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EDC knife for a young man-gift ideas

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by D.B. Cooper, Aug 22, 2019.

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  1. D.B. Cooper

    D.B. Cooper Member

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    Yep
    Yep. Gerber is crap. You're right about the trekker. I just checked and it' "available to purchase through efense Logistics (has an NSN), but isn't a standard issue item.
     
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  2. Sarge7402

    Sarge7402 Member

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  3. joneb

    joneb Member

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    I have lost many knives, more in my youth.
    Personally, for a young man I wouldn't spend a whole lot.
     
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  4. Buzznrose

    Buzznrose Member

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    Good advice
     
  5. D.B. Cooper

    D.B. Cooper Member

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    That was always standard advice int he Boy Scout program. I bought my son a SAK Evo with a locking blade when he was about 10-after scout summer camp. Sure enough, he lost it. Two days ago I learned that his mom took it away from him when got back home and then she lost it.
     
  6. labnoti

    labnoti Member

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    Opinel #8 in stainless. It's light enough for pocket carry without a clip. It's inexpensive enough to replace when it's lost. It won't rust as easily as a carbon steel one or a Case in CV. It's awesome.

    Case slipjoints are still probably my favorite for gifting, but they generally cost between $50 and $100. I can't advise gifting one to someone for an every day carry knife if they're not already in the habit of looking after their knife on a daily basis. I would say all the same things about most Victorinox SAK's with the exceptions noted below.

    The Classic SD is affordable and indeed a classic but with minimal knife utility. I prefer the Rally because the Phillips driver is better than those cute little scissors. The Recruit is where the knife is actually big enough to have some practical cutting power, but for about the same price or even less, the Opinel is a better knife. The Pioneer is the SAK that starts to offer a truly good alternative to the Opinel, but at twice the price. As a multi-tool, it's clearly superior. I'd still probably prefer the Opinel's blade.
     
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  7. D.B. Cooper

    D.B. Cooper Member

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    Alox Pioneer is on my short list at the moment. I'm surprised at the lack of love for the SAK here.
     
  8. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    I bought all of my kids SWKs (usually the Explorer or the Fieldmaster), when they were in their early teens. Still have them and have put them to good use on many occasions.
     
  9. lemaymiami

    lemaymiami Member

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    That Boker Sodbuster (the larger one) really caught my eye... The sharpest actual folding knife I've ever owned (and still do - it's been carefully stored now for some years....) was a Henckels (the exact same pattern and size but with a carbon steel blade and a cherry wood handle.... ). I carried it on the street with my duty gear (one of the pouches on a double mag pouch was its home). It was a real workhorse meant for emergency cutting of seatbelts, and other restraints as well as a last ditch cutter that you could score bone with..... Henckels (like Boker a German outfit) long ago quit making folding knives but that blade style, in a thin carbon steel blade would cut almost surgically... Nothing I've ever owned (Benchmade, Al Mar, Forschner....) could compare to it....
     
  10. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

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    Quite a few used Henckels' folding knives on Ebay.

    When I lived in Westchester Co. NY, both Henckels and Wusthof had their corp. headquarters there and I was able to stock up on fine kitchen knives quite inexpensively at their yearly blowout sales.
     
  11. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    This Puma Model 644 slip joint folder was my EDC for many years. It has sort of reminded me of being their version of the Case Sodbuster.

    9ioCpL5.jpg
     
  12. John Joseph

    John Joseph Member

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    Regarding SAKs, when he's 21 you can upgrade him to the SAK with a corkscrew ;)
     
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  13. lemaymiami

    lemaymiami Member

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    Great looking Puma... I suspect that Deutsche blade makers figured out their craft long, long ago...
     
  14. D.B. Cooper

    D.B. Cooper Member

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    Funny, but I hope not.
     
  15. joneb

    joneb Member

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    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
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  16. dvcrsn

    dvcrsn Member

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    you should seriously consider an Opinel since the beech models can be had for less than $25 and all of them are very light
     
  17. D.B. Cooper

    D.B. Cooper Member

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    I used to own one of those. Wonder what happened to it. No bother, I replaced it with my One-Handed Trekker. The only thing I ever used the saw for, on any of my SAKs was when I was teaching Wilderness Survival Merit Badge, and I used it to cut branches to build a shelter.
     
