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Dry lubricant; non conventional

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Instantbacon, Sep 28, 2009.

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  1. Instantbacon

    Instantbacon Member

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    I have a springfield xd9 and love it to death. No doubt it is the best handling pistol I have ever shot and it carries very comfortably (I like the feeling I get when I wear it, I can always feel it, but never uncomfortable). Anyways, I work at an auto parts store that repairs bicycles and we have this dry lubricant for bicycle chains that contains PFTE. I have used the spray on lubricant on bicycles and it leaves a nice dry film that lubricates very well, and I was wondering if anyone has used this on their firearms. If anyone has a better lubricant, feel free to tell me what it is, and what its main ingredient it I would love to know. I just want to make sure its properly lubricated. Thanks for your responses!
     
  2. chevyforlife21

    chevyforlife21 Member

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    what is it the liquid wrench dry lube?
     
  3. Instantbacon

    Instantbacon Member

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    Good question! We have the liquid wrench, and I examined the label and couldn't find anything conrete (that I recall), so I disregarded that as a good lubricant. I assume it is more like WD40 in that it is a wet lubricant that will not last long. The reason I asked about chain lubricant is because chains attract a lot of dust and I have always used chain specific lubricant because its dry (I work on bikes a lot at my job, but do not get a large selection on lubricants).

    I have become very interested in lubricants and have studied alittle bit on molybdenum disulphide. I have called around some stores and haven't found any lubricants based on moly, but it seems like the perfect lubricant to me. I have heard of moly coated 5.56 rounds but never had any experience with them and it was only a passing glance at an article on ar-15.com.

    I understand that PTFE is the same thing as teflon, and I am assuming that the majority of gun lubricants are PTFE based, can anyone comment on the effectiveness of PTFE vs. other dry lubricants like moly?
     
  4. Isher

    Isher Member

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    Sounds like we are talking about

    Molybdenum disulfide here.........

    Which in the late sixties was great for Viwi transmissions

    And bicycle chains.

    Pretty much lost track of it since then.

    isher
     
  5. chevyforlife21

    chevyforlife21 Member

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    well they make dry lube for guns. i too work on cars bikes etc... but unless its a cheap gun that you dont trust your life with i wouldnt use the all purpose lube. liquid wrench and wd40 arent the best for guns, while motor oil does work pretty good in certain applications. i usually just use breakfree clp its what the military uses on all their guns and you can pick it up at walmart for 4 bucks. clp is teflon it repels dirt to a good extent over other wet lubes.
     
  6. chevyforlife21

    chevyforlife21 Member

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    are you talking street bikes or bikes?
     
  7. Instantbacon

    Instantbacon Member

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    Bicycles, as in the human powered kind. I can understand the confusion, we are an auto parts-bicycle repair-appliance-auto repair type of store. A dying breed...
     
  8. Isher

    Isher Member

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    Chevy -

    Didn't matter.

    I was running a Viwi, a moto, and a bicycle.

    That thar Moly kicked ass with all three.

    isher
     
  9. chevyforlife21

    chevyforlife21 Member

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    yea sorry i just re read it after i already posted lol. yea i have never heard of that type of store.
     
  10. paralaska

    paralaska Member

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    I think the "white lightening" would be a little too dry. I use "ProLink" chain lube on my internals and rails.
     
  11. TDR911

    TDR911 Member

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    Brownells make a similar product called " Action Magic" I will have to lok it up and see what the ingrediants are. There are many lubricants that are far superior that a the normal petrolium based products that are generaly used and recomended by manufacturers. If you hvae access to registered SAE type test results and compare them, i am sure you will find many to choose from.
     
  12. Noveldoc

    Noveldoc Member

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    Some of the popular lubes like WD40 are hydroscopic and tend to draw in some moisture. I do not know about dry lubes in this regards but take care.

    Tom
     
  13. BlindJustice

    BlindJustice Member

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    WOW - WD40 is NOT a lubricant, WD stands for water displacement
    heck it's a mild solvent. and not recommended for cleaning
    Motorcycle o-ring chains.

    I'd check the heat range of any dry lube.

    Randall
     
  14. atblis

    atblis Member

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    I know this sounds boring, but just follow whatever is in the manual. A couple drops of oil in a few key places. Breakfree from Walmart works just fine. Don't be fooled by the snakeoil salesmen.
     
  15. BlindJustice

    BlindJustice Member

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    WOW - WD40 is NOT a lubricant, WD stands for water displacement
    heck it's a mild solvent. and not recommended for cleaning
    Motorcycle o-ring chains.

    I'd check the heat range of any dry lube.

    Randall
     
  16. Quoheleth

    Quoheleth Member

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    The only "white lightening" I know if is very wet. While it is a lubricant, of sorts, if used in too excessive of amount, causes all sorts problems. :rolleyes:

    Q
     
  17. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Yea, but you won't care. ;)


    Is Moly based. Same as Smooth-Kote from Sentry.
     
