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Exactly one year with the M&P

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by ny32182, Nov 1, 2012.

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  1. ny32182

    ny32182 Member

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    No problem JA, if everything falls apart after 5k next time that will be my new change interval. :)

    As far as I know now I'll be shooting this same gun next year so should be into the upper 30's on it by October '13.

    One more comment on this gun vs. the Glock; there is a whole lot I like about the Glock such as the size/shape/width of the frame, and even the "grip angle" that seems to cause so much knashing of teeth from many. I also like the push pins vs. the M&P roll pins, making it easier to disassemble, and also the ability to get the striker block safety out with no fanfare is nice vs. the M&P. It is also a simpler, slightly more rugged design IMO as noted above. I also think it shoots "flatter", (comes back on target quicker and smoother) than the M&P which seems to have a little more front sight bounce on the return. Push comes to shove I couldn't show that this has an impact on my shooting; it is still settled by the time I'm ready to shoot again; it is just very slightly annoying is all.

    My two key issues with the Glock are that I'm a lefty (no ambi slide catch available) and also as soon as I started doing dedicated gripper/forearm exersizes to improve pistol handling, I started getting very bad slide bite off the Glock, so long term I would have had to go to a beavertail option of some kind on the Glock. The M&P has it from the factory. What I do to compensate for the super-slim frame of the M&P is to put on the SMALL backstrap without the bulbous palm bulge, and then build up the ENTIRE grip with lots and lots of grip tape all the way around. This gives a uniform increase in size vs. the large backstrap with just makes it feel like you're gripping a golf ball and still doesn't give you anything to grab on the front strap.
     
  2. Trent

    Trent Resident Wiseguy

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    Great review!

    The aftermarket recoil spring still holding up good? Or is it starting to feel weaker?
     
  3. ny32182

    ny32182 Member

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    I've been using the ISMI recoil springs for quite a while (used them in my G34 too).

    I used to change them every 5k just because I read that was when it was supposed to be done. I could never feel any difference between the outgoing and incoming springs though, when I changed them, so I stopped over the summer. The one currently in my M&P has 12k+ on it and feels just like it did the day I dropped it in. I've read multiple people say they put 50k+ on one. I'm just going to let it ride until I think it is causing problems. And keep in mind that is a 13lb spring already much lighter than factory.
     
  4. Trent

    Trent Resident Wiseguy

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    Thanks. I've been running stock Glock recoil springs in my G21, found I have to change them out about every 25k or so. Gun doesn't stop working but there's a noticeable sluggishness, and it makes me worry about failure to feed.

    I'm coming up on that mark again next year so I might go aftermarket. Only problem there is switching from a "known" to an "unknown" I don't really know if I'll be better or worse off. :)
     
  5. ny32182

    ny32182 Member

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    I've had nothing but perfect experience with every ISMI spring I've ever used.

    Changing the rate, obviously you are impacting how the pistol performs but the springs themselves have been fine. I've yet to put 25k on one though.
     
  6. Trent

    Trent Resident Wiseguy

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    What's the stock spring rate on the M&P? What was the purpose with selecting the lighter 13lb spring? Are you shooting lighter than standard loads?
     
  7. ny32182

    ny32182 Member

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    I think the stock spring is 17lb which is designed for duty power ammo...

    I use a 13lb in competition for two reasons; first it results in less "sight dip" on the return (keeps the slide flatter) and also it will definitely cycle with my ~129pf competition loads, which are on the light side compared to most factory ammo. The 17lb is a little strong for them; it will function for me at least when it is clean, but one time when I'd first got it, a newbie female was shooting it with the stock spring and match loads, and was getting limp-wrist related stovepipes.
     
  8. Trent

    Trent Resident Wiseguy

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    That makes sense. It's probably a bit light to fire full power rounds for long - might be why they have the "5K round" change rate recommendation on them.

    With my Glock 21 I usually know it's time to replace the recoil spring when it starts putting brass down the front of my shirt. Spring strength plays a large role in ejection timing on some guns. When the spring gets weak on the Glock the slide travels back faster, imparting more energy between the ejector and the brass; makes it flip more "up and back" instead of to the side.

    I've got an M&P 45 but I've only put (maybe) 500 rounds through it. I just couldn't get used to the trigger. I took it out a few weekends for practice, then tried it in major auto on a pin shoot and .. results were unsatisfactory. I've never had to actually stop and reload on a pin shoot before. I just put the (now empty) gun down and said "mark me at 30." :)

    If I took the time to get used to the trigger, I know it'd be a great gun - every bit as accurate and comfortable as my other favorites when I'm not "shooting on the clock". Would definitely give the accuracy edge to my USP 45, but "the brick", as I like to call it, has horrendous muzzle flip due to the high sitting slide. My Springfield 1911 is the best of all worlds speed-wise, great shooting gun, easy to control, but heavy, and limited ammo capacity is a bit of a turnoff for me.

    M&P is a fine handgun, thanks for the review and follow up. I think you've inspired me to give mine another chance next season.
     
  9. ny32182

    ny32182 Member

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    Quick update; round count is now 24.5K, and I just broke the original factory slide catch... the left side thumb pad broke off. The part is actually still functional at locking the slide open, but for a right handed shooter, would require a slide rack to get it back into battery from slidelock (if the slide didn't drop on its own).

    As a lefty it doesn't impact me at all, but isn't strictly competition legal so I am going to replace it with a new one today.

    The rest of my "new" maintenance schedule has been perfect and the gun is running great; and I haven't broken anything else since adopting it.

    I did also change the 13lb spring after 15k rounds, and went to an 11lb spring. Gun also runs fine with this spring, though I found out (unfortunately at a major match) any bump to the muzzle, such as opening a port with it, will knock it out of battery with the 11lb spring. I never tried that with a 13lb.
     
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