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Dry firing new revolver

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Ruger GP100 fan, Jul 14, 2010.

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  1. Ruger GP100 fan

    Ruger GP100 fan Member

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    I've been told that not only is it ok to dry fire the newer guns,but that it can even improve the smoothness of the action. How much is too much? I have a 2 month old GP100 with about a thousand rounds through it and the trigger pull does seem to be smoothing out. Had a gunsmith lined up to "massage" my gun's internals and replace the factory springs with much lighter ones,but chose to wait until I knew more about such things. This is my first gun and I know next to nothing so I'd appreciate any help.
    Took a friend's Super-Six 22 to the range today and I'll bet the hammer spring in it is near double the spring in my GP100. Do rim-fires need more of a punch?
    Thanks
     
  2. Sheldon J

    Sheldon J Member

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    At a K I would expect the action to be breaking in nicely, have them stone the action as well as replace the springs, but be careful too light and you can end up with a ND...
     
  3. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Rim-fire revolvers do require heavier mainsprings, but it sounds to me like your GP-100 may already have a lighter mainspring. Switching to lighter springs will give you a better trigger pull - but at the expense of making it less reliable. Personally I prefer total reliability.

    The GP-100 is designed to be dry-fired, but if you use snap-caps (available from www.brownells.com) you'll have some extra insurance against a mashed firing pin spring and possibly breaking the tip off the firing pin. Neither is supposed to happen, but... :uhoh:

    That said, dry firing is a great way to smooth (but not lighten) your double action trigger pull without voiding the warrantee.
     
  4. Ruger GP100 fan

    Ruger GP100 fan Member

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    The GP 100 I bought new and has the original factory springs. Does replacing the springs void the warranty? I'm OK by now with the trigger pull in single-action,but it needs help in double-action.
     
  5. Ruger GP100 fan

    Ruger GP100 fan Member

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    SheldonJ,that's the phrase I was struggling to recall, "stoning the action".

    Old Fuff,please explain what you meant when you wrote that lighter springs can cause unreliability.
     
  6. toivo

    toivo Member

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    I'm not Old Fuff, but I'll jump in anyway... :D

    A lighter hammer spring means a lighter strike on the primer. Too light a strike and the primer might not ignite. You're more liable to get misfires, which means "unreliability."
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2010
  7. Ruger GP100 fan

    Ruger GP100 fan Member

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    So,the hammer spring affects trigger pull? I guess I thought that trigger pull had it's own separate spring. I can see where trigger pull would be heavy in double action with a heavy hammer spring. So very,very much to learn...so little time. Still not quite sure what questions to ask. I hope there are many here with patience when dealing with newbies.
     
  8. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Those that abuse newbies here are generally hung without a trial,,, :eek:

    Our moderators are a hard, hard lot. :neener:

    Also this place is filled with generally happy GP-100 owners and users who are plain full of free advise. The only thing I would strongly suggest is that you don't change or switch out any parts, springs, etc. until you know a whole lot more. The components that are in it now were picked for good reason. So long as it isn't fooled with it's an exceptionally strong, absolutely reliable revolver.
     
  9. Ruger GP100 fan

    Ruger GP100 fan Member

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    The only thing I've changed is the front sight. Replaced factory with HiViz. Just couldn't see the stock sight in some light. Other than that I think I'll take your advice and leave it alone. Trigger pull seems much better than new in single action. Does "stoning the action" come under your "do not" list?
     
  10. oldfool

    oldfool Member

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    stoning is best done by a highly qualified pro gunsmith, if at all
    when all is said and done, it is a process of creating deliberate 'wear' on parts
    and does nothing in the long run that just shooting the gun a lot (live or dry) will not do just as well
    except that you would miss out on the fun of all those rounds "fired"

    and yes, there is more than one spring, but changing either or both does tend to run the risk of causing problems (light strikes and/or trigger reset), again best done by a pro gunsmith, if at all, and not guaranteed to not ever lead to future issues (as the gun wears in)
    like "the man" said, Ruger had their reasons for how it is, and they been making 'em a lot longer than internet gunsmiths have

    the decision you need to make is whether or not you really want/need to turn a really nice revolver into a race gun, or not
    your choice
    but over the long haul, highly tuned race car engines and race guns tend to not live as long, absent rebuilds

    enjoy
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2010
  11. oldfool

    oldfool Member

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    if all else fails, buy a Taurus 94/941 or a Hi Std Double Nine
    (22 DA/SA revolvers)
    try the DA trigger on those, and your esteem for the GP trigger wil instantly rise by several orders of magnitude !

    (apologies to Taurus fans, I do own some I love, but not those, on purpose... I do own and love the D-9, but use it only in SA mode)

    that GP100 "as is" will last several lifetimes, if not abused, and just keep getting better
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2010
  12. MrBorland

    MrBorland Moderator

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  13. oldfool

    oldfool Member

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    if I wanted to get an action job on any of mine
    Grant C. would be #1 on my list, no doubt about it, as good as it gets
     
  14. dougw47

    dougw47 Member

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    S&W's

    When I went through the academy in 1970...a Smith rep. came in and addressed my class while we were learning about the Model 10 revolver.

