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Don't like airweight snubs.

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by MUSICALGUNNUT45, Aug 30, 2011.

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  1. MUSICALGUNNUT45

    MUSICALGUNNUT45 Member

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    Am I the only one who really doesn't care for the new airweight smith and wesson snub nose revolvers. I've always thought they were just too light. I have a smith and wesson model. 60 made in the late 70s and it has some weight to it but its not like its pulling your pants down when you carry it. Its heavy enough to obsorb some recoil and light enough to carry comfortably. I just never got the practical use of having something thats as light as the airweights are, does anyone else agree
     
  2. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    I don't(agree,that is). I love the lighter weight snubbies. They are so light I forget I'm carrying.
     
  3. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    The hardest recoiling gun I've ever shot was a scandium Smith with full throttle .357 loads. It doubled in weight when loaded. That being said, I love how light they are. They are for concealed carry, and they're perfect for it. If something goes down and you need your sidearm, you're not going to be worrying about recoil. Just one fellers opinion.
     
  4. Rexster

    Rexster Member

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    Airweights are fine. It is the Airlites I dislike. There is a difference. This assumes .38 Special, max, as I do not believe in punishing what is left of my right thumb's base joint.

    My usually minimum carry guns are solid stainless steel SP101 Rugers; the aluminum-framed S&W snubby is only for occasional, specialized circumstances.
     
  5. 243winxb

    243winxb Member

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    Retired my M60, love the 10oz 337PD in 38spec. Recoil is high, but carries well.
     
  6. sixgunner455

    sixgunner455 Member

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    Like my Airweight, don't wanna shoot an Airlight. Would like to get a nice 1970-ish model 60 someday. :D How's that?
     
  7. Snowbandit

    Snowbandit Member

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    My model 340 is the best concealed carry gun I've ever had. Not much fun for practice so I mostly practice with my model 640. I still try to shoot 50-100 a month with the 340 though. That should be plenty.
     
  8. steelbird

    steelbird Member

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    Musicalgunnut 45 -
    You've got someone here who agrees with you- I'm not a fan of the lightweight guns in general, be they revolver or semi-auto. They always seem to jump too much in my hands; I like the extra weight to help control the energy coming out of the gun ( muzzle flip, recoil, etc. ). Some have no problem, I find that I do. I am happy to trade light weight for more control.
     
  9. Owen Sparks

    Owen Sparks member

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    I don't like snubs in general. Once the barrel shrinks below 3" the sight radius is just too short.
     
  10. csa77

    csa77 Member

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    I love airlight snubs, I have a S&W 340pd hammerless its gotta be the best concealed carry gun of all time IMO. so small so light and chambers 357, cant ask for better.
     
  11. MUSICALGUNNUT45

    MUSICALGUNNUT45 Member

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    Yeah well snubs are designed for ranges where if you have to use the sights you probably shouldn't be handling firearms.
     
  12. antiquus

    antiquus Member

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    I looked for a year and a half, and finally found a 242 for less than $400. Not LNIB, but it was going to be a daily carry so a little surface damage is going to pile up slowly.

    Carries great, typical S&W trigger very close to my 686, shoots great, heavy enough that staying on target isn't hard, 2.5" barrel is snubbie enough without loosing too much to very short barrel, long enough sight radius to be aimed, and 7 shots is enough.
     
  13. jon86

    jon86 Member

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    I like my airweight very much. I've never fired a 13 oz scandium 357, so I don't know how they recoil, but I can shoot my 38+p all day.
     
  14. fastbolt

    fastbolt Member

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    Folks have to find what works best for them.

    I came late to the Airweights. I'd stopped carrying a couple of Charter Arms .44 Bulldog's and an early SP101 DAO because they became too heavy for pocket holster carry, switching to a 649 Bodyguard .38 Spl for that role. My previous steel 36 had a 3" barrel and I wanted something just a bit shorter. (Okay, the Bulldog's also had some other problems I finally tired of dealing with, but that's another topic.)

    Eventually even the Bodyguard started to noticeably sag in some of my pocket carry situations. I returned to carrying larger revolvers and pistols, because if I was going to carry a belt gun, I might as well return to my medium frame 6-shot revolvers and Colt Combat Commander. Those turned into full-size and compact aluminum-framed pistols after a while, but eventually I again wanted something lighter and even a bit smaller than a compact alloy pistol.

    One day I finally decided to see why the Airweights were apparently becoming popular again, so I ordered a 642 just after the -1's were released and being shipped. I immediately noticed a big difference between my older 649 and the new 642-1 when pocketing the Airweight. Nice.

    Being a long time revolver shooter, and having owned a couple of steel J's, I found the DAO trigger manageable. Being a long time Magnum revolver shooter, I found the felt recoil & controllability to be fine for me. I refocused on my revolver skills ... and I've never looked back.

    Nowadays I own a pair of 642-1's (I like them), a 37 DAO and a pair of M&P 340's (with & without the lock) ... and that original 649. The Airweights get the bulk of the carry duties.

