DOH! I dropped my 1100 LT-20!

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by ReadyontheRight, Sep 30, 2008.

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  1. ReadyontheRight

    ReadyontheRight Member

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    I was re-arranging the safe for hunting season last night and I stupidly dropped my 20ga Rem 1100 LT-20 onto its buttstock. It took a nice big chunk out of the end of the stock and broke the plastic buttplate.:banghead:

    I will be quickly adding a rubber mat in front of my gun safe. And checking my gun handling skills. As far as this gun goes, a few questions:

    1. This is an early model LT-20. Is there any collector value in repairing the stock?

    2. This might be a good excuse to cut down this stock for my kids. Does anyone have a process or products for doing this? Ideally, I would like a (cheap) adjustable stock or a set of spacers to adjust LOP as they grow.

    3. Does anyone have an inexpensive 1100 20ga stock they want to sell? :eek:

    4. Will a 12ga 1100 stock fit? Or a stock from any other Remington?

    Thanks!
     

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  2. cowboy68t1

    cowboy68t1 Member

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    If you want to go with making it into a youth model. I just put a Graco adjustable stock on a 12ga. 1100 for a friends son. It's about $75 once shipped. You can adjust drop and length of pull. Plus you can cant it left or right. You will need to drill a 1-1/8 hole in the stock if I remember right. This will allow for the post to screw in all the way in for a short length of pull then as your kids grow you simple spin the recoil pad plate out as much as you need and tightened down two screws on the side. I also added a morgan curved adjustable recoil pad. This younger needed all the drop we could get him.
     
  3. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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  4. GearHead_1

    GearHead_1 Member

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    I had the same kind of break on an 1100 12 gauge a long time ago. I can laugh about this and tell the story 25 plus years later, I was a complete idiot. Holding the forearm I unscrewed the forearm cap nut to remove the "duck plug". Well as you can imagine I was left holding the forearm while the shotgun hit the floor. I bought a new rear stock before I ever fired the shotgun, it was my father's new shotgun. I couldn't tell that story for years. Didn't want anyone to know how stupid I was. I could easily repair damage like this these days but wasn't as sure of myself back then.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2008
  5. axeman_g

    axeman_g Member

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    call remington... they will send you another stock for $$. A good smith sould be able to join it for you for a fee.... but it will be more then a new stock.
     
  6. PotatoJudge

    PotatoJudge Member

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    I'd fix that stock, get a new recoil plate, and order a synthetic stock to cut down for the kids. When the kids get older they'll appreciate being able to use the same shotgun and will appreciate the wood more than they will at this age.

    To fix the stock, wipe paste wax on the finished edges of the wood where the glue will seep out then glue and clamp however you see fit. Wait until the glue is partly dry then with a soft scraper take off the excess glue. From the looks of things, that shouldn't be too bad a place to clamp.
     
  7. brasskeeper

    brasskeeper Member

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    A friend of mine has the same shot gun with the same stock damage. He rounded the area with a rasp and sand paper applied a sealer and was shooting doves with it again.
     
  8. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    West System Epoxy. Seriously.

    Sand it a bit (carefully and patiently use 150 to shape, 220 thin sanding sponge to smooth), refinish with 3-4 thin applications of Tru-Oil, use 0000 steel wool between coats and lightly on the last one, then terry cloth towel to blend.

    Replace the buttplate.

    If you're ever around here, I can show you some major stock cracks fixed that way. You won't see them unless you know you're looking.
     
  9. ReadyontheRight

    ReadyontheRight Member

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    Excellent! Fixing it it will be!

    West System Epoxy - great call. I know just where to buy it. Reminds me of the days "chasing the rot" on my old 31' wooden boat. I think that hull was mostly epoxy and 3M 5200 Marine Sealant when I retired it.

    Great tip on the paste wax where I don't want the glue to seep out. I will be using that trick for other projects.

    Also - great idea on the Graco adjustable buttpad and a cheap synthetic stock!

    A final question -- I will check eBay, but where else is a good place to get a new buttplate?

    Thanks all!
     
  10. Virginian

    Virginian Member

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    Good grief.
    Option 1 - Do not mess up the mating surfaces. Mix up some good two part 5 minute clear epoxy. Lightly paint both surfaces with it. Squeeze together and hold for about 4 minutes. Wipe off excess with a rag dampened with laquer thinner. When fully dry, sand lightly with 400 grit, then spray with gloss clear polyurethane. From 3 feet away no one will be a ble to notice.
    Option 2 - Buy a good used stock.
    Nothing but an LT20 from the late second series , after they eliminated the white line spacers, will fit and match checkering wise. I think they changed the checkering in 1979 - I have one with the first style checkering. All LWs are first style. Butt plates are plentiful on eBay and elsewhere.
    I have a plastic handle on my garden spade and I think it is great. On that. I like wood on a gun. If you want plastic heaven knows there ar 50 options available.
     
  11. ReadyontheRight

    ReadyontheRight Member

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    As noted above as a result of good advice, my plan will be to repair the wood stock with a specific glue in a specific way and possibly buy a plastic stock to drill/cut down for my children.

    Apparently my extremely low serial number of "43" threw me off, but...since the LT20 is no longer made...I wondered if the checkering is valuable and makes the stock worthwhile to repair. Apparently so. Thanks!

    I plan to use the great suggestions from ArmedBear to buy a specific product and process to repair my stock. I also plan to use the great advice of PotatoJudge to use paste wax to protect the surface from glue and only cut down a plastic stock. Cowboy68t1 recommended a great adjustable buttplate for a good price. I might just use that great advice someday too.

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2008
  12. Virginian

    Virginian Member

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    All Remington current 20 gauge receivers are the LT20 size. This receiver size has been in continuous production since 1977; I don't know if they are still rollmarked LT20 or not though. I did not mean to imply the checkering was extra valuable, just trying to help you see what you were facing if you wanted to get a new/different stock and have the stock and forend match. I always consider a clean break worth fixing because it is so relatively easy.
     
  13. ds92

    ds92 Member

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    This happened to me just about a year ago with my .22 rifle. It slid out of the back of the guncase which had become unzipped and slammed into the cement floor of my basement, which severed about 1/6 of the stock below the bottom screw of the pad.

    If you plan on owning your gun your whole life, like i did, just repair it with wood glue and a clamp. But if you plan on selling it or something i would get it repaired.
     
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