  18. BlindJustice

    BlindJustice Member

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    I use the lube that WIlson COmbat sells in the syringe type applicator
    - great way to apply the lube.

    Sorry about the double post, Intermittent Internet
    connection and wasn't sure if it posted.

    Randall

    FWIW - WD-40

    WD-40 is the trademark name of a water-displacing spray widely available in a variety of retail outlets. Developed in 1953 by Norm Larsen, founder of the Rocket Chemical Company, San Diego, California. It was originally designed to repel water and prevent corrosion,[1] and later was found to have numerous household uses.

    WD-40 stands for "Water Displacer - 40th Attempt". Byatt was attempting to concoct a formula to prevent corrosion, by displacing the standing water that promotes it. In the process, he arrived at a successful formula on his 40th attempt.[1] WD-40 is primarily composed of various hydrocarbons.

    WD-40 was first used by Convair to protect the outer skin of the Atlas missile from rust and corrosion.[1][2] The product first became commercially available on store shelves in San Diego in 1958.[1]

    AND I asked some Bicyclists. - great to use in the rain on
    bicycle chains but greasy - Boeshield T-9 works better
    for THAT application.

    R-
     
  19. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

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    I have become very interested in lubricants and have studied alittle bit on molybdenum disulphide. I have called around some stores and haven't found any lubricants based on moly

    http://www.uniquetek.com/site/696296/product/T1247

    This link take's you to Dri-Slide gun lubricant which is molydendum disulfide based, Does it work? This is what I used in Vietnam. You'd squirt it on, the liquid vehicle would evaporate and you had a black film on the metal that wouldn't attract dust, sand, or dirt. I never had any problems with it on anything as a lubricant. It's value as a protectorant may be questionable but I only use it on internal parts.

    I understand that PTFE is the same thing as teflon, and I am assuming that the majority of gun lubricants are PTFE based, can anyone comment on the effectiveness of PTFE vs. other dry lubricants like moly?

    I can't say one is better than the other. I've used Break Free for about the past 25 years. I think Dri Slide is better at not attracting dust and sand though. The only reason I don't use it more often is that it's not easy to find and I have a couple of gallons of Break Free that will last a long time.

    Dri Slide also makes a specific chain lube.
     
  20. runner6m

    runner6m Member

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    I was wondering the same thing just yesterday. Saw some of that dry lube Liquid Wrench at the hardware store, and was curious if it held up to the heat of firearms. It says it has PTFE in it. If I need dry lube I usually use Remington's Dri-lube stuff, but this stuff would be a cheaper alternative. (if it works).

    http://www.gunk.com/CAT_L512.asp
     
  21. wally

    wally Member

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    I like the Dupont multi-purpose "Teflon" dry lube for the trigger parts and such. It works quite well on my 22 pistols and being dry doesn't "hold" the dirt like CLP, but I've pretty much stopped using it as after a few years it formed a yellowish gum that caused problems in cooler weather -- we don't get much of that around here, so I suspect it'd be really bad where you have real winters.

    I'm back to Brian Enos' "Slide Glide" on the sliding parts and CLP everywhere else. I don't spend a lot of time cleaning guns -- I wipe them off. a dop of CLP or Tetra on the rails and return to the safe for next time only, taking them down when I start having problems. Any gun that won't go at least 1000 rounds without a proper cleaning quickly becomes a safe queen.

    The only exceptions are the guns I shoot corrosive ammo with, these I have to clean immediately after every outing, which means they often get left home if I'm not sure I'll have time to clean them when I get home.

    --wally.
     
  22. cottonmouth

    cottonmouth Member

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    A Canadian soldier gave me a can of dry weapons lube the other day and said it workes great, I havent tried yet but might give it a try on my M9 at the range since I don't carry it.

    J.B.
     
  23. LUPUS

    LUPUS Member

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    I have been using Würth's Dry Lube for a long time in my carry guns.
    It is a very good stuff in my experience.
     
  24. EOD Guy in VA

    EOD Guy in VA Member

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    I find it's a great way to lube magazines without attracting dirt.
    Remington (preferred) and Hoppe's sell it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2009
  25. 1SOW

    1SOW Member

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    Militec-1

    "Lubricates with a dry synthetic molecular bond".

    If the instructions are followed, it does what it says it will do and does it well.

    After it has been heated it's very slippery and at the same time "dry" and doesn't attract crud. Powder residue wipes off easily where it has been applied.

    It's primarily effective in friction areas including the bbl inside and out.

    It's cheap to use because so little is needed, and even cheaper for military and ret. mil: FREE from the manufacturer.

    Oh yeah, my son also uses it in his XD Service .45.



    It doesn't say what's in it, but it curiously sounds similar to the auto oil additive used in "Slick 50". I believe that is "moly-be-damned".

    I used "Dry-Slide" years ago on a bullseye .22. It worked well, but I haven't seen any for years...and years...and years.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2009
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