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Does anyone actually carry a Walker or is it just a range gun?

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by ChasMack, May 8, 2013.

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  1. Steel Horse Rider

    Steel Horse Rider Member

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    You have to maintain your own perspective. 20lbs is much to heavy for some people to carry but to others it is a minimal weight. Walking 5 miles is just a jaunt to some but across the room for the TV remote is too much to others. Do not project your own perspective on others as it just ends up in an endless and pointless discussion.
     
  2. kituwa

    kituwa Member

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    They are big and bulky but are still fun to shoot and will be cool to hunt with.Truth is though a ROA will do anything a walker will and in a much better made more compact size but those are not easy to come by anymore.I would trade my walker for a ROA if anyone has one laying around,lol. Shoot,,i may even trade it for a nice remington but i would prolly kick myself for it.
     
  3. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    It is a piece of cake. Yes, it's heavy but not at all unmanageable. I reckon you like to assume that because YOU can't do something, it can't be done. Or maybe you should try actually doing something before passing judgement. Seems to me there's a lot of ass-u-ming going on.


    The Walker is five ounces heavier. Big deal. My cell phone weighs 4.6oz. If five ounces is killing you, you should probably take up knitting. No, I'm not tougher than a coffin nail. Sitting behind a desk for the last 8yrs has made me soft. Still, I may walk a half mile, I may walk several. Either way, if I have an issue, it's with my feet because of the extra 50lbs of ass, not the 4lbs on my hip.


    I'm six foot one inch, fat and out of shape. Not a friggin' Olympic runner.


    I'm afraid to even say that my rifle weighs almost 10lbs. That I also tote an 8" bowie, hunting pouch and haversack. :rolleyes:
     
  4. VA27

    VA27 Member

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    I sold my Walker to fund an ROA. I really like the ROA's ( I have two, now) but I regret selling the Walker and will have another one someday. There is just nothing else like it.
     
  5. rondog

    rondog Member

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    I'm thinking about building a wheeled carriage for my Walker, suitable for the cannon that it is!
     
  6. Pancho

    Pancho Member

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    Quite frankly this is one of the goofiest conversations I've ever read on the forum.
    I would suggest that carrying a Walker as a belt gun was rarely if ever done, except in Hollywood.
     
  7. kituwa

    kituwa Member

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    Well i dont use cap n ball guns just because of the historically things about them or to play cowboy at the range.Thats all cool if your into that, and i like learning the history myself.They are just what is practical for me. They do the job that i need out of a handgun and do it well.I can load the gun for small game,target shooting or big game even.And all without as many silly laws and regs that a cartrige pistol has.They do of coarse demand a little more care and time cleaning them but that just gives me an excuse to spend more time with my guns.
     
  8. Kitika

    Kitika Member

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    I carry my Walker in this.
    09012012039.jpg
    It hangs off my shoulder on a bandoleer and my dragoon is cross drawn off my belt from this.
    19102012117.jpg
    I wear em both at the same time along with all the other cas stuff it can get heavy by the end of the day but so does a pair of vaqueros. Having the bandoleer really does help though.
     
  9. AlexanderA

    AlexanderA Member

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    The Walker is to pistols as the 1849 Ames Rifleman's Knife is to knives: ridiculously oversized. These were both short-lived experiments.
     
  10. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    Does anybody know of a good IWB holster for one. I'm thinking of carrying a Walker as my everyday carry. You know, for summer wear when I'm wearing shorts and need something inconspicuous. Maybe an extra capped cylinder or two in a pouch on my belt. :)
     
  11. mykeal

    mykeal Member

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    Now THAT's funny!:D
     
  12. kituwa

    kituwa Member

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    An inside the waist band holster for a walker would hang like a horse,lol.:D
     
  13. kituwa

    kituwa Member

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    They need to come out with a new crocadile dundee movie featuring a walker,"no,this is a pistol".He could nic name it something like the hammer of Thor.
     
