Quantcast

Does Anyone REALLY Hunt With 300 Win Mag?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by ReadyontheRight, Oct 31, 2006.

?

Do You Regularly Use 300 Win Mag or Other "Magnum" Cartridge?

  1. Yes! A Magnum Cartridge Fills a Hunting Need for Me.

    157 vote(s)
    39.3%
  2. My Only Hunting Rifle is a Magnum Hunting Rifle.

    29 vote(s)
    7.3%
  3. I Own a Magnum Hunting Rifle, But I Rarely Use It.

    66 vote(s)
    16.5%
  4. I See No Need For a Magnum Rifle.

    147 vote(s)
    36.8%
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Maverick223

    Maverick223 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Messages:
    11,269
    Location:
    28078
    Not necessarily, his argument is that the .308Win. doesn't have enough velocity to carry the large .30cal. payload effectively. I agree with his assessment. You sacrifice both sectional density and ballistic coefficient by going with lighter projectiles, or a great deal of velocity by going with heavier ones. OTOH, he likes the 7mm-08 (which has less recoil) as well as the .30-06, both being closer to the optimal caliber/case capacity relationship, and thereby providing better ballistics.

    :)
     
  2. Fremmer

    Fremmer Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Messages:
    2,284
    I'm not sure that's his rationale at all, because he states how many people are kicked too hard by the .30-06. I think he made a silly statement about the .308, which detracted from the rest of the article.

    I will say it once again, depsite all of the ballistic coefficient and sectional density arguments: the .308 will kill deer and elk just as well as the .270 Winchester, the .30-06, the .25-06, the 7mm-08, the .243, the .257 Roberts, and all of the rest of the standard (non-magnum) rounds. None of the ballistic coefficient/sectional density arguments mean a hoot when you shoot at a deer 150 yards away. None of those figures matter, because as a practical matter of reality (actual hunting, not charts and figures), the .308 will kill it just as dead as the .30-06. Or the .257. Or the 7mm-08. Etc.......
     
  3. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    7,430
    Location:
    Alabama
    I agree with Maverick from a technical standpoint and Fremmer from a practical standpoint. Does that mean they BOTH could be right?
     
  4. Maverick223

    Maverick223 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Messages:
    11,269
    Location:
    28078
    True, but so will a .30-30Win. In fact the .30-30 needs the larger caliber because of its low energy, it simply has to "bulldoze" its way through to get the job done, a smaller caliber would be a detriment in this case. I am not knocking the .30-30 either...it has earned its spot. Likewise, I am not saying that the .308Win. is incapable, only that it isn't the most practical, nor my personal favorite.

    :)
     
  5. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2005
    Messages:
    23,171
    I missed what should have been my answer: No, but I've shot a jackrabbit with a .45-70 Sharps rifle. DRT. Well, actually not "Right There", but rather a good distance back from where it had been when I hit it, but "Dead", anyway.:D
     
  6. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Messages:
    10,050
    If a guy can handle a .30-06 he can handle a .300 WM (WM stands for Win Mag BTW not Weatherby Mag. (Wby Mag)) the recoil between the two is not significantly different. The majority of the difference in recoil between a .300 WM and .30-06 is imagined and or recoil pad/stock fit.

    The .300 is not the answer to many problems but it does have a place in the great big wide world of hunting. If you are shooting Whitetails from a stand at under 300 yards well a .300 WM probably isn't the perfect rifle for your application.

    If you are a world wide sheep or goat collector who hunts the high mountains of world for the rarest and most sought after trophies the .300 WM or some such starts to make some serious sense especially when that hunt might be a combo hunt for mountain grizz either on purpose or by necessity.

    The .300 WM also makes a fine elk poker and there is nothing wrong with one on a Mule Deer hunt right here in the Western USA.

    With all of that being said I seldom find the need for one but I do have to say that with regards to the mule deer I've killed with my .300WM it definitely puts them down with authority. I still prefer a .30-06 for various reasons to a .300WM for most applications. If I feel I need more kill (read penetration) than a .30-06 or a .270 can deliver like when I am hunting elk in thick cover I go to a bigger heavier caliber like a .338 or a .375 as they give incredible off angle penetration so I can safely make kill shots on bigger critters. That is another place that the .300 WM can be handy, using 200 or 220 GR bullets to give more reliable deeper penetration.

    I enjoy using different stuff from time to time while hunting but there really isn't any definitive right or wrong answer on these what caliber threads. Anything can fail and anything can work you just have to develop a good level of confidence in your chosen tool and then go out and put some meat in the freezer.

    One of these days I am going to draw that coveted Bighorn sheep tag here in Colorado and when I do I'll finally have use for that poor little old .300WM mountain gun I have sitting in the safe.Until then she waits for a real purpose, sitting, waiting, always the bridesmaid never the bride...:)
     
  7. Captcurt

    Captcurt Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2010
    Messages:
    2,701
    Location:
    Ozark Mountains of Arkansas
    If it works, don't worry about it.

    I have a cheap, Savage Ultralite in 300 WSM that outshoots everything but my tactical gun. I own several centerfire rifles rangeing from 243 thru 45-70 but I find myself picking up the Savage without even thinking about it.
     
  8. sam700

    sam700 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2007
    Messages:
    225
    My only hunting rifle is a 300 win. I've got lots of rifles, but only one is a hunting rifle. The others are bull barrel target guns or AR's.

    I used to hunt with my target rifle. It worked fine when I was hunting farm land in wisconsin, but way too heavy when I decided I wanted to start backpack hunting in the mountains out west and in Alaska. I decided that I was better off getting one gun in a caliber suitable for huning all game I wanted to hunt. I could have bought a 270 for most hunting and a 338 for the ocasional moose or alaskan bear hunt, but I would not be proficient with it.

    Because my 300 is my go to gun for all game I am very comfortable with it and can handle it like it is an extension of my body. If I had a 270 for 90% of my hunting, I would never be as proficient with a mag in the rare instances when it came out of the safe.
     
  9. elorenzo

    elorenzo Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    meeker
    Magnums have thier place

    I have been hunting for over 30 yrs and i can honestly say that a magnum in the hands of a well seasoned hunter is a good tool but in the hands of a testosterone charged idiot it can be an unethical firearm i own three magnums a 7 mm mag,300 win mag,and the mighty 338 win mag all three guns have served a purpose elk, moose ,and black bear. on my deer hunts i will use one of my other guns my favorite being th great 30-06. i really believe that at least 50% of the guys that own magnums have no business shooting them you have to shoot your gun to get a feel for it and it"s ability at taking game ethically pulling a 378 weaterby out of the box and saying that you are going hunting next week is pure insanity

    PS. for all you guys that think a magnum makes you a better shot please learn to shoot first :cuss:
     
  10. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Messages:
    10,050
    AMEN BROTHER!! I call it 7MM syndrome. There is nothing wrong with a 7MM but there is a lot wrong with a guy who trades in pappy's 06 for one and thinks he just became an automatic 600 yard elk assassin.
     
  11. elorenzo

    elorenzo Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    meeker
    finally

    you and i are on the same page H&H to many guys think of the big magnums like an extension of thier manhood :)
     
  12. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2008
    Messages:
    7,708
    Location:
    Mount Desert Island Maine
    Wow a long read!! I have a Savage 300WSM cause I got it for a steal. The original owner got sticker shock when he went to buy replacement ammo after burning up 4 boxes he got with the rifle.:D I got it for $150 and bought dies the next day. Never looked back, it is now a go to rifle for me. I love it and BTW what are you all arguing about anyway. Just use what works and let someone else learn by observing your success. :neener: Happy shootin.:cool:
     
  13. QikEnuF

    QikEnuF Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    Messages:
    1
    Going to be doing deer hunting with an AR50 next year when I get out of the sandbox. Looking forward to it. Also, my dad hunts with a 300WM Remington 700, and it works fine.
     
  14. COLTHR

    COLTHR Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2
    Gotta love the "which is best/right" debate...always gets things stirred up.

    The real answer is, "it depends".

    Depends on what, where, and how you are hunting. And finally, on what makes you happy.

    I used a .300WM in Africa on plains game -- size of game ranged from Jackal to Kudu. Worked great, no issues. Most shots under 250 yards, but was glad to have it for the longest shot at 440 yards. Have used other magnums on other hunts, never felt like I had too much gun. Recoil is an issue for some and not for others. Mainly it's a training issue, but if recoil bothers you enough that you won't practice enough with it, it should be addressed. You can put a slip-on recoil pad on for prone and bench (which is the only time I think rifle recoil really bothers most people) and then take it off for seated/kneeling/standing so you get the same ergonomics as when you hunt.

    If I had to have one deer/elk gun for everything then it would likely be the .30-06 just cause it does everything in NA, depending on distance and load, and if your ammo gets separated from your gun you can usually find some where you end up. Happily, I don't have to make that choice. For hogs to deer I've been using a 20" barrel Savage .308 just because it's what I like to practice with.

    Accurate gun, good load, good bullets, good glass, and mainly, be able to shoot well (holdovers/come ups/reading wind) and any gun will do out to the max optimal range of that setup, for that animal. But I would rather be overgunned than undergunned.

    As for the ethics of long-range hunting. Well that's a personal call, but seems to me that a lot of the logic against it does not stand up. I think we can make a universal statement that willingly causing an animal to suffer unnecessarily is a bad thing. But if only shooting when you absolutely "know" the kill will be clean is the rule, then bowhunting would be out, and honestly, rifles would be out over 200 yards for the average hunter. As far as getting closer with a rifle being more sporting, I think that's a personal call as well. A few years back I was on a moose hunt and we hadn't seen one after five days of hard slogging. I was ribbing our Indian guide about it and he said he had shot one right there (as he pointed out the truck onto the road). "From where?" I asked. "From this truck" he responded. I made the half-joking comment that that did not seem very sporting. He gave me a look I'm sure he had practiced on other city boys, and asked me if "I bought my groceries from the store closest to, or farthest from, my house?" For him hunting was a way of putting meat on the table, and unlike me he did not have the luxury of ritualizing the process.

    Don't get me wrong, my favorite part of hunting is stalking, reading sign, not knowing if I'll come home with meat or empty handed. And my least favorite part is actually killing the animal. But that's just me. I don't like shooting prairie dogs cause I can't eat them (YMMV) but I don't begrudge the guys who like to shoot em by the barrel load. Just not my thing.

    I'm going to try my .338LM out next year, probably on elk, and depending on how the loads work up I'll probably restrict myself to shots over 600 and under 800 yards. Bullet expansion is what will decide the max range. I probably won't have to do the same level of stalk I would to get within 300 yards, but I'll have to do a whole lot more research (on ballistics and load/bullet performance, as well as shooting (I'll put at least 500 rounds of reloaded .338 downrange through this gun before I go after the elk) and I'll keep shooting my .308 at distance on practice ranges and at matches to develop my skills.

    So that's the long-range scenario I'm comfortable with. To me it looks like a lot more preparation than the average deer hunt, and I'm pretty sure there's less of chance of a sloppy kill or a lost animal.

    I guess if I had to sum up my thoughts on anything from bowhunting to ultra-long distance, it would be: know your limits.
     
  15. Psyco Tyco

    Psyco Tyco Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2009
    Messages:
    61
    the only rifle ive taken game with nowadays is a magnum, own plenty for shooting but just cant seem to get away from that awesome power....though i take elk and bear....so your mileage may vary

    magnums are just fun to me, i like having insurance that my bullet reaches the target traveling 1000 feet a second so i know the hollopoint opens, and it doesnt take away from all my other guns usefulness

    if i ever get the chance to hunt deer and antelope again i know ill pull out a smaller gun like a 243 or .30-06 but it all comes down to what you want to tote on the mountain and when your shoulder can handle for training, even a crap shot with a magnum doesnt equal a kill just an inhumane shot to an animal....if you cant practice with a magnum then you cant hunt with it
     
  16. Simpotico

    Simpotico Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2008
    Messages:
    17
    Versatility is why I own a magnum. My hunting/utility rifle is a Remington 700 ADL in .300 WM; not that I can even remember the last time I fired a factory load through it. I consider myself a rifleman and hand load each round typically to .270 or .308 standards and pack it with a full 220gr load in bear country (coastal AK and north of the Arctic Circle). Although, I feel completely confident with a 150gr .308 load for personal protection; bears ain't bullet proof. Besides, situational awareness and good bear sense is better for personal protection than any shoulder cannon.
     
