Does carrying with one in the chamber make anybody else uneasy?

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics, and Training' started by vincyr, Mar 29, 2020.

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  1. jr_watkins

    jr_watkins Member

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    To the OP (Vincyr), this topic always brings out a semi-violent response on this and other boards. It always results in a large percentage of respondents belittling anyone who dares have a different opinion. This is absolutely an individual decision and you shouldn't feel pressured in any way to do something you aren't comfortable with. Your decision should not impact your decision to carry a concealed handgun.

    Allow me to give a different opinion on several of these topics.
    1) Holster type & location have a larger impact on speed than if you have to rack a slide. Do a test yourself, time your draw-rack-aim-fire from appendix or 3 or 4 o-clock position with a good retention belt holster. Now compare it to an ankle holster or a small of the back holster or an armpit rig. You will find the time it takes to rack the slide minimal to the clumsy draw from these other style holsters. Don't even get me started on a fanny pack or anything with a zipper! Funny how nobody gets excited when people carry using these other type holster methods.
    2) If you rack the slide to chamber a round EVERYTIME you draw at the range or during dry fire practice it will become second nature, same as the guy who has to remember to flick off the safety. You'll find it helps you with reloads and jam clearance as that motion is already built in. Additionally, the racking of the slide allows you to adjust your grip slightly if necessary so that first shot will be better.
    3) On the "injured hand" scenario....funny how there isn't an "injured shooting hand thumb" scenario for the guys who have to flick a safety. I would be more concerned about an injury to my sight that anything if I'm being honest. Engaged support hand....fight like crazy until it isn't engaged!! Look, as a civilian concealed carry person you are defensive and aren't going to be able to cover every scenario, you aren't special forces operator!
    4) I'm sure there will be especially loud screaming to this one...I want some extra time in my response to make sure I have the situation accurately perceived. Ever misread a situation? Imagine if you immediately over-responded....how's that helping your family? That extra half second may be just what you need to get your wits about you and make the right decision, it may allow the threat to make a different decision, different action.

    For what it's worth I have been carrying concealed since George Bush was governor of Texas. Pants on, gun on. I carry all the time, working, operating machinery, gardening, working animals, playing with the kids/grandkids, watching TV, eating lunch, etc. I shoot weekly at my home range and often at public ranges with friends. I don't chamber a round until I think I might need to fire...snakes and coyotes surprise me mostly.
     
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  2. bdickens

    bdickens Member

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    Pure bovine excrement and displaying a lack of knowledge about how "many of these striker guns" actually work.
     
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  3. Jessesky

    Jessesky Member

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    I don’t know the statistic, but it’s something like 80% of all malfunctions happen upon charging the gun. (Don’t quote me on that number)
     
  4. .455_Hunter

    .455_Hunter Member

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    The principle is called risk migration. All guns are dangerous, all triggers can be pulled by something. However, designing a trigger system that is more susceptible to inadvertent activation (from WHATEVER the source) than established systems in the name of supposed tactical supremacy is reckless.

    No doubt fingers still out number "foreign objects" as the direct cause of a ND, but ignoring those potential risks and just saying "more training" is the solution ignores the reality of everyday carry by real people.

    The overall issue is that these events are relatively rare, so many shooters will go though a lifetime without an ND, so by default, whatever they do is "safe" and "perfectly fine". Unfortunately, when Murphy does strike, the results can be permanently and fundamentally life altering. That is why I oppose any platform that increases the probability of a ND (it only needs to happen once) just to be "tactical".

    I say the same thing about magazine releases, because in real life, you are more likely to inadvertently and unknowingly activate an "easy access" magazine release than needing to execute a John Wick quality reload. Give me a stiff heel release that I know my magazine will always be fully seated as opposed to a "tactical" extended special that increases the possibility of a magazine being dislodged when I need it most.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2020
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  5. .455_Hunter

    .455_Hunter Member

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    Really? I know EXACTLY how the striker guns actually work.

    The actual mechanics of the firing system do not matter when the same trigger input results in activation.

    I chose the Series 80 because it has an actual firing pin block (not dissimilar to the striker guns), resulting in a moderately spongy release who's weight and travel distance are barley discernible from a "good trigger" striker gun. We could probably argue about the lack of a dingus in the regime of firing from drop induced trigger motion, but that's not the scope of the discussion.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2020
  6. bdickens

    bdickens Member

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    You really ought to try that sometime with someone lunging after you. Better yet, try to do it after getting jumped from behind & sucker punched.

    The first part of this: again, you really ought to try it sometime....

    The second part: well, you should get a proper grip in the first place when you draw so you don't have to justify to yourself reasons for adopting substandard practices.

    Irrelevant. Injured hand is injured hand & we're back to operating the gun with only one. And you're adding unnecessary steps hamstringing yourself further.

    You really need to have all that figured out before you reach for your gun.

    My favorite. Just because you've been doing something wrong for 20 years doesn't make it right.
     
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  7. Kleanbore

    Kleanbore Moderator Staff Member

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    So what?

    I hate to put it quite this way, but considered objectively, that is ridiculous.
     
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  8. Zerodefect

    Zerodefect Member

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    Doesn't matter about striker triggers. My Glock rides between two sheets of .090 Kydex. That trigger ain't getting hit by anything. And the holster is tuned to latch onto the trigger frame, with no chance of touching the trigger at any time during the draw or reholster.

    EmptyChamber.jpg
     
  9. GEM

    GEM Moderator Staff Member

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    After staff discussions, we have decided to close this. I could make a last editorial comment but I just ask the reader to peruse the responses, evaluate their abilities and decide what to do. Your personal outcomes are up to you.
     
    JShirley, Craig_VA, URIT and 2 others like this.
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