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Feeding Issues On A Jennings 9mm

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by T-man18, Oct 24, 2006.

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  1. T-man18

    T-man18 Member

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    A friend of mine purchased a Jennings 9mm pistol(Not sure what model it is) and it is every third shot it loads the rounds incorrectly sometimes it turns the bullet horizontal so that the primer is sticking straight up it also turns the round to the side. I would also like information on the pistol and disassembly intructions?
     
  2. wolf_from_wv

    wolf_from_wv Member

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    What does the back of the slide look like?
     
  3. The_Antibubba

    The_Antibubba Member

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    Actually, being able to fire 2 out of 3 rounds on a Jennings is quite good-don't mess with it! ;)
     
  4. evan price

    evan price Member

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    The problem is the slide. It has "Jennings" etched into the metal instead of Glock or Sig... Be lucky it fires at all. (From the man who owns a Jennings)

    Sorry.
     
  5. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Hi, T-man18,

    As you can gather from the comments, Jennings guns do not have a good reputation. That Jennings Nine is made for a cartridge called the 9mm Short in Europe, but normally called the .380 ACP in the U.S. Typically Jennings, they called it a 9mm and if buyers wanted to think it was 9mm Luger, it was OK with the company.

    Jennings went out of business several years ago, but the assets were bought by a man named Jimenez who restarted production in CA of that and a couple of other models. In 2005, the state of California banned manufacture and sale of all the Jimenez line as dangerous after the guns came apart in testing. They were going to move production to Nevada, but I don't know if they did. I can't find a company web site or any current information on the company or current production, if any.

    It sounds like you need a new magazine, which may be very hard to find.

    Takedown is done by pushing the takedown button on the left rear of the frame and then pulling the slide up and easing it forward over the barrel.

    My recommendation is that you retire that Jennings (or sell it to someone you don't much like) and buy a more reliable gun.

    HTH

    Jim
     
  6. wolf_from_wv

    wolf_from_wv Member

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  7. provgencon

    provgencon Member

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    jennings nine- nickel

    i recently purchased two Bryco's, the Jennings Nine, and the T380 slim frame: both in a Nickel Finish. Mr. Keenan earlier mentioned that the Jennings Nine is Actually chambered for a european caliber, and that the American .380 caliber is the manufacturers intended ammo caliber for this model.
    am i getting this right? can this be officially verified? I have not fired these guns yet, just want to be cautious.
    thank you.
     
  8. Ron James

    Ron James Member

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    (The 380 ACP,9X17,9MM Corta, and the 9MM Kurz are the one and the same.
    Kurz and Corta both translate to " short".
     
  9. provgencon

    provgencon Member

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    .380 ACP---9 mm bryco

    shall i purchase .380 acp ammo for this jennings nine then? can anyone help me confirm that the Jennings nine is chambered for a 9mm short, european round?
     
  10. Ron James

    Ron James Member

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    Lets try this again. Yes, you can purchase 380 ACP for your Jennings. The European 9MM Short is the same as .380. As being chambered for the .380, it should be, I believe it is, both the Bryco Models 38 and 48 were .380, if it reads 9MM on the slide then it 's .380, but with out seeing it in person, I would advise this: If you have any doubt as to the proper caliber, then take it to a gun store. But first put it in a gun pouch, you don't to be waving a firearm around in these days and times. By the way Jennings firearms was the distributer, Bryco was the manufacturer. Also I believe that the little dohicky pin like thing sticking out the back is the take down. push it in with a ball point pin and the slide should come off. And if you're not carefull so will the springs. If I'm wrong on this , please, someone correct me.
     
  11. provgencon

    provgencon Member

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    380-9mm short

    thank you for the painfully clear explaination.... i needed that:) . i was just hoping to find some means of actually verifying the intended caliber of ammo. Your theory for why the Jennings nine Jams so frequently is very convincing, but before i tell ALL my friends to switch to the .380 ACP ammo for their Jennings nine, i would Like to be able to back my story.
    thank you again sir.
     
  12. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    I think the correct version is that Bryco/Jennings decided to make a pistol with more power than the .25 and .22 pistols they had been making. Since the most popular center-fire auto pistol round was the 9mm Luger (as it is called here), they wanted to trade on the term "9mm". But there was no way their blowback design and cheap materials could handle 9mm Luger. So, knowing that the .380 ACP was called the 9mm Browning Short in Europe, they borrowed the "9mm" part and so marked the guns.

