of ammo without a failure. Does that mean it's reliable? That depends.

    Now, take your new semi-auto to an IPSC match, shooting bursts of rapid fire, up to 30 or more rounds in just a few seconds. Get that gun hot hot hot. Be the last one to shoot on a stage and the first one to shoot on the next stage. Shoot 30 more rounds as fast as you can. It's 95 degrees outside. Shoot all six stages without a malfunction. Do this at three or four matches without a malfunction, 200 rounds per match. NOW your pistol is reliable right out of the box.

    It's not uncommon that a new gun will experience a few malfunctions during those first 1000 rounds or so that you never see again. Even if there are no malfunctions, the slide will work faster or at least more smoothly as the gun breaks in, allowing one to improve their split times.

    So, there's breaking in and there's breaking in...depends on how hard you're using the gun.
     
  21. BrennanKG

    BrennanKG Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2006
    Messages:
    504
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    TAB,

    I was thinking the same thing: tolerances, engines, and such.

    Let's look at an extreme example: Les Baer 1911s. They are, IMHO, absurdly tight. However, I'm not going to accuse the man of making anything less than fine handguns.

    I would say that in general, match-grade, high-precision firearms might benefit from a break-in period during which some of the contact surfaces wear in.


    B.
     
  22. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2006
    Messages:
    11,717
    Location:
    Johnson City, TN
    Agreed, it is more for that than a "break-in" per se.

    In the first ~200 rounds I can live with sporadic stoppages, but it had better straighten up and fly right after that.
     
  23. Creade

    Creade Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Messages:
    133
    I recently purchased a Springfield loaded 1911 that was ridiculously tight out of the box. 1000 rounds later it feels and shoots, much better.
     
  24. MICHAEL T

    MICHAEL T Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Messages:
    6,011
    Location:
    outback Kentucky
    Wonder who brakes in all the new Military weapons befor issue. I mean be nice if my new rifle was tested before I went in to a fire fight.
    Was my New. Beretta fired 500 rounds before I was issued for carry
    Was those about worn out 1911 I carried Were they tested after a rebuild. 500 or so rounds befor sent back to duty.
    I was issued a M-16 in Nam that didn't have a fireingpin. Lucky I found that when cleaning before going out .
    A good pistol should work out of box. Thats why I have Colts not the POS para I bought or the Kimber I traded . Neither worked out of box. My Dan Wesson is tighter than my Kimber and has been flawless since day one. Didn't need any break in.

    When you send back to factory do they test fire 500 rounds. Lucky to get a mag fired But we fixed it . How do they know .
    They should work and relieable out of the box. How many people buy today load and carry with out shooting it. A great many. We are a small% of the American gun owners. Most never go or may be 1 time to a range. But they have a pistol and a ccw .
    Should company be sued if pistol jams in a SD sitution. Because you didn't shoot 500 rounds before carry. Maybe. If my new car brakes fail and I have a wreck off show room I gonna sue why not Kimber Colt S&W whoever. Might make them , make relieable and not the break in excuse.
     
  25. jdc1244

    jdc1244 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2007
    Messages:
    845
    Location:
    Florida
    Not to the extent of shoot a round, clean, shoot a round, clean, shoot around, clean – as one often hears with rifle ‘break in.’

    I’ll do an initial clean of a new firearm and use it expecting it to be reliable and function correctly. With regard to handguns, the Colt’s 1911s, CZs and Rugers I own have functioned flawlessly out of the box. As noted there is a ‘break in’ involved with all machines but nothing I’ve perceived with semi autos – pistol or rifle.

    I have noticed the action smooth out on my bolt action rifles, however, as the bolt jewels it slides more easily.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice