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Dremel tools

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Vegaslaith, Aug 10, 2008.

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  1. Vegaslaith

    Vegaslaith Member

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    From what I gather, its good to have a Dremel tool handy for any gun related work. After visiting their website, I got thoroughly confused by the variety available. So, does anyone have any recommendations for an all around Dremel? I'm looking for one that accepts the most attachments.
     
  2. jhansman

    jhansman Member

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    I'd be interested in an answer to this as well. Their website is a mess, and after 10 min. there I left as uninformed as when I arrived. All I do know is a) I want a mutlispeed tool and b) a decent variety of attachments that let me work on wood, metal, or plastic. What else should one take into consideration?
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2008
  3. bogie

    bogie Member

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    Gunsmiths LOVE dremel tools. It's how they pay for their kids to go to college.
     
  4. RaspberrySurprise

    RaspberrySurprise Member

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    I have a black&decker RTX which is a 3 speed knock off of a Dremel. It has 12k, 24k, and 30k rpm settings. So far the only thing I've used it for is to open up the mag well on my WASR-10 which it was a great help with.

    If you'll have other uses for it then go for it, but it's uses with regards to firearms can be limited unless you enjoy accidentally grinding off more metal than you intended thus turning your firearms into either a nice paperweight or a gunsmiths next boat payment.

    To be honest good old hand tools are usually your best bet. I was easily able to de-burr my Mosin's chamber with just a dowel and some sandpaper.
     
  5. Dookie

    Dookie Member

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    go to home depot or lowes and buy the big fat kit. it will cost you about 80 bucks but you will get just about everything you need. Spendy, yes, but worth it in the short and long run.
     
  6. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    "...good to have a Dremel tool handy for any gun related work..." Nope. Like bogie says, smithies love guys with Dremels. They're ok for polishing using a cloth wheel and jeweller's rouge, but not for any kind of metal removal. Too easy to remove too much. Controlling that comes entirely with experience. Mind you, so does using a file. Smithies love guys with files too.
    'Dremel' is just a brand name for a rotary tool and they're expensive. You pay more for the name. (My Chinese made rotary tool, that works just fine, cost me $30Cdn. Came with a bunch of tools in a plastic box.) Especially for the assorted tools. Add at least 50% for the Dremel name on a tool or wheel. Any 1/8" shanked tool will fit.
    "...cost you about 80 bucks..." $40 or less without the Dremel name on it.
     
  7. CRITGIT

    CRITGIT member

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    Yeah that!
    CRITGIT
     
  8. JohnnyOrygun

    JohnnyOrygun Member

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    I second what Dookie said, I have two dremels... an Ace Hardware brand and an actual dremel. The big kit at Home Depot or Lowes is a good kit, it has several attachments that make using a dremel a lot easier. I especially like the "cable" attachment that allows you to hang up or lay down your dremel and work, sort of like a dentist tool.

    As others have pointed out, dremels and guns don't go together very well. It's really easy to damage your gun and cost yourself a lot of money. That said a dremel is one of the most useful tools you can have, but you have to be extremely careful. I recommend lots of practice on non guns before you try any gun related work, other then maybe using a polishing wheel and some jewelers rouge. But I have polished several knife blades and fixed the broken blade tip on my leatherman with my dremels.

    Practice, Practice and them when you feel that you are really good with a dremel, practice a lot more.

    But as others have said, this advice is worth exactly what you paid for it.

    Good Luck
    Little John
     
  9. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    "...fixed the broken blade tip..." A blade of any kind will still work with a busted tip. An excessively ground sear or hammer won't. Used mine to shorten some knife handle brass rivets that were used as decoration on a sword belt. Brass gets really hot when cut with an abrasive cut off wheel. Melted the carpet until I hung a bucket of water on the vise.
    "...The big kit..." That a store brand thing? Home Depot, up here, sells Dremel attachments and nothing else. Princess Auto, a small chain(and a place guys can get lost in), sells Chinese made attachments at half the cost of the Dremel branded attachments Home Depot sells. And they work well.
     
  10. JohnnyOrygun

    JohnnyOrygun Member

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    Just my Opinion and Experience. Take it for what its worth.

    I would never work on a sear, the only thing I would do to a hammer is perhaps take off some sharp corners or perhaps polish it. I use a dremel a lot, but very seldom on any of my guns. But there are things on gun that a dremel is safe to use on, the grips, perhaps you want to do a "melt treatment" on your 1911 (although files work better for this). What I am getting at is there are legitimate uses for a dremel on guns, but you have to be careful. I would never do any kind of work on a sear. I had a 1911 go full auto once on me at the range... wasn't really fun.