  18. labnoti

    labnoti Member

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    The saw is unuseful. A palm-wide knife blade can cut up to wrist-thick branches easily enough -- cutting at an oblique angle like a beaver, not perpendicular obviously. For anything that thick or thicker, a hatchet, axe or saw is preferred. For a saw, a Bahco Laplander would be my minimum. I typically use a 14" folding pruning saw or a Sven Saw -- great to keep in the 4x4, but not an EDC pocket item. Also, saws are not as good a gift as a knife.
     
  19. D.B. Cooper

    D.B. Cooper Member

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    Depends. I wouldn't mind getting a Stihl 271 Farm Boss for my next birth day.
     
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  20. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    There are many of us that carry SAKs (I carry a 20 year old Master Craftsman), but their lack of a lock is a problem as well.

    Perhaps the better question we should be asking is, what will he do with the knife? Sounds like a suburban/city kid. If he hasn't had a pocket knife since he came back from Scout camp then he may not have any interest in one. If that's the case, simple becomes important and a lock doubly so (at least from my experience). The recommendation of the stainless Opinels could be just the ticket if he's not a hiker, but the locks are manual and would require him to take that action on his own.
     
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  21. D.B. Cooper

    D.B. Cooper Member

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    Oh he doesn't have any interest in one. Ask him what we wants for his birthday, he'll tell you a list of 50 video game titles on 4 different gaming systems. (And I plan to get him a gift card to Game Stop.) But my theme for his 18th birthday is adulthood. I'm prepping him with things every man should have. What he does with it is an entirely different discussion.

    On a related side note, I'm also starting an IRA account for him, co-signing a credit card, registering him to vote and for the draft. It's going to be a busy day.

    But you're right the SAK and the lock. I much much prefer a locking blade, hence the reason I own one of the very few SAKs with a locking blade. I do see the value in that, so, on that note, I think my short list is:

    SAK Alox Pioneer, Buck 055, Kershaw Leek, Leatherman Skeletool.

    I left off the Opinel because it's not USA made. SAKs are the only imported knives I've ever owned, and USA made was part of my original list of qualities I was looking for.
     
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  22. labnoti

    labnoti Member

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    Right on. I've done the same thing with my nephews. One is about to turn 18 and the other is 20. They visited with their parents for a weekend this summer and I sent them home with knives, zippo lighters and fountain pens. Of course, I tried to get them to go shooting while they were here, but they weren't really interested. I've previously given them things like a hatchet or tomahawk, and wristwatches, analog ones. Do kids even know how to read those anymore, or do they just ask Siri/Google/Alexa what time it is? I would have given them tools, but I know they just take their Hyundai to Jiffy Lube and there are Mexicans that come mow their lawn. I'd give them straight razors like I used to use, but I know they wouldn't use them, and at this point I'd rather they just follow my example and grow a beard.

    Some day I will give them a gun, probably a revolver, whether they want it or not. I wouldn't give them one at their present age without the opportunity to train them but at some point, they'll have to take that responsibility for themselves. I see myself as kind of like Ames Jainchill.
     
  23. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Careful about abandoning allies just because theyre behind enemy lines. I know the Ontario folks and they deserve much more respect than that.
     
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  24. ugaarguy

    ugaarguy Moderator Staff Member

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    Buck stagnated. They failed to keep pace with the market. Almost 40 years ago, Spyderco introduced their first knife, the Worker. It had a fine tipped blade, and was marketed as a work knife, not a tactical knife, even though it featured the one hand opening hole and had a pocket clip for easier carry. Let's be honest, we carry folding knives because they're convenient. A good quality paring knife or a bird & trout type fixed blade would be great for most EDC tasks, but even in a good sheath they're less convenient to carry than a folder. Since I'm carrying a folder for convenience, why would I give up features like a pocket clip and one hand opening that make the knife more convenient to carry, and easier to use?

    Are the Buck 112 Slim Ranger Select and 110 Slim Select suddenly tactical knives because they added thumb studs and pocket clips to them? Ohh, and they come in bright, friendly colors like red, blue, and yellow now in addition to boring black. Or is the black plastic handled one the tactical one because of the color?
     
  25. D.B. Cooper

    D.B. Cooper Member

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    Genius. That statement just bumped the Buck off my short list. Thanks for the perspective.
     
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