Does dropping off a dog help HSUS?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by gravelyctry, Feb 8, 2009.

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  1. Rockwell1

    Rockwell1 member

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    This needs to be restated again very, very clearly

    Dog fighters, as well as, laboratory suppliers get "free to good home dogs" all the time and sell them to labs or use them to teach fighting dogs to kill. Please do not under any circumstance advertise your dog on Craig’s list.

    Also there was a recent case in North Carolina (?) in which PeTA employees were tried for cruelty to animals. Apparently, PeTA was going around picking up dog and cats for transfer to their shelter and while the owner was sitting in their living room filling out paperwork a PeTA employee took the dog out to a van and euthanized it before they ever left the home. All this while promising the owner that they’d find Fido a good home. Please be very careful who you release your dog to, as others have said it is very much your responsibility to find it a good home
     
  2. ldyates

    ldyates Member

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    "As usual any dog thread degenerates into idiocy"

    Careful.... You might just learn something in this thread. This is all about personal responsibility... much like gun ownership IMO. "just a dog"... "just a cat".... "just a 2nd amendment"... No big deal!

    Forcing others to clean up ones mess or asking a government to do it for you is very left thinking. If your pet needs to be Euthanized, take it to your vet and have it done.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2009
  3. panzer426

    panzer426 Member

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    Very few dogs biting or over energetic/over enthusiastic behavior is actual a permanent problem...nor is it normally the dogs fault but rather owner/family fault.

    Work with the dog and solve the issues rather than dumping the problem(s) on someone else who may be forced to put it down.

    I agree, it is about self responsibility. If you HAVE to rehome he dog, it will be a lot easier if you have already solved his/her problems. I am sorry but unless a vet has diagnosed a serious neurological disorder in the dog, it IS ownr/family fault. Even if the only fault lies in you (your family) picking the wrong breed for your situation.
     
  4. bensdad

    bensdad Member

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    We're getting a little "preachy" about pet problems being owner problems. I realize we all mean well, but somewhere between "always" and "never" lies the reality.

    I have a German shorthair that stayed in the litter until 11 weeks. She has been IMPOSSIBLE to socialize with strangers. I don't care. She lives in the house or hunts with me and the wife, so it doesn't matter. But to say, unequivocably, that pet problems are owner problems is not fair and not true.
     
  5. ldyates

    ldyates Member

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    I gave a 90/10 based on personal experience and hundreds of hours volunteering to rehab, medically treat, rehome and in some cases euthanize throw away dogs.

    I challenge all of you that are interested to spend a few hours at a shelter as a volunteer. When you witness a perfectly healthy dog reach out to shake hands with the animal control officer as he goes inject the Euthasol it will tear your heart out.

    The "Truth" is that responsible pet ownership starts at your home. That is indeed somewhere in the middle, so +1.
     
  6. Rockwell1

    Rockwell1 member

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    There has GOT to be a better way :(
     
  7. rustycrusty

    rustycrusty Member

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    My wife and I volunteer at the SPCA which is NO KILL ever. They do good work and are not pro or anti guns/hunting they are concerned about animal welfare.
    Behavior problems are IMHO 90% environmental (owner/previous owner) related. I don't know the whole story of the problems the OP has with his dog
    but it could be corrected if OP wanted to/could. That said I think that only the OP can determine what he is capable of doing or putting up with to get the dog to conform to the family's needs/wants. Training a dog is hard work and MUST be done consistantly and regularly to get the results you want.
    Most people think they just go pick a dog by how cute it is and not what the breed characteristics are, then they find out they don't have a Lassie but a Cujo. I've seen it at the shelter. We just adopted an Australian Sheppard mix that is cute as a button but hardheaded as a goat. She has eaten two pair of gloves a pair of shoes tupperware et c. we just have to be diligent in keeping everything picked up. The Rottie mix that wandered into the backyard three years ago is nearly perfect. No muss no fuss. Sweet as any
    pup ever.
     
  8. CentralTexas

    CentralTexas Member

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    I don't understand why this thread isn't closed!

    If talking about tPresident Obama, his cabinet appointments and political views of anti-gun elected officials isn't "gun related".

    DO you also carry a list of all the other anti-gun companies and avoid doing business with them (I would hope so)? That's about everyone from Ebay to Google as well folks.

    I apologize in advance if the next line offends- There are very few behavioral problems in dogs that aren't caused (and corrected) by training. This will take effort, time and I suggest a copy of every book and DVD from the DOg Whisperer you can get...
     
  9. Kat144

    Kat144 Member

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    If you don't take it to a shelter...please don't give it up for free. That is how too many animals end up in testing laboratories or with abusive people (I could tell you a really sick story I read years ago about just such a thing--it was so bad it's stuck with me that long--but, yeah).

    Very true, and in this economy a lot of people are giving up their pets, so shelters are packed. We adopted our cat last October from the local shelter and they were stuffed to the gills (when we went to look, my partner called to see what time they were open until and the lady panicked at first thinking we wanted to drop off an animal). Our kitty had been there almost a year (I think as a small city shelter it was probably not as high-profile as the Humane Society, etc. shelters) and I suspect she was an economy casualty (but having been there that long, they couldn't remember exactly how they got her). I'm certain they lost money on her....they're in my rotation of charitable giving, though.

    Where, exactly, are you finding idiocy? I'm seeing a lot of people advocating responsible animal ownership. That passes for idiocy these days? Or were you referring to your own post? Of course, I believe your username says it all...
     
  10. Rockwell1

    Rockwell1 member

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    Slightly off topic but,

    Since no one else has mentioned this, I will.

    One of the biggest things you can do to help your local shelter is to have your pet spayed or neutered
     
  11. bad_aim_billy

    bad_aim_billy Member

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    Good call on the spay and neuter.

    And Craigslist is full of pets these days, more than I've ever seen. I would assume the economy has a strong influence, as dogs especially aren't cheap to own. :(
     
  12. akodo

    akodo Member

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    My understanding is the Humane Society of the United States chose that name to cash in on the good will already garnered by the American Humane Society and other local Humane Societies
     
  13. Rockwell1

    Rockwell1 member

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    Isn't it amazing what you can learn watching "The Price is Right" ?
     
  14. evan price

    evan price Member

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    Most shelters will charge the drop-off to take an animal, especially one which is released as having behavioral problems. Expect that the dog will have a quickie assesment by a volunteer with a hand-surrogate, and then if it shows any tendancies to be aggressive- off to the needle and the crematory. No second chances, there are lots of animals that have a chance to be adopted and they won't waste much time on those that are borderline unless a volunteer sponsors them.

    Sorry to say, the bigger the city, the more likely to just kill and dump.

    Every animal I have ever owned has been a rescue, my wife is a veterinarian, and we like it that way.
     
  15. smilin-buddha

    smilin-buddha Member

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    Be very careful when someone says their shelter is NO Kill. I used to work at Animal Control. We had a local shelter that Claimed in all their adds to be a no kill shelter. We picked up animals twice a week at their location. They also would load up their van and bring dogs and cats to us. One time I cased in 42 animals from their shelter. Just because they claim to be no kill does not mean they do not dump dogs off at other locations. Several times people woudl call us to claim their animals and told us they had donated large sums of money for the care of their animals. In one instance the sick kittens were dropped off in the morning and they were at our facility by 2 p.m.
     
  16. Justin

    Justin Moderator Emeritus

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    This isn't really on topic.
     
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