    You can just as easily ruin a sear or do serious damage to gun with a file, it's easier with a dremel, but still a file can cause just as serious damage or a dangerous situation. You have to be careful anytime you work on a gun. You have to be careful if you reload, people have been hurt very bad with reloads, but people still reload. Just because people have royally screwed up guns with dremels doesn't mean they should never be used on a gun, you just have to be **VERY** careful, like when you are reloading.

    As for the broken knife tip, you are right the knife still cut, but I didn't like the looks. So I took a file and my dremel and reshaped the tip and then polished the whole blade. You can't tell that I broke the tip unless you compare it to an unbroken blade from the same type of knife.

    The big kit is a gray tool box that holds the dremel and the various different attachment, (the circle cutting jig, the lawnmower blade sharpener, controlled depth cutting attachment and the "cable" I mentioned in my first post) then the box has some divided compartments on the outside for different types of implements (cutting wheels, grinding wheels, wire wheels, rotary cutting bit, and etc.) IF I could remember the name or model number of the kit, I would post it, but since most of the people here have internet access, I figure they can go to the home depot or lowes website and find it if they are interested in buying it.

    As I said, I have an Ace hardware brand rotary tool also. If you want a cheaper version, then by all means buy it. I prefer the real dremel, it has replaceable motor brushes (although in the 16 years I have owned the Ace Brand, I have never had to replace the brushes) its runs smoother, and there are a lot more attachments available from dremel, will they fit a cheaper version... probably, but I know they will fit my dremel and the ace hardware one also (its made by dremel).

    Everyone has their opinion, this post is my opinion. If you don't like it thats fine, it's just my opinion and my 2 cents. It is worth what you paid for it. :D
    When it comes to tools and guns everyone is entitled to their own opinion, if you like Glocks you like Glocks, if you like Charter Arms, you like Charter Arms. If you like Craftsman brand tools, that is your choice... some people only like snap on tools. I own some craftsman tools and I own some generic tools bought at Kmart, Ace hardware, Napa, and who knows where else. I don't own a Glock or a Charter Arms, some people swear by Glock, some people swear at Glock. Everyone makes their own decisions.

    When I replied to the OP I was just giving my experience and my opinions. Everyone has different experiences and different opinions, if we all had the same opinions and experiences it would be a down right boring world.

    Anyhow, I think this is my longest post since I joined THR, I think I have "shot" off my "mouth" enough.

    Good Night All
    Little John
     
  11. DRYHUMOR

    DRYHUMOR Member

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    I've used a dremal to relieve barrel channels, and polish stainless. Sometimes I polish knife blades. That's about it.

    One tip, once you get the attachment in you want to work with, wrap tape around the whole shaft. That will keep the locking nut from destroying or gouging something it shouldn't.
     
  12. Huckle2

    Huckle2 Member

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    Dremel is a great tool. I use mine to make small modifications to my holsters. Buy one in a kit, any attachments sold by dremel should work with it.
     
  13. mnrivrat

    mnrivrat Member

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    Just as rifles don't assault people , and guns don't kill people, Dremels do not screw up guns - people do .

    I don't know of a smith that doesn't have one . They work great for a lot of things , including some things having to do with guns. Bad gun work can be done with just about anything.

    Get a multi-speed tool with high rpm capability - flex shaft is seldom needed, but comes in handy for some tasks. (at lower rpm usage) As far as what types of end tool attachments, you will use just about anything from sanding disks, to carbide, and diamond shaping cutters. Polishing wheels, cut off wheels, wire wheels, and just about everything made for them comes in handy for one project or another.
     
  14. tigre

    tigre Member

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    I just got one of the Black & Decker ones, and I'm already finding new things to use it for. But the only thing I've done (or would do) with it as far as guns are concerned is polish the outside of the chamber so it looks shiny through the ejection port. I'm sure people with lots more experience could do plenty of gun repairs with it, but I don't think I'd risk it myself.

    I've got limited experience with them, but I'd get one of the cheaper variable speed ones (I'm really happy with the B&D), since you'll pay extra to have the Dremel name on the side. They pretty well all use the same bits and collets. I got the B&D RTX and a 75-piece accessory kit for $40 at Wally World.

    That's a really good idea, thanks! I already put a nick in some garden shears while I was sharpening them, but fortunately that's not a big deal.
     
  15. zoom6zoom

    zoom6zoom Member

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    I use mine mostly when I'm building AK receivers, trimming rails and such. Mine is actually pretty much a Dremel on steroids - I use my Rotozip with a flexible shaft.
     
  16. Piraticalbob

    Piraticalbob Member

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    You've already had good advice about not taking a Dremel to gun sears, etc., so I won't echo that.