    He told us that we needed to dry-fire our revolvers 10,000 times before having any work done on them to smooth up the actions! LOL

    I bet they don't say that any more!
     
  15. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    I recommend, if you must have an action job done, that it be limited to polishing and fitting of parts and leave the springs alone. You do not want to compromise ignition reliability. Also, if you have any work done and at some future date wish to send the revolver to Ruger for service, they will remove any polished action parts or aftermarket springs and install new factory parts. Having said that, it is well known that many hundreds of dry fires can help to smooth out an action, and the revolver will not be harmed by doing so. You should do this, in conjunction with shooting, before considering an action job.
     
  16. roaddog28

    roaddog28 Member

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    Hi,
    The Ruger manual for the GP100 says you can dry fire your revolver. I have I would say about 600 dry fires on my GP100. I do use snap caps a lot. It will smooth out the revolver but not make the action any lighter. I did get a action trigger job on mine just to add some more smoothness to the pull. I would not use lighter springs. Overall, I like the action on my GP100. And my Police Service Six is better but the round count is high on this revolver. The action will get better.
    regards,
    roaddog28
     
  17. chicharrones
    • Contributing Member

    chicharrones needs more ammo

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    +1. My GP100 manual states the same thing.

    RugerGP100Fan, if you are new to revolvers, I wouldn't worry about "smithing" the double action trigger pull quite yet. With double action dry fire practice you will become more used to the trigger pull length and weight of pull. The GP100 trigger in double action is real close to any stock DA/SA revolver out there.

    If your trigger action is like my older GP100's trigger you can stage the trigger/hammer just before the hammer drops when pulling through in double action. So what you do is pull the hammer back to the point of smooth resistance, refine your aim, and finish the trigger pull. Not all revolver brands have this "feature" :D, but it is very useful to someone that knows how to use it.

    Of course, you can just pull the trigger straight back in one motion, too. :cool:
     
  18. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    I am aware that Ruger manuals say you can safely dry-fire their revolvers. :scrutiny:

    But on occasion I have replaced broken firing pins, which can be a chore. :cuss:

    A call to the Ruger Customer Service Department concerning this issue brought forth this reply. "Dry-firing won't break the firing pin, but if it does we will replace it... " :uhoh:

    I consider using snap-caps be be good insurance that helps keep them honest. Why tempt fate? ;)
     
  19. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    It is quite possible to do what he says, if you don't try to conceal the revolver in the pocket.

    That said, if you use a holster the gun will be more secure, the weight better distributed, and the method more comfortable...

    If he has to draw his cannon he won’t have to shoot, because someone in front of it will have a heart attack. :evil:
     
  20. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    If the firing pin broke while dry firing, it would have broken at he exact same round count by live firing. You just got a bad one. If it happens Ruger will replace it.

    Dry firing not only smooths up the gun, it makes you a better shot. Great way to practice.
     
  21. chicharrones
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    chicharrones needs more ammo

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    You're right. I only dry fired my GP100 for the first couple years. I use snap caps on all my guns, preferably Azooms. For my rimfires, I use fired empty brass.
     
  22. Ruger GP100 fan

    Ruger GP100 fan Member

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    Thank you all,again,for such great feedback. I'll be leaving the gun stock after reading all of your responses.

    Old Fuff,how I do wish my pockets were deep enough to hold my GP!!!:rolleyes: I'd buy one of every size and color. If/when I ever have the cash again I may just pick up one of those SPs...or a GP with a shorter barrel.

    My son-in-law has lent me his Super Six,or Single Six I guess they are called now,and at first I did not like the "clunky" feel when pulling back the hammer,but after several rounds I got to where I kinda liked it. Sounds and feels like a lot of things going on in there and,as I think I've already written either here or on another thread,the hammer comes down about 2 or 3 times as hard as does the hammer on my GP100. His 22 is very old and I think was passed down to him from a grandparent.

    Thanks again,everyone. What a great place to learn!
     
  23. Ruger GP100 fan

    Ruger GP100 fan Member

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    MrBorland,thanks for the links. Just finished reading the one regarding lubricants. Great information. I've been using Rem-Oil,so looks like I'll find another. The Gunsmith I considered having work on my GP100 uses a pink grease that he showed to me. Any idea what it might have been? Since grease for 'sliding" parts does not migrate,how do I go about getting it to those parts? Will I need to dis-assemble the trigger/hammer components or can they be reached without any trouble? Anyone know of a good video on lubing the internals of the GP100?
     
  24. Confederate

    Confederate Member

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    The best way to lighten the actions of the Ruger Security-/Speed-Sixes is to file down a little on the mainspring stem and dry fire the gun a few hundred times. By filing the strut, you won't need to replace the included spring for a new, weaker spring. For those with square butts, getting round butt grips and marking them on square butt guns, lets you grind off the excess steel, letting you use round butt rubber grips.


    [​IMG]
     
  25. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

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    I'm not sure why they forbid it but the manual for a Taurus revolver I own warns against dry-firing it.
     
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