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Edumacate me on jeweled rifle bolts...

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Regolith, Apr 2, 2008.

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  1. Regolith

    Regolith Member

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    Why jewel them? Is there a performance increase, or is it purely aesthetic? I tried to do a search on google and these forums for this info, but couldn't find anything...
     
  2. kingjoey

    kingjoey member

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    It is a cosmetic thing. Years ago it was done to beautify otherwise crappy machining. The jeweling disguised poor castings or rough machining marks on parts. Now it is the vogue thing to do :rolleyes:
     
  3. jdc1244

    jdc1244 Member

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    I’m not saying this is true nor would I pay to have it done but some maintain it retains an even film of oil on the entire bolt for smoother operation.
     
  4. shootr

    shootr Member

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    What JDC said.

    I've heard it more than once. IMHO, it's purty too! Kinda like chrome on a motorsickle.
     
  5. PTK

    PTK Member

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    That's untrue - you cannot jewel "crappy" machining. You have to have what is known as a matchless finish (mirror) to jewel metal. As jdc1244, the jeweling may retain a film of oil.
     
  6. jrfoxx

    jrfoxx Member

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    Is what's called jeweling the diamond like patterns on the outside finish on some bolts? My Win model 70 has that, and I really kinda like the looks of it. Never really know what it was called though.I'd post a pic to explain what I'm referring too, but the one pic I have access to you cant really see it, and I'm at work, so cant take another right now....
     
  7. PTK

    PTK Member

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    Link

    When searching for jeweling, it's easier to search for engine turning. Same thing.
     
  8. kingjoey

    kingjoey member

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    For "jeweling" as you see it today, yes you have to have a mirror finish because it is a cosmetic feature. On older guns (particularily inexpensive pistols from Belgium and Germany) they jewelled them to hide machining marks and other defects. The jeweling pattern hid the various casting and handling marks on parts.
     
  9. jrfoxx

    jrfoxx Member

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    Thanks.It is what I thought....
    Didnt now about "engine turning". Thanks for that. I was gettng everyhting BUT what I wanted looking up "jeweling"....
    Thats what my model 70 has. I really think its neat.
     
  10. tasco 74

    tasco 74 Member

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    when i sent my 1022 bolt to randy at CPC to get it redone jeweling was offered at no extra cost.... i'm glad he did it... dresses up the 1022 cutom even more....
     
  11. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Engine turning ("jewelling") was first used on the inside of locks, especially on high grade shotguns, to retain oil. Externally, it serves little purpose except decoration.

    Jewelling is composed of fine, shallow scratches and in most rifles bolt jewelling will soon wear from the movement of the bolt, leaving the bolt looking worse than if it had no jewelling at all. IMHO, it is fine for a rifle that is going into a museum cabinet; for a using rifle, it is a waste of money.

    Jim
     
  12. Geno
    • Contributing Member

    Geno Member

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    I had my Weatherby Mark V's bolt jeweled. It made it as-slick-as oiled glass. If you have the extra money, it's worth it. If you don't have the extra money, you can live without it.
     
  13. Float Pilot

    Float Pilot Member

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    WHen I was taught how to do it back in the early 70s, I was told that jewelling provided three things.

    1. Retains a coat of oil.
    2. Hides the wear marks from bolt useage.
    3. Looks cool and cost the customer more money.

    Here is the first bolt I ever Jewelled. It is on a customized M-98 Mauser that I have shot and hunted with since 1973.

    Some people don't like it. Some folks do...
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2008
  14. cracked butt

    cracked butt Member

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    I'd buy into the idea that it holds oil- the same thing is done to the inside of cylinders of a combustion engine when its rebuilt- the cylinders are 'honed' to provide a crosshatch pattern in oder to hold a thin film of oil.
     
  15. DaveInFloweryBranchGA

    DaveInFloweryBranchGA Member

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    Looks nice, holds oil, hides ugly machining marks on cheap guns and can be used as a profit making item on a custom gun.

    Dave
     
  16. PotatoJudge

    PotatoJudge Member

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    I like the look of it in cars and guns if done tastefully. Never really seen a revolver with a hammer and trigger done that I thought looked right, but rifle bolts with nice blueing and walnut seems to work.
    I was looking into having my dad's old rem 700 reblued and wanted to have the nearly completely worn jeweling recut. The local smith said he didn't offer it anymore because the time involved priced it out of peoples' range. He actually mentioned wanting to sell off his tooling.

    It'd be nice if somebody here took up jeweling as a hobby and offered it to members. Not sure they'd make much money for their time, but they'd probably get a lot of business.
     
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