    I will say that if you buy a genuine Dremel, buy the more expensive version with ball bearing bushings instead of the cheaper collet bushings. You can usually tell them apart because the ball-bearing version is also the variable-speed version, while the collet-bushing version is single-speed.

    If you ever get into working with a tool like this on a regular basis it might be a good idea to buy a jeweler's version, with the motor separated from the flex-shaft grip and a treadle control.
     
  17. mongocaver

    mongocaver Member

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    Flexible shaft

    I have a flexible shaft on one of my Dremels and it really makes it easier to do detail work. The end of the shaft that you hold is just larger than an ink pen and is much easier to hold and control than the bulky Dremel tool. The shaft is about 4' long and I am able to hang the Dremel off my work bench, way out of harms way. I leave it hanging there all the time with the shaft hanging off the side of the work bench, so that I don't have to dig it out when I need it.
     
  18. Kentak

    Kentak Member

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    The fact that some overenthusiastic home gunsmiths misuse a dremel is beside the point. They are extremely useful tools for a variety of home and hobby uses.

    Unless you plan to use it for very heavy-duty jobs, I would strongly suggest one of the nicer cordless models using lithium-ion batteries. They are quite powerful, lightweight, and have very good battery run time.

    Best value is to buy a kit that contains the tool and a good variety of cutting, shaping, and polishing bits.

    Yes, I'm a bit of a tool/gadget junkie, but they are quite useful.

    K

    PS: If you have a Glock, they are good for doing the 25 cent trigger job (after you learn the do's and don'ts) Basically, it involves polishing certain points of metal-to-metal contact in the trigger linkage that smooths out the trigger pull.
     
  19. Zeke/PA

    Zeke/PA Member

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    Dremel tools have limited use, keep them away frof your guns!
    Zeke
     
  20. Avenger

    Avenger Member

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    I've used a Dremel for a lot of things, but I would NOT use it on a gun or where any degree of precision is required. And I've long since learned that the higher speed settings are pretty much useless, unless you actually WANT to destroy things.
     
  21. doubleh

    doubleh Member

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    Dremels are great tools and useful for a lot of different jobs. I've managed to accummalate three of them over the years in different sizes. I use them building gunstocks and pistol grips and roughing in metal work. I even have on set up as a small toolpost grinder for my lathe.

    A Dremel is a tool just like a right angle grinder, a drill press, a file, etc. Your skill level determines the quality of work you can do with each tool. That said, it is very easy to create a complete mess with a Dremel.

    Anyone who would use a file or any power tool like a Dremel on any part of a trigger assembly needs help as it is just dumb.
     
  22. rantingredneck

    rantingredneck Member

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    I've only found one gun related chore that a dremel works well for. Removing dimples from newer Remington shotgun magazine tubes.

    They are good for many things, but not many of them gun related.

    Multispeed, flex shaft hangs near my workbench now. Only gets used on a gun when a newer Rem shotgun joins the family.
     
  23. Smokey Joe

    Smokey Joe Member

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    Use it or lose it...

    You wouldn't use a D8 Caterpillar to dig a single post hole. But you might use a power post-hole auger, even though you could go slower and more elagantly with a hand-powered post-hole digger. There is a tool for every job, and a job for every tool.

    That said, there are tools that some people prefer, and tools that some people prefer not to use.

    (My writing here is beginning to sound to me like a lecture by a Zen master.)

    Anyhow, I find a Dremel or its generic equivalent to be a fine tool for enlarging the recesses in a stock preparatory to glass-bedding an action in that stock. The secret is to not hog out the whole stock at once--do the bedding in 2 steps--leave some spots in the stock to hold the action correctly in place while the first application of glass is setting, then go back in with the Dremel and remove those spots, and re-apply the glass bedding there--the first glass application will hold the action in its place while the second application sets. Which comes back to using the tool to advantage to remove stock from the stock, while avoiding over-using it.

    ETA--Just remembered another old carpenters' saying: "If the tool's not right, the guy's not bright."
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2008
  24. bobbarker

    bobbarker Member

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    +1 MNRivrat

    Kind of ridiculous to tell people not to use Dremel's because they "Screw up guns." Unless you leave the dremel sitting near the gun, and it plugs itself in, and turns itself on, and goes to town on your gun, the Dremel didn't do it. The operator did. The Dremel is just as good as any other tool, in the hands of someone skilled enough to use it. And just as bad as any other tool in the hands of someone not skilled enough. That said, I love my dremel, I use it for a variety of things, but would stick it in my own eye before I'd take it to my gun. I'm not skilled enough to risk that. And I know it.
     
  25. proud2deviate

    proud2deviate Member

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    Remember, there is no problem that can't be made worse with a Dremel tool.
     
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