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Endshake?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by jski, Mar 17, 2018.

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  1. jski

    jski Member

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    Got this caveat on another website. Did a web search on "endshake" but found little. Anyone care to elaborate?
     
  2. mnrivrat

    mnrivrat Member

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    What you found explains it pretty well. Simply put, end shake is the amount of back and forth movement of the cylinder.
     
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  3. Col. Harrumph

    Col. Harrumph Member

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    Yup, what mnrivat said. If the gap is too small you may get a buildup of crud (and lead, if shooting plain lead) on the face of the forcing cone which will eventually impede the cylinder's rotation. If too large you'll experience excessive gas escaping through the gap. Excessive endshake can be corrected with shims, or on some revolvers (S&W for ex.) by moving metal to increase the length of the yoke shaft (the smaller diameter of part 31 on this diagram: https://www.gunpartscorp.com/gun-manufacturer/smith-wesson/revolvers-sw/10-1)
     
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  4. boom boom
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    boom boom Contributing Member

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    FWIW, it is pretty easy to detect using common feeler gages that you can find at auto parts stores and not that hard to fix. Brownells has the tools and parts to do so.
     
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  5. jski

    jski Member

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    So endshake is simply the distance the cylinder slides up and down the cylinder pin?

    I presume this only applies to single shot revolvers?

    BTW, with my .30 Carbine Blackhawk there appears to be zero sliding/slop.
     
  6. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    Happens on modern DA revolvers too.
     
  7. BBBBill

    BBBBill Member

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    Better described as the distance that it moves fore and aft in the frame window.

    Nope. All revolvers.

    There should be a tiny amount. I set mine at .001" minimum - .002" maximum. Zero will lead to cylinder bind from heating and expansion if you shoot enough rounds fast enough. Even one cylinder full can do it. There are other things that can cause the cylinder to bind up and zero endshake can make it much more likely to happen, especially if the cylinder face is a little high in one or more spots. Then the face of the cylinder can bind against the rear face of the barrel and cock to one side. With zero endshake there is no wiggle room to accommodate the minor irregularities. Lots of little points of fit and/or interference add up. Of course a pro smith will include facing the cylinder to remove high spots as well as fitting the ratchet pads, hand/pawl, cylinder stop, end shake, headspace, etc on a full build.
     
  8. Jim K

    Jim K Member.

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    Some confusion here with "end shake", barrel/cylinder gap, and cylinder clearance at either or both ends. Not the same things, though often related.

    The .30 carbine revolvers are especially prone to problems because the recoil is really more than any current revolver was designed for.

    Jim.
     
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  9. jski

    jski Member

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    Could you be more precise here, more descriptive?
     
  10. jski

    jski Member

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    There is a barely noticeable amount of slop/slip with the cylinder but it is very slight.
     
  11. BBBBill

    BBBBill Member

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    A gun is a piece of precision equipment and fit/dimensions should be quantified by actual measurements. Simple enough to measure with feeler gauges, micrometers, and quality dial calipers. I can't quantify "barely noticeable" in any meaningful way.
     
  12. jski

    jski Member

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    Fair enough. Could you suggest a good gap gauge for this (and other) purpose(s)?

    Most are of the ilk: "0.02 to 1mm Thickness Gap Metric Filler Gauge". What is a good range of (thickness) values for gunsmithing?

    Update: I've read that the top of the line is:
    Starrett 66 Thickness Gage Set With Straight Leaves, 0.0015-0.025" Thickness, 3-1/32" Length, 26 Leaves ? Ain't cheap.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2018
  13. BBBBill

    BBBBill Member

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    You don't need Starrett brand. A basic set of automotive feeler gauges from Auto Zone, etc will do just fine. The standard range starts at .0015" thick up through about .025". You can stack them to come up with different values to for those not included in the set. I have several standard sized sets (1/2" wide blades) as well as a mini set with narrow (1/4" wide blades) for getting into restricted spaces. Should be able to pick up a set for less than $8.00. It is nice to have two sets handy.
     
  14. jski

    jski Member

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    Went ahead and ordered the Starrett set. Occasionally I feel the urge to buy American and then I'm compelled to scratch that itch. It's good to know we still make the highest quality machined tools. I'll hand it down to posterity.
    7185kqoUTcL._SL1500_.jpg
    As you can tell from my avatar, I'm a big fan of Shane where one of the major characters is named Joe Starrett. That cinched it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2018
  15. jski

    jski Member

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    BTW, it appears the gunsmithing world continues to use the U.S. Standard units of measure? Traditional, I like that.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2018
  16. BBBBill

    BBBBill Member

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    If you are serious about understanding you Ruger, whether you intend to actually do the work on it or not, then you need to add this book to your gun library - The Ruger Single Action Revolvers: A Shop Manual, Vols. 1&2 http://www.gunbooks.com/ruger_sa.html
     
  17. jski

    jski Member

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    On Amazon that book received 27 5-star reviews. Incredible. Appears to be an excellent tome on the subject. Think I'll get it. Thanks.
     
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