  14. mdauben

    mdauben Member

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    There are several custom leather shops that sell "Gus McCrea" rigs (cross-draw holsters for Walkers, often with a large sheath knife and belt pouch or powder flask). I've never actually worn one, but I'd love to get one. ;)
     
  15. Billy Shears

    Billy Shears Member

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    The choice of the Walker Colt to arm Josey Wales was really my only complaint about the movie. In the book on which it's based "Gone to Texas," the author simply calls them "Colt .44s" and almost certainly intended them to be the 1860 army model. Which would make perfect sense. Leaving aside the unlikelihood that Josey would have found not one, but two revolvers that had been out of production for twenty years, and never numerous to start with, they really are impractical for belt carry. Moreover, Josey is supposed to be lightning fast as a pistoleer, and the Walker would by just about the worst choice imaginable for someone who wanted to execute a fast draw -- not just the weight, but the extreme length of the guns would be working hard against you. It's a classic case of Hollywood excess: the hero has to have the biggest, most badass gun out there. You can see this attitude today with action heroes in some movies carrying big Desert Eagles and so forth (though thankfully they seem to be getting away from that a bit nowadays).

    As others have remarked, the Walker was never intended for belt carry. It was a horse pistol. Not only were very large "horse pistols" common for military use in the era of single shot muzzle loading arms, when Samuel Colt marketed the Patterson, and it proved such a hit with the Texas rangers, he no doubt had an eye toward more such sales, and he was taking the advice of Texas ranger captain and Republic of Texas army soldier Samuel Walker. When the revolver debuted, it was a handgun that offered more firepower than any previous arm practical for military use. But there was no comparable longarm that gave the individual so much firepower. I think what Walker wanted, for the cavalry and for the Texas rangers was the best of both worlds. He wanted a repeating firearm with more range and power than was typical for a pistol. There were no long guns on the market in the 1840s that gave any shooter this kind of firepower, so he and Colt collaborated to upscale a revolving pistol so it could fill the role. Then came the Dragoon models -- slightly smaller, but still definitely horse pistols -- when the Walker proved a little too powerful (there were a number of kabooms). But note that when practical repeating long guns like the Henry and Spencer rifles came along, no one ever made these big horse pistols again.
     
  16. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    ^ Yeah, that's annoying to me too when they do stuff like that.
    I read a book the other day where the main guy carries a Walker and they keep refferring to it as a Colt .45. :banghead: I guess it's slightly possible that one could have been converted........? I dunno but it didn't make a lot of sense. There were only about 1,100 made.
     
  17. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

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    I'd bet money that MY Walker weighs more than 5 ounces more than MY 3rd model Dragoon. But I don't have any postal scales.

    I'd carry the Dragoon on my belt. Dunno about the walker. I think I'd dislocate my shoulder before the barrel cleared the holster. :D
     
  18. ThorinNNY

    ThorinNNY Member

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    I read that Colt designed the 1851 Navy Colt .36 cal. because it was more practical for an "active man" to wear and carry.
     
  19. woodnbow

    woodnbow Member

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    The average man back in the 1840's thru the '60's was a good bit smaller than we are today although probably a good bit tougher in terms of musculature and attitude. The weight probably wouldn't bother him as much as the difficulty of drawing a piece that long from a slim jim style high riding holster. Many of the shooters I see at the local range are not in any kind of condition to pack big pistols for any distance...
     
  20. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    I do. My Dragoon weighs 66oz on a very nice digital postal scale. The Walker is listed everywhere at 4½lbs but Cimarron lists it at 4.48lbs. Which makes it five ounces and change heavier than the Dragoon. The point being, if you can handle the Dragoon on your belt, you can handle the extra 5-6oz of the Walker. If you spend as much time as I have handling and shooting such a big sixgun, it's not really a big deal.


    At least they were percussion pistols and not Colt SAA's.
     
  21. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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  22. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    Texas Ranger and later Senator John "RIP" Ford was known to carry two Walker Colt's, on his belt.

    john-s-rip-ford-1850s.jpg


    Here's another dude with a big Colt:

    walker-colt-holster-2.jpg


    An 1850's gold rusher:

    walker-colt-holster-1.jpg


    I'm not the only one investing in a holster for these beasts:

    002-14.jpg

    Colt_Walker_Set.jpg
     
  23. kituwa

    kituwa Member

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    ^^^^Very Nice!
     
  24. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

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    Kitika, I really like that rig. Do you have any detail photos? I'm thinking of sewing up something like that.

    Yeah, it's it's about half his height!
     
  25. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

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    Cool pics!

    Thanks for the scale weights also. Any recommendations for a digital scale?
     
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