    It was deception, pure and simple, as the intent was to leave the buyer under the impression he was getting the powerful 9mm Luger caliber when in fact he was getting the much less powerful .380 ACP. A bit like putting a Mercedes tristar on the hood of a Yugo, but some buyers were fooled.

    The .380 ACP is not really European; it was developed here by Browning, but as in many cases, European use meant changing the name to a metric designation.

    Your friends must have been using .380 ACP, as there is no way a 9mm Luger round could fit and fire in that gun; if somehow it did, the shooter would know right away as the gun would come apart.

    Jim
     
  13. AJAX22

    AJAX22 Member

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    I used to own a bryco jennings 9, mine was made in california and it was chambered in 9mm luger.

    If it's just a jennings, and not a bryco/jennings, its probably a 380, but if it's a bryco jennings nine it can be a real 9mm

    btw it was a flaming piece of junk, the internal pins have a tendancy to drift, which causes them to not fire, the safety and firing mechanism are made out of sheet metal and the magazine latch spring can escape from where the cheep plastic grips pin it against the frame.

    Mine would stovepipe the second round if it was loaded to capacity (12 rounds) I loaded it to 10 or 11 and had no problems.

    To fix the internal pin drift that plagued it I sweat soddered the pins in place.

    I've never been so glad to get rid of a firearm as I was to off that hunk of potmetal. and I've owned raven .25's and jennings .22's

    none of which was as unreliable and prone to dangerous malfunction as that bryco/jennings nine
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2006
  14. wolf_from_wv

    wolf_from_wv Member

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    My uncle's 9mm Luger Jennings had to be sent back a few times before it worked right.
     
  15. provgencon

    provgencon Member

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    Luger vs. Short

    thank you all for your replies.... very helpful.
     
  16. Pilot1559

    Pilot1559 Member

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    Did anybody actually fire a Jenny Nine?

    Let me begin with…Sorry this is so long, then let me say that I am well aware of the age of this thread, but I read it a few years ago and it stuck in my head to this very day….I just had to reply.



    So I bought this Jennings 9mm in 2001, it was the first handgun I had ever purchased, I had just move to Pennsylvania from New Jersey and wanted to see what it was like to actually purchase a handgun with just a credit card and a driver's license. It's funny what being repressed will do to your psyche when you are released from your bonds. Anyway, I slapped down the card and charged the 80 or so dollars for this gun that I didn't really have any intention of firing. It ended up going into a lockbox and sat for six years before I even looked at it again; I almost forgot I had it. In the six years that had passed, I purchased a Glock 36, A Ruger SP101 a Walther P99 and a couple of shotguns. The only gun I actually fired before today was one of the shotguns when I went duck and goose hunting. I wanted to fire all of them, just never got to the range. About two months ago, I went ahead and ordered the Walther, and it finally came in about a week ago (boy, these are getting hard to come by).

    Oh and did I mention, I moved back to Jersey in 2002 so the Walther story actually started in September when I applied for a handgun purchase permit. The Glock I sold just before I moved back to Jersey, and I sold one of the shotguns (The Browning Hunter Gold 12ga with the neon sights) to a friend that I was hunting with when I lived in PA. I miss those guns, they were 2 of the best that money could buy, unfortunately, money was my reason for having to sell them in the first place.

    So I finally made it to the range today. I packed my gun case with my little Ruger SP101, My shiny new Walther P99 AS, and my like new, six year old, never fired 80 dollar Jennings Nine. Honestly, I didn't really have any intentions of firing the 9mm, I don't even know why I packed it into the case in the first place. I guess having 3 guns in the large 6 gun case would look better than if I had 2 in the event someone happened to look when I opened the case, vanity is a bitch.

    Anyway, after firing the Ruger and pounding the hell out of my knuckles with the trigger guard because I decided to fire .357 magnum loads, 158 Grain Jacketed rounds to be exact. I wanted to know what kind of power this little monster had, all I can say is, Holy Crap!

