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Emergency heating equipment?

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics and Training' started by Optical Serenity, Mar 30, 2006.

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  1. Optical Serenity

    Optical Serenity Member

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    Most of us have a reflective emergency blanket or two in our BOB's, but what else is there. I keep trying to look through military surplus websites (anyone recommend a good one?) and sporting goods stores, but I want some suggestions.

    Lets stick to stuff for a BOB, not for larger type packs.

    I also keep 6 hand warmers in my maxpedition fatboy jumbo at all times. Its not much heat, but it does feel good.
     
  2. ball3006

    ball3006 Member

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    A GI poncho liner....

    is something to consider. I keep an old GI footlocker in my truck containing a tent, stove, lantern, change of clothes, poncho and liner, tarp, ammo, dried food, and a bottle of whisky. There is always a case of water in the back of the truck too.......If I need to boogie, it is only 120 miles to my camp, which is stocked for a duration......chris3
     
  3. CoachVince

    CoachVince Member

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  4. Thefabulousfink

    Thefabulousfink Member

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    A wool blanket of some sort. Wool can be bulky, so that migh rule it out for some BOB's but it is reasonably cheep and it will keep you warm even when it is soaking wet (cotton won't). If your looking for a light weight backpack style then a blanket is probably to big, but its not a bad thing to have in you car.

    If your looking for lighter weight stuff then try some of the military's new cold weather underware. It is very nice.
     
  5. SRYnidan

    SRYnidan Member

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    There are a couple of good ideas I have seen over the years.
    I have carried a couple of the pocket hand warmers that use solid fuel (charcoal).
    They and the fuel keep well for a long time aren’t messy and put out a good deal of heat.

    The second idea comes from a cold weather kit I saw and copied when I lived in a colder location. Take a 30 cal ammo can an clean it out real well. Then using a rod hang 4 pieces of wicking evenly spaced down the center line of the can. Fill the can 2/3 to ¾ full with paraffin (the sheet metal box makes a great heater and burns a long time). The empty space is great for a couple of space blankets, matches 50’ of para cord and a couple of stick-on carbon monoxide detectors.
     
  6. odysseus

    odysseus Member

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    Since your restricting it to a BOB, a few things I would consider.

    Something wet wicking for your head. A lot of body heat is lost from the head.

    I have a synthetic outdoor sleeping bag, compresses very small, very light. This is the most valuable part as rest and staying warm is essential. Obviously get a warmer one as you need. It is easier to vent warmth than keep the cold out.

    Gloves would be good, extra wicking socks.

    Flame material to make fire in less then perfect conditions. There are a variety of good fuel and fire sources, and some have written here.

    In rainy areas, something to keep pouring rain off of you when you are resting.
     
  7. NMshooter

    NMshooter Member

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    Tarps with an aluminized lining are available.

    A candle will work well with space blankets and similar reflectors, it takes a while but you will warm up eventually. You sit on something that insulates you from the ground, wrap the blanket around you, and plant the candle in front of you underneath the blanket.

    Candles are also useful as firestarters, and of course light sources.

    You can also get reusable heating packs, they use an exothermic chemical reaction to create heat. Afterwards you can boil them in a pan of water to change the crystallized solution back to a liquid.

    The tarp and heat packs can be found at www.actiongear.com
     
  8. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Member

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    They work well. If you are going to use one with a bulk propane (20# or more) tank, be sure to get the filter to put between the tank and the heater.

    Pilgrim
     
  9. karlsgunbunker

    karlsgunbunker Member

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  10. Optical Serenity

    Optical Serenity Member

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    That is an interesting hand warmer with the fuel sticks.

    So, if you use a candle, two questions:

    1. How do you keep candles from melting while they are in a hot car during the summer (high temps)?

    and

    2. How do you keep the candle's flame from starting a fire if you have it inside your blanket with you?
     
  11. Bob F.

    Bob F. Member

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    Read an article yrs ago about an old timer who winter camped with bivy tent and light sleeping bag--- dog(border collie?) crawled into sleeping bag with him, plenty of heat. Might not stay in BOB though! Keep a big candle in my truck, gotta crack a window though.

    Bob
     
  12. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Member

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    I have made 4-wick candles out of coffee cans, but never thought of the GI ammo can. Good idea.

    I use wax toilet seals instead of parafin. Much cheaper and easier to work with.

    Pops
     
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