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Extending an invitation to go shooting...

Discussion in 'Activism Discussion and Planning' started by sota, Jan 2, 2013.

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  1. sota

    sota Member

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    I'm trying to be pro-active and help create more of an understanding about firearms so that people I meet are not so anti. Basically I'm applying the theory of people are more afraid of the unknown than the known. To that end I'd like to start actively inviting people to go with me to the range and experience firearms in a safe and controlled environment.
    I've thought about ordering up business cards from say vistaprint with something of the vein "An open invitation for you and a friend to visit my range with me."
    I figure the presentation of such a card would be a fairly non-threatening method versus going "HEY YOU WANNA GO SHOOTING!?!" I would be refraining from any discussions about firearms policy, events or other sensitive topics. The goal isn't to argue but to introduce them to an actual firearm... as I strongly suspect there's a great number of people in my area who have never even SEEN a firearm in person, much less been present to one being fired.

    What are people's thoughts. Is anyone else doing this? What methods or techniques are you employing that have been successful? Again this isn't to turn everyone into a "gun lover" but to at least provide a positive demonstration that it might not be necessary to be a "gun hater".
     
  2. p2000sk

    p2000sk Member

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    Love the idea about a card.
    There are two seperate people who I invited, one a fence sitter and the other a stern anti. Not only did they have a great time, they both came to be pro-firearm and good friends to me.
    A short time later I went with one of them on a trip to the BGS (Best Gun Store in my opinion) where he purchased his first firearms, a CZ VZ-58 and some handgun.
     
  3. sota

    sota Member

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    any thoughts on the wording?
     
  4. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    I've always made the invitation based on a conversational opportunity.

    The 3 young tellers at the CU got interested when I mentioned the gun show. They all 3 became animated and somewhat agitated over the idea of blame being put on firearms instead of the madman who murdered the children at Sandy Hook. I pointed out that I taught people to shoot and that they were all welcome to come to my range and I'd help them get started. They were all 3 enthusiastic over the idea.

    For a card I'd suggest something people are familiar with already. "FREE range session with firearms safety". Tell them that it is FREE! and people react to familiar marketing programming.
     
  5. bdgackle

    bdgackle Member

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    I'll echo that this is a great idea -- a fun day at the range is the single most effective "argument" I've ever used. The most important things are that the new person feels (and of course IS) safe, and has a good time. Help them understand the 4 rules, make sure they know exactly what to expect, and work up slowly in the recoil department. Reactive targets of any kind are a bonus, if your range allows them -- most people seem to enjoy blowing up coke cans and making things spin.

    There are plenty of rational arguments for our RKBA, but at the end of the day, most people go with their gut instincts and then cherry pick facts to support that position.

    The basic position of the antis is an emotional argument that "Guns are scary". Our counter argument boils down to a rational "Guns are useful". This would be better received if paired with a fundamental message that "Guns are FUN". If someone leaves that range wanting to own a gun, even if for no other reason than simple recreation, you won't need to convince them of the facts anymore -- they'll jump online and convince themselves. I'm in no way arguing that the RKBA is merely a recreational tool -- just that this is the best initial argument to get people past fear and confirmation bias.

    I think sometimes that the constant need to defend the utility of our hobby gets in the way of sharing the joy it can bring us.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2013
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