    First, let me state that I read this thread a few years ago, and you guys scared the crap out of me. Now, getting back to the point of this post, the Jenny. Here I am 3 guns, I had fired 2 and I'm thinking, what is the worst thing that could happen? A jam, miss-fire, miss-feed. In any case, it is unlikely that the gun will blow up like some type of Bugs Bunny, Elmer Fudd cartoon where the barrel miraculously separates apart as easy as a banana skin peeling away from its fruit. I load the magazine with 10 rounds and slide it into the handle of the gun, and I prey a little prayer to myself, after all I am about as religious as Elliot Spitzer on a binge with high priced hookers. I pull the slide back and release, kick down the safety with my thumb, and I gently squeeze the trigger. To my surprise, the gun actually fired, not in some messy carbon black disaster as I had expected, but rather, a normal 9mm semi auto handgun kind of kick, which was nearly nothing. So I did it again, and again and again.


    I switched between guns after emptying a magazine or the chambers on my revolver, whatever the case may have been. In all, I put 150 rounds through the Jenny, and I only had 2 miss feeds that simply required me to pull back on the slide just enough to allow the cartridge to correct its position. Not bad considering the gun cost less than most good bb guns.

    I got home and disassembled the gun to clean, using the takedown to allow the slide to come away from the frame. The takedown is the lever on the side of the gun that releases the slide when the slide is in the full back locked position. I would not recommend poking at the loaded or cocked indicators (the little red buttons) to disassemble the gun, only bad things can happen when you do that.

    I guess the moral of the story is, sometimes you just have to see for yourself. Some people say this gun is the best, or that gun is the best. Most just because they heard it somewhere, or someone told them back when they didn't know any better, some still don't. I'm not saying that a Jennings is a great gun, nor is it reliable. But for me, it was actually a lot of fun to fire, and it worked well enough to know that I paid 80 bucks for a handgun that to be honest, was worth every penny.:D
     
  17. emersone

    emersone Member

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    dido

    I received my Jennings as a gift for my first handgun. I have fired probably 500 rounds through it. I have only had probably six jams which was caused by a bad magazine. I was able to bend the edges on the magazine to make this problem disappear. I am probably going to polish the fed ramp next. some then might call it polishing a turd, but it is a fun and relatively accurate gun to shoot.
     
  18. TheProf

    TheProf Member

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    Handguns of low quality are dangerous. And as you can tell by the previous posts... Jennings are of a questionable brand (that's putting it mildly). Perhaps you should consider just taking the thing apart, mixing it with cement (rendering it useless) and burying it. This would be for your safety and for those around you. I say this kindly and with respect. I wouldn't want anyone hurt by a low quality handgun.

    I would not sell such a gun to anyone. I would consider it unethical. (plus...there's the legality factor of being sued by the buyer... I know that just sounded silly...but nowadays, anyone can be sued by anybody...)
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2009
  19. a5werkes

    a5werkes Member

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    Mom taught me not to say anything if it wasn't nice....so, I'll keep mom happy and let this reporter do the talking.

    9mm malfunctions at Lakeland gun range, shoots three people

    By Chandra Broadwater, Times Staff Writer 
In Print: Monday, October 5, 2009

    TAMPA — Michael Thourot had just pulled his hand away from the warm metal when it started spewing bullets.
    Moments before, Sherri Thourot had watched her husband fire and reload the Jennings 9mm. Then he set it down for her to shoot next at the range.
    That's when the handgun started firing on its own,
    she said, spinning around in circles, landing the Thourots and an Irish tourist in the hospital.
    "Nothing like that has ever happened," said Sherri Thourot on Sunday evening from her room at Lakeland Regional Medical Center.
    "We've been around guns all our lives."
    It was about 10:30 a.m. Saturday when Sherri Thourot, 46, watched her husband, 47, set the gun down. The couple had decided to try out their new gun at the Saddle Creek Shooting Range in Lakeland.
    They like the Polk County-owned range. It's strict and safe, the way the Thourots say they like to use their guns.
    But as soon as Michael Thourot took his hand off the gun, it started firing like it was possessed, his wife said.
    "I saw that he'd been hit, but I couldn't tell how bad," Sherri Thourot said. "Then I realized I had been hit. My hand was bent forward and I couldn't move my arm."
    A bullet tore through the back of her right arm and exited from her biceps. Her husband had been shot in the left hand. Another man, a 29-year-old tourist visiting a friend, was hit in the shoulder and throat as he stood behind a shooting stall next to the Thourots.
    All three were taken to the Lakeland hospital, where Michael Thourot and the tourist, Gary Flynn, underwent surgery.
    Flynn was listed in stable condition at the hospital, while Michael Thourot was released Sunday. His wife said doctors put pins in his hand to help heal shattered bone.
    She expected to leave the hospital today.
    The Polk County Sheriff's Office said the gun may have been altered, leading to the malfunction. Detectives expect to know more when they take the gun apart and inspect it as they continue to investigate.
    Sherri Thourot said her son, 29-year-old Jeremy, brought the 9mm back to the United States after one of his tours in Iraq with the Navy. He gave it to them this summer.
    The couple cleaned the gun and made sure it was in good condition before taking it to the range, she said. They never expected to leave in an ambulance.
    Before he left the hospital, her husband stopped in to see her.
    "He's very shaken up over it," she said. "He's traumatized that anything like this happened to his wife."
    But the freak accident won't keep her away from guns.
    "I can't allow something like this to cause me to be afraid of something I've done all my life."
     
