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Expert question; Modifying .460 Rowland.

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by 20nickels, Jun 12, 2007.

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  1. 20nickels

    20nickels Member

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    Neither the writer, The High Road, nor the staff of THR assume any liability for any damage or injury resulting from use of this information. Do not use this info for standard .45ACP caliber firearms, doing so is completely disregarding your safety and of those around you.

    Excerpt;
    "The only purpose served by the extended Rowland case is to prevent it from being chambered in guns not properly prepared to handle the cartridge"
    The 460 Rowland...Whoa Mama! Part 1
    http://www.realguns.com/archives/106.htm

    So if the Bullet is seated to the same length and depth as the .45ACP, +P, and Super could you just trim the .460 case down and chamber the round in a gun PROPERLY set up to handle these pressures such as a .45ACP Revolver?
    This seems to be a cheaper/easier way to take advantage of the .460 Rowland without sending it out to a gunsmith to rechamber the cylinder.
    http://www.clarkcustomguns.com/revserv.htm#rowland.

    I do not own any .45 auto pistols so there would be no danger in mixing this CLEARLY marked ammo with the wrong firearm. Thanks, Nickels.
     
  2. 20nickels

    20nickels Member

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    :uhoh:Nobody wants to touch this one?
     
  3. RecoilRob

    RecoilRob Member

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    After reading through the article, it seems that you certainly could load standard length cases in a 'properly set up gun'.

    The Rowland brass is supposedly heat treated differently but I don't know how much of a difference it really makes.

    But, the question that comes to mind is how do you know the chamber can tolerate the extra pressures of this cartridge? If it can, no problemo. If it cannot, ouch!
     
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