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Fencing vs "real world"

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by kBob, Oct 5, 2013.

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  1. Sheepdog1968

    Sheepdog1968 Member

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    Any sword art taken in high school has to better than taking something such as interpretive dance. If he likes it, he can continue with it or do other weapon arts such as Arnis, samurai swords, staff, etc. it can't do any harm. The more weapons he can practice with the better. Being able to do it in a high school class is just a bonus.
     
  2. .338-06

    .338-06 Member

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    I have been involved in fencing for most of my adult life. If anyone is looking to get into fencing, go look up usfa.org. They have a club finder page on their web site.

    What does fencing give you in self-defense training? Personal combat. There isn't any holding back in fencing. People come as hard and fast at you as they can, no pulling 'punches'. Sometimes blades break and people get injured, though I believe it's safer than football. Your threat distance is greater than in other martial sports or arts. And you learn to think while somebody is trying to hit you with a piece of steel. :eek:
     
  3. Alberforth

    Alberforth Member

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    I fenced for many years when I was younger. As many have said, the more abstract aspects of fencing are well worth learning from a practical standpoint. Even Bruce Lee, who was a more serious thinker about martial arts than some may realize, looked into fencing for the things he could take from it.

    Although this will be obvious to many, it's worth pointing out that if you want to fully apply the things you learn in fencing to real life encounters, at some point you have to learn the technique of the actual tools you'll have. Awareness of tactics, timing, expectation, feints, etc. is invaluable, but being able to transfer them to another context and get the most out of them requires work and practice.
     
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