  20. boogers

    boogers Member

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    Ok, I can't help but think that 80% of the people that post bad comments about these jennings are only saying what they have heard. I'm not here to argue that jennings are great, high quality guns, but I don't think that every single one of them are going to explode and kill everybody around them.

    @a5werkes
    If I could call you out the story you posted plainly states...
    "The Polk County Sheriff's Office said the gun may have been altered, leading to the malfunction"

    If that is even a consideration you can't blame it on the manufacturer. I would be interested to know what was discovered once it was inspected.

    Not trying to tell anybody what to do, just sharing my feelings about the bryco/jennings nine I own and shoot regularly. The only problem I have ever had with this gun is the occassional jam, which only happens with one of the two mags that came with it. I don't recommend anybody go out and purchase one, but if you've got one and you've shot it without incident don't smash it with a hammer and throw it in the lake. People love to share 2nd hand horror stories but I would bet that these types of stories could be found with most manufacturers if you dug deep enough.

    Again, I'm not trying to stir it up, just wanted to share my thoughts.

    btw...I've had more problems with my Hi-Point 9mm (misfeeding/jamming) than I've had with the jennings.
     
  21. a5werkes

    a5werkes Member

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    "Ok, I can't help but think that 80% of the people that post bad comments about these jennings are only saying what they have heard.

    @a5werkes
    If I could call you out the story you posted plainly states..."

    Boogers, please take a deep breath...and keep me out of it. I don't have a dog in this fight.

    I didn't hear anything....I read the published account of the accident in a newspaper......it's a Jennings malfunction thread......they are the words of Chandra Broadwater, a writer for the Times. Rather than take sentences out of context with piecemeal editing, I posted the article in its entirety for those that might have an interest in it.

    "People love to share 2nd hand horror stories".....

    It is not a second hand story. The reported story is a first hand account of 3 people shot and seriously injured by a free standing rotating pistol at a public pistol range....that's the horror, not the brand name.

    When you dig deep enough and locate a public record of another first hand account of a different brand pistol involved in a similar shooting spree please post the story in its entirety.

    There are other threads on which you can share your first hand account of your Hi-Power problems.
     
  22. hatchetbearer

    hatchetbearer Member

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    I had a Jennings .22 for about an hour. bought it off one guy i worked with and fired a magazine, then another co worker came by and offered twice what i just paid for it. he loaded some cci mini mags into it and on the 6th shot the slide sheared off the frame and hit him in the chest. didnt hurt him any, but it sure as hell scared him
     
  23. Madcap_Magician

    Madcap_Magician Member

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    For a moment I thought that the feeding issue at hand was that the Jennings was actually feeding some of the rounds! :D
     
  24. a5werkes

    a5werkes Member

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    Would that be a bulimic Jennings ?
     
  25. boogers

    boogers Member

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    @a5werkes

    I owe you an apology. I did not mean to direct my entire post at you. I just wanted to point out that one line in the story you posted. Your post seems like it was meant to add to the long list of horror stories posted all over the internet. If the gun was altered then I still say that can not be blamed the gun. Again, this was just a suspicion of the authorities at that time. I really would be interested in knowing if the gun actually was altered in any way, and if that alteration may have caused the mishap.

    I was not referring to your story when I said "Second hand horror stories." I was talking about the dozens in different forums that obviously have no personal experience with this weapon, but want to share what they've heard.

    It's the same thing with all the posts sharing their creative ways to destroy a Jennings. It is very frustrating to see these types of post when people ask a serious question and want real answers. And again, I would bet that a lot (not all) of the people that post those types of responses do not have personal experience.

    I sincerely apologize if you felt that I was personally attacking you.

    boogers
     
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