Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Feeling sick after range time?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by nolefan, Jan 14, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. nolefan

    nolefan Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2006
    Messages:
    25
    Location:
    NoVA
    Does anyone else (especially new shooters) feel kinda crappy when they come back from the range? Like, headache, fatigued, just general malaise?

    Am I doing something wrong? I've got great ear protection, but is the sound too much for me? Or am I just concentrating too hard? :)

    Thanks in advance!!!
     
  2. silverlance

    silverlance Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    2,142
    Location:
    In my Foxhole
    probalby

    squinting too much. or chekc your eyes.
     
  3. pax

    pax Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    9,762
    Location:
    Washington state
    New shooters often get a significant adrenalin dump just from firing a pistol.

    The aftermath of an adrenalin dump usually includes fatigue, shakiness, feeling "blah" and a little depressed.

    Keep shooting long enough, and that adrenalin dump will stop happening. Then a trip to the range will cause a zen-like feeling of peace and happiness instead, as you concentrate on your front sight instead of all your other worries. Once that happens, you'll have to work to get a good adrenalin reaction if you want to practice shooting under stress.

    Oh, the headache? Could be adrenalin, but is equally likely to be the result of prolonged tension in your arms/shoulders. Try consciously relaxing those muscles when you come off the range. Also try swinging your arms around between strings of fire, to improve your circulation and release the muscle tension.

    pax
     
  4. f4t9r

    f4t9r Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    Messages:
    2,670
    once again Pax is on it , Great post
     
  5. slopemeno

    slopemeno Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2005
    Messages:
    285
    Indoor range by any chance?
     
  6. springmom

    springmom Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2005
    Messages:
    3,599
    Location:
    Spring TX
    There are a number of reasons for this. Your mileage may vary, but here's what I've experienced:

    1) Are you holding your breath all the time when you shoot? This sounds silly, but if you don't breathe, you're not going to feel real well after a couple of hours of holding your breath too much.

    2) Are you surrounded by clouds of gunsmoke? If a range is real crowded, you do breathe in a lot of crud.

    3) are you shooting on an indoor range? Makes #2 much, much worse!

    4) You might find wearing BOTH plugs and muffs helpful. That's a lot of decibels going on.

    5) It is possible that you are allergic to some of the crud in the air at a firing range, but I wouldn't worry about that unless you have definitively dealt with #1-4.

    6) are you prone to migraines? all of the above will be worse if you are.

    I sympathize. You can experiment with times of day and times of week to go shooting, to see if a quieter range environment and fewer shooters makes for a less sicky feeling when you come home.

    Also: DO NOT EAT OR DRINK AT THE SHOOTING TABLE. I am BAD about this, because I'm something of a Diet Coke-aholic (made much fun of by my hubster about this!) and I like to have a fountain diet coke with me. That at least means that the soda is covered except the straw, but still...this is not good. Step away, go wash your hands, and THEN have a snack and a drink. This is REALLY IMPORTANT.

    Hope all that helps! Mucho sympathy. I know what it's like. :(

    Springmom
     
  7. DMK

    DMK Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    8,763
    Location:
    Over the hills and far, far away
    I often feel slightly fatigued if I spend a couple hours at the range. Not sick or anything, but I often feel like relaxing or taking a nap afterwards. If it's one of my workout days and I workout after going to the range, I definately don't do as well.

    I've often wondered if it had something to do with the concussions of the blasts. I do always wear good ear protection, but I also do kinda feel same way when I'm exposed to any loud noises for a period of time.

    I noticed, I'm also usually very hungery when I get home. I can't think of a single time when I came back from the range and didn't eat something.
     
  8. rchernandez

    rchernandez Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2005
    Messages:
    306
    Location:
    Memphis, TN
    Vigorous scrubbing of hands and forearm with cold water and soap. If you spent a lot of time at the range, shower before sleeping. Hair captures a lot of the particles floating inside the range, these are deposited on your pillow when you sleep and end up inhaling it when you turn around.

    Search THR for "Lead"...lots of good discussions.
     
  9. jeremywills

    jeremywills Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2005
    Messages:
    245
    Location:
    Live Oak Texas
    very good tips as usual folks

    For me it depends on the amount of idiots out there sometimes, lately it seems im more worried about whos around me more than anything, i have just seen too much BS lately that I actually dont sometimes enjoy heading out to the range. I come home in a foul mood when I have had people being very unsafe and I have done the 20 what if questions thing could have happened etc.... ok now back when I was cutting my teeth I too initally would feel like uber crap sometimes after a lengthy range session, depending on the time of the day and year, all of the shots being fired off, your own nervousness, fatigue, especially breaking in a new weapon and learning to control that lovely flinch, the excitement, the wind down period afterwards, many factors already mentioned above, no your not alone my friend. I found taking a nap beforehand helps alot. I dont try to hit the range after a long day of work or any other type of physical activity. OTOH if your a CCW person life doesn't always present ideal conditions and you might have just gotten off work etc... if it all went south, so every now and then I try to go to the range very tired and or already stressed out with other stuff, it does make a difference for me at least. As always, each to his own as your YMMV. Its always good to practice in all conditions when you can. As safely as possible of course, if Im too tired or wiped out then I dont want to be a danger to myself and or others.