    Someday I may pick up a nickel 40, just to have another steel J-frame, but I've also thought of keeping my eye out for a LNIB 638 Airweight (made before the ILS was incorporated, but after it became rated for +P), if only to complement my all-stainless steel version of the Bodyguard series.

    I guess you could say I've come to like the diminutive 5-shot wheelguns. ;)

    Now, I certainly wouldn't try to imply that short-barreled 5-shot revolvers were suitable for everyone, let alone the Airweight & Airlite models. The very attributes which make the little J's so useful and handy for lawful concealed carry also make them harder to shoot. Even skilled shooters of larger revolvers often find the smaller & lighter 5-shot models difficult to shoot well ... and then even, some folks who find the steel J's to work well enough for them find the Airweights & lighter Ti/Sc models too difficult to shoot well enough to suit their needs or desires. I tend to dislike the Airlites, myself, but that's more because of the titanium cylinders than the increase in felt recoil. Different strokes, right?

    The J's can be very accurate in the hands of a skilled and experienced shooter who takes the time to master them, but even then the type of ammunition selected can make for a difference which becomes important among users. Some like standard pressure ammunition, and some find they can still do well with +P (in the models rated for +P, of course). Some don't mind the models chambered in .357 Magnum, but then the difference between the steel and the aluminum models may make a significant difference in someone's selection ... and maybe even breaking the aluminum Magnum models down further regarding whether it has a steel or titanium cylinder.

    Like I said, different strokes.

    The good thing is that S&W makes enough of a variety nowadays that just about anyone interested in a 5-shot revolver can probably find something which interests them and suits their needs. :)
     
  15. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    I find the practical use pretty easy to understand....They are great defensive weapons that can be carried easily. Do I want one to go target shooting at the range with? No. Do I like having one in my front pocket for protection? Yes.
     
  16. griz1

    griz1 Member

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    I have a S&W 640 all steel and I love it. It weights 19 oz. and I think that is perfect for daily carry. Its the 38 special only. Don't need 357 mag. and if I do I have Sp101 3 inch and S&W M65 3 inch. But the 640 is my main carry gun. I'm like you and don't see all the hype of the lightweights. May be for some but not me.
     
  17. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    And again we're talkin' about target accuracy and recoil with a gun that is designed for use at breath-sniffin' distance...likely in the dark...probably fired frantically with one hand at hip level. A gun designed and intended to be carried a lot and seldom shot. An emergency tool that will...due to its weight and bulk...most likely be there when one finds oneself up to one's crotch on crocodiles with shooting as the only option to extract oneself from the fray.

    I mean...really...how much practice does one need in order to press the muzzle against a belly and pull the trigger? How accurate does it need to be...or how accurate does one need to be with such a gun? It would serve just as well without sights at all. It would serve just as well if it wouldn't keep five shots on a pie-plate at 15 yards from a machine rest.
     
  18. bdb benzino

    bdb benzino Member

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    I love Airweights!! I have 2 J frames, a 638 and a 642, and one K frame a model 12. All of them are more than accurate enough and sweet to carry. Count me in as a fan!!
     
  19. TwoWheelFiend

    TwoWheelFiend Member

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    My brother just picked up a smith 637 (i think) its one of the airweight .38's and its a blast to shoot. I've carried it a few times and you do forget it is there.
     
  20. 4thHorseman

    4thHorseman Member

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    I recently purchase a S&W Night Guard. Scandium and shoots 44 special ammo. I guess it classifies as a snubby with a 2.5 barrel. The 44 shoots very good from the L frame and I just love it. I used to carry a Wilson, now it it is the S&W NG :)
     
  21. memphisjim

    memphisjim Member

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    I have none but do like the idea. And I will own one as soon as a 9mm model is made
     
  22. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    Super light snub nosed revolvers are very popular with some folks.
    Usually those people do not practice with the gun enough to shoot it well.

    Personally I am not a fan.
     
  23. amd6547

    amd6547 Member

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    I picked up this Bodyguard Airweight a while back, and find both easy to carry and easy to shoot. I practice with standard 38spl ammo, but I have also fired a minimum ammount of Remington +P SWCHP, my carry load, which is no problem to shoot at all.
    I disagree with the opinions stated here that the snubs are only suited to bad breath distance. Any pistol I carry gets exercised out to longer range.
    The first range trip I made with this Bodyguard, I started out at close range. Then I moved ot to 25yds. Finally, I took a crack at the 10" round steel plates my club has at 40yds...no problem hitting those repeatedly.
    The S&W snubs will surprise you with their accuracy if you apply the fundamentals. If you don't, and shoot it as if it is inaccurate...it will be.
    [​IMG]
     
  24. doc540

    doc540 Member

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    Sold all my lightweight Smith's and now carry Colt alloy D frames (Agent/Cobra).

    Light enough for carry, but heavy enough to control recoil.

    Problem solved.
     
  25. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    Interestingly enough Doc...the Cobra is as light or lighter than an airweight J-frame. But the grip is large enough to control it.

    (BTW...I too carry D Frames...love em)
     
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