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dont know much about handguns?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by sdhunter, Dec 23, 2012.

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  1. tarosean

    tarosean Member

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    With that budget I would forgo the budget 1911's. Since you want 9mm I would suggest
    FN Hi Power.. Like the 1911 its a full size gun, SAO trigger (Single Action Only). Yet thin so its easily concealed. IMO, It still remains one of the most ergonomic pistols ever designed. 13rd capacity with ability to purchase higher cap mags.

    If you want modern, M&P 9 compact or Full size. American made and lots of people love them. I personally hated everything about the MP45c I owned, but that was a matter of personal preference. It never malfunctioned or gave me any issues.
     
  2. ljnowell

    ljnowell Member

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    Op dont take a single link to heart. Every gun of every model and make has had issues at some point. My first 1911 was a RIA GI compact, its a fantastic gun. Nevewr malfunctioned and feeds SWC, HPs, etc. I shot well over 2k rounds theough it in the first year I owned it. If you like it get it, you wont be unhappy.
     
  3. ku4hx

    ku4hx Member

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    Shoot many; buy one. Many ranges rent guns and our club sponsors new shooter events and classes quite often. You might want to check into both those possibilities in your location.

    Many new shooters purchase what they believe is exactly what they want only to find out it's not. Many experienced shooters will tell you it's rather unlikely you'll get the perfect gun for you on the very first try.
     
  4. Edarnold

    Edarnold Member

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    Have you actually handled a 1911-style pistol, or any of the other guns being suggested? One of the reasons you see so many 'like-new' handguns offered for sale is that people get all hopped on the coolness of a gun, then once they actually own it and shoot it they realize it doesn't fit them at all. The grip, balance and design of a handgun can make it feel like an extension of your hand, or like a lump of iron. No amount of aftermarket add-ins is going to make pistol fit you. Buying a pistol by the history or cool factor is like buying a pair of boots because they look cool, without trying them on.

    Find one or more gun stores and try the feel of a bunch of pistols, shoot them if you can, then lay your money down.

    IMHO
     
  5. easyg

    easyg Member

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    How about a .357 magnum revolver, like the Ruger GP100?

    The .357 magnum is an excellent self defense caliber, and can even be used for hunting.
    And you can shoot cheaper .38 special rounds for plinking and target practice.

    And once you master the double-action revolver trigger, shooting other pistols is a breeze.

    Another thing to consider...

    Most modern autoloaders are rather reliable, but none are immune from a bullet related malfunction (failure to eject, failure to feed, hard primer, dud round).
    If you're not willing to routinely practice failure drills then you might be better served with a revolver.
     
  6. ku4hx

    ku4hx Member

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    That's one of the best and most meaningful comment I've read in a long time.
     
  7. jamrock

    jamrock Member

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    I wouldn't recommend a 1911 as a first handgun for someone unless they had a lot of experience shooting someone else's 1911 and I mean years.

    I always suggest a glock 19 as someone's first handgun.
     
  8. Pilot

    Pilot Member

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    I would suggest a 9MM, and here are a few to check out:

    CZ-75B
    CZ-75D PCR (light weight compact version)
    Beretta 92FS
    Sig P228 or P229
    HK P30 or USP series
    Glock G19
    Springfield XD series

    The CZ accepts the wonderful .22LR Kadet conversion unit which changes the CZ-75's into a .22 pistol. It is accurate, and reliable, but also lets you practice cheaply with a full size service pistol.

    1911's also have .22 conversion kits, if you decide to go that route. Since you reload, the choice between 9MM, and .45 ACP isn't as big a difference. For 1911's, I still like Colt.
     
  9. buckhorn_cortez

    buckhorn_cortez Member

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    Why - because that's all your familiar with? What in the world did people do in 1981? Not shoot semi-autos because they couldn't buy a Glock?

    Today you have so many good 9mm pistols available like the S&W M&P line, HK pistols, Beretta pistols, Springfield XDm series, Walther PPx series, Browning Hi Power, CZ 75 series -all as good or better than a Glock.

    If you want to shoot a 1911, the only way you learn to do it is by shooting it. I started shooting semi-autos with a 1911 in 1980. Shooting a 1911 isn't rocket surgery, doesn't take an advanced degree from a university, and isn't nearly as difficult as people are making it out to be. All of the hoopla about "muscle memory" makes it sound like a 1911 is the equivalent of launching the Space Shuttle by yourself. Shooting a 1911 is no more difficult than learning to ride a bicycle where balance is learned - you just do it until you understand how it works.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2013
  10. PabloJ

    PabloJ Member

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    Buy popular model that is currently made. This means accessories and spare parts are readily available. Never pay premium of any gun that is no longer made and even when found in box as new deduct about 30% from current model offering. Oh, very important first pick up some ammo then go to the counter and pick up the gun.
     
  11. Bentonville

    Bentonville Member

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    I would have to say that I wish I had discovered the Beretta 92FS as a first 9MM. I like the heft, the safety is as close to fool-proof as far as safety of having the gun in your hand. It requires training but it is simple: when pistol is drawn, automatically sweep the thump up and forward. The double action first shot is a safety in itself in case of a high adrenalin situation. The gun is very reliable, accurate, and has low felt recoil. It uses 15, 18, or even 20 round magazines which won't break the bank to purchase. It is easy to disassemble and clean. I like the trigger for HD and for plinking after an easy installation of the D spring. It has a great track record with millions being used. After all, it's in a lot of action movies from the 80s and 90s. What else do you need to convince you?
    As far as a .45, I have owned many different models and for me, the HK45c is an ideal pistol. All of the above and top-shelf quality with interchangeable back strap to semi-customize the grip. Either will last a lifetime. Either can be carried discreetly with the proper holster and lots of training. If I had to choose only one, it would be the 92 due to cheaper practice ammo and high capactiy magazines. Good luck on deciding. With all of this knowledge and experience found on this great forum you can't go wrong. Its best, as you know and has been stated, to hold and fire various guns. I couldn't because of my location so I had to go on hearsay. I did not go wrong in the least. Love my Beretta and my HKs. Love my snubbies too! i wonder if you can really only purchase ONE gun???
     
  12. Thompson9494

    Thompson9494 Member

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    The CZ 75 series is a great choice for a beginning handgun, especially if you want a .22 conversion to go with it. Depending on the price of the CZ 75 itself it may exceed your $600 budget by a few dollars if you throw in the Kadet kit but there are deals to be found like any other gun. The CZ 75 has light recoil, 16 rounds of 9-mm, is accurate, reliable and easier to disassemble than the 1911. You can't go wrong. You may wanna check out the threat "Beretta 92 vs CZ 75B" for more info on the CZ 75B.

    Good luck! What ever you buy, enjoy it!
     
  13. jamrock

    jamrock Member

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    Agree Def. an experts gun, especially the safety disengagment under stress, while draw from a holster. Not the same as standing at a static range and not drawing from holster.
     
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