    Over time you will probably grow accustomed to it. Then you just kind of as the gentleman said above treat it like a treat. It can be very relaxing. Especially as you gain more confidence. If your not shooting well that can also trigger emotions. When everything went well, you leave alot happier :)

    Good luck sir, keep practicing and always always be safe. Remember that as being the most important thing of all, safety first. I can't harp on that enough.
    J
     
  10. dakotasin

    dakotasin Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    4,777
    Location:
    Transient
    one of the most important things about shooting, and to be a good shot, is to know when to quit!

    i know most on here have to pay to shoot, and going to the range is a big production, so you want to stay as long as possible. try going to the range, and stop shooting after 30 minutes or so. if you feel like you wasted a lot of time driving or whatever for just 30 minutes of shooting, go browse the gun racks, or talk to a gunsmith for awhile.

    over time, build up your range time to all day affairs. but, in the interim, stop when your body tells you to - not when you feel like you got your money's worth. in the long run, it will make it much more enjoyable.
     
  11. Firehand

    Firehand Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Messages:
    738
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    One more factor; how hard are you focusing? If I'm just out for fun, not worrying about perfection, end the time not bad at all.

    When I'm testing loads, or sighting in, REALLY focused on it, I'm a lot more worn down at the end at times.
     
  12. Black Majik

    Black Majik Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Messages:
    5,031
    Location:
    Orange County, California
    I know after a range session I usually feel pretty tired. I usually tell the people I take to the range to expect feeling tired; partly cuz we're gonna be there for a while, and from all the concentrating you're gonna do. It takes a lot outta you.

    As for feeling sick, I'm not sure why that happens to you. I'm guessing its all the junk you breathe in at an indoor range. That definitely doesn't sound rite. Maybe take shorter range sessions and see if that helps? Or go outsidee and take a quick breather/break before heading back in and continuing your shooting...
     
  13. Mighty Hd

    Mighty Hd Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2006
    Messages:
    10
    for me, I feel extremely tired after I go to the range. Some days are worse than others. Usually after about 4-500rds I'm ready to leave and go home.
     
  14. cracked butt

    cracked butt Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    6,986
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    I usually feel pretty darn good after a shooting session.
     
  15. taliv

    taliv Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2004
    Messages:
    22,063
    +1



    however, about eating and drinking... it's important that you drink a lot (preferably water). just don't leave your drink in the cloud of gunsmoke.
     
  16. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    47,608
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    Springmom,

    Since you know drinking or eating anywhere near the range is tatamount to self poisoning are you still doing it or are you telling us that you wait until you've cleaned up and gotten a Coke from a clean source?
     
  17. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    47,608
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    Squinting (tension response or inadequate glasses or lighting can cause this)

    Gripping too hard (this goes away with practice as you become more familiar with shooting)

    Inadequate hearing protection (always double up while shooting)

    Shoulder tension (back to tension response or lack of experience)

    Inhalation of gunsmoke (usually only a problem on an indoor range with poor ventilation)
     
  18. MedGrl

    MedGrl Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2005
    Messages:
    237
    Location:
    Northeastern PA
    if you are using foam earplugs under your muffs you could be puting presure on your inner ear creating the nausia and headach. Try squeezing the foam plugs untill they are the smallest you can get them. and don't put them in too far. as they expand they will push the air out rather than in and reduce the inner ear presure.
     
  19. nolefan

    nolefan Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2006
    Messages:
    25
    Location:
    NoVA
    Great advice, as always! I feel better than I'm not alone in this.

    It IS an indoor range, and sometimes it worries me that this could partly be the cause. I might try the NRA range in Fairfax (which supposedly has great air circulation) and see if I feel any different. I am concentrating alot and trying to be perfect, so maybe that's part of the problem, too.

    You know, I'm always really starving when I leave the range as well. I just can't wait to go home and have something really fattening!!

    This is all been most helpful and I can't thank you guys enough. :)
     
  20. STAGE 2

    STAGE 2 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2003
    Messages:
    899
    Ditto on the air circulation being a huge factor in indoor ranges. I have never had problems with headaches or nausea, however I notice a world of difference when I exit out the double doors and back into the gunshop area of the range. As a result I limit myself to no more than 45 mins max. This is the case even though I almost exclusively shoot during the down times, with only myself an maybe 1 at the most 2 others. I can only imagine what it would be like when its busy.
     
  21. palerider1

    palerider1 member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2005
    Messages:
    341
    Location:
    upstate ny
    Pax hit the nail on the head....i'm in the local volunteer fire department. in training they teach us about adrenalines effects. i know when we have a house fire that adrenaline makes you feel super human almost, but after everything is over when you get home your dead dog tired.
     
  22. RyanM

    RyanM Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Messages:
    4,412
    Location:
    PA
    It may also be the noise, especially if you're indoors. Certain frequencies (or just plain really loud sounds) can cause slight nausea, fatigue, etc. And it's not just your ears, but your entire body. I've noticed that if I'm standing next to someone shooting a high-pressure handgun cartridge, like a 9 mm or .40 S&W, I can actually feel my shirt moving around a little from the blast. That's pretty darn loud.
     
  23. WarMachine

    WarMachine Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Messages:
    506
    Location:
    Earth
    Yes, the adrenaline after affects is one cause; as well as full-system fatigue.

    When you first start shooting, all your senses and muscles are attuned to the task at hand: handling the small explosions happening in your hand. You whole body will be tense even if you don't exactly realize it.

    I used to get some of the same effects when I first started driving as an early teen. It's a totally unnatural act that will only become natural with repetition.
     
  24. newfalguy101

    newfalguy101 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2005
    Messages:
    1,400
    Location:
    Clay Center, Nebraska
    I experienced much of what you are talking about last night after shooting a match. I was simply wiped out by the time I got home, and today I am just a tad sore, which surprised me. I chalked it up to the adrenaline rush followed by the inevitable crash that follows.

    normally, I spend as much time yakking as shooting when at the range so I dont usually get too stressed-out :D
     
  25. McCall911

    McCall911 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,617
    Location:
    Alabama
    "Well...you know, I was feeling sick before I came to the range."
    This is the excuse I use after my poor performance at the range.

    ;) :D
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page