  17. Kachok

    Kachok Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    4,429
    Location:
    Palestine TX
    I have always owned a magnum "just in case". Mind you I have never seen a deer or hog at 500 yards much less had a clean shot on one. I have owned 3 7mm rem mags including my first rifle, all they have ever done that my 6.5x55 or my 308 won't do is blow up a bunch of meat LOL. That said my friend has a recently retired 220 acre cattle farm where I might get a 500 yard clean shot, so I will continue to own a magnum "just in case". As far as kiling power goes kenetic energy is only the third most important factor. Shot placement and penetration are much more important then massive "hydrostatic shock" A half inch wide permanate wound cavity through the heart or lungs will kill plenty quick. Liquifying the entire chest cavity is just for show. I will amend this to say that if you can shoot your 300 win/7mm rem mag as well as you can your 243, and you are hunting trophy elk or larger, by all means use it if it gives you more confidence just don't down talk folks that have confidence in their 30-30, chances are they have been doing this way longer then you.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2010
  18. usmccpl

    usmccpl Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    471
    I dont use it a lot but I have a Ruger #1 in 300 Win Mag that see time in the deer field. Mostly it is when I hunt in a spot where I might have a longer shot than 200 yards.
     
  19. Spittin Lead

    Spittin Lead Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    i mainly use my 270 but i do carry my 300 win mag from time to time. as far as recoil (not that it's bad) it doesn't affect me when i'm hunting nearly as much as target shooting. When i'm hunting i'm focused on the game not the recoil so i don't even notice it.

    also i do kinda like it for one reason. i had a shot where there were two yearling white tails standing side by side and broad side to me. i was able to get a complete pass through on both animals. so that negates the argument of higher expense of ammo!!! :evil:
     
  20. Big Bill

    Big Bill Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,476
    Location:
    Idaho
    A 300 WSM. What Expense? One shot one kill!!!
     
  21. Coal Dragger

    Coal Dragger Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2008
    Messages:
    2,076
    Location:
    Black Hills, SD
    I see no need for a "magnum" rifle for any game in the lower 48 states. If it can't be done with a .270, .280 (or my new pet .280AI), or .30-06 then chances are pretty good you are not hunting any game found within the continental United States.

    I used to shoot a lot, and still shoot quite a bit, and I shoot better more consistently with non-magnum rifles. Most people do. That isn't to say that I can't shoot a magnum rifle accurately, just that I see no point in mucking around with one at this time. The difference in real trajectory is not all that great, and with the advent of range finders, and BDC type recticles, is barely worth any advantage.

    Besides it is no damn fun going out with a .300 Winchester in a sporting weight rifle and putting in real practice from field positions (especially prone, and sitting). Of course most "hunters" consider themselves to be great shots because they can shoot tiny groups off of a bench rest. Then again they are the same idiots that can't manage to hit a milk jug at 100yds offhand, much less at 200yds.
     
  22. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    7,430
    Location:
    Alabama
    The same is true for a .223 if you put it in the right place. A .300 wsm won't do it if you can't put IT in the right place.
     
  23. timney t

    timney t Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2010
    Messages:
    26
    300 Mag is a great round but i use the old tried and true 30-06'. i figure if i need more knock down power i might as well hunt with a 375 H&H.

    i have a range that has targets out to 300 yards and the 06' is solid at that range. i WILL ALWAYS try to bring the game in closer but i am confident at 300 yards with the 06'. shooting 180 grain Hornady SST bullets.

    You can't go wrong with either round in north america to be honest.
     
  24. jeepmor

    jeepmor Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2005
    Messages:
    2,827
    Location:
    Stumptown
    True dat, prone is painful on my 300, even with a limbsaver pad.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2010
  25. brettrow

    brettrow Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    120
    Overkill. Ive talked to a lot of guides and they all say the same thing. They would rather have a hunter shoot a rifle they can handle and be accurate than vice versa. They see too many injured animals gut shot on large bore guns because the hunter thinks he can handle it. .270 and 30.06 are a great combo for medium and large game. Both will take both.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice