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Finally bought a revolver and I hate it

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by p89cajun, Aug 30, 2007.

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  1. p89cajun

    p89cajun Member

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    I finally bought a revolver, a taurus cia 650ss, and kinda hate it. I like compact guns and I own three. A millenium pro in .40, a para warthog, and the revolver. The revolver is basically the same size as the para and a little less than 1 inch shorter than the taurus. It weighs the same as the Para and 5 oz. more than the taurus. Basically size and weight wise it has no real advantage over the two.

    The revolver is definately the looser in acuracy. We all shoot each others guns and nobody can shoot the revolver like they can the others. The revolver is also the looser in capacity with the para and mill. pro both more than doubeling the revolvers capacity.

    The only good thing I can say about revolvers is A) They are gorgeous and B) The .357 throws one hell of a fire ball. I don't think I will ever get rid of it because I like having one revolver but he is sure to get lonely because I wont buy another revolver to keep him company.
     
  2. earplug

    earplug Member

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    You have to be nice with revolvers, their female.
     
  3. Gunbabe

    Gunbabe Member

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    EARPLUG....THAT'S SO WRONG!!!! Haha

    Sorry you didn't have a better experince p89cajun. I have a taurus .22 and I love it. I bought a laser grip just for fun. I have a Millenium Pro and a .38 as well.
     
  4. MrBorland

    MrBorland Moderator

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    Is it the revolver or the shooter(s)? Not to be a wise guy, but if this is your 1st revolver, it may take some practice getting used to the trigger, though you didn't say if you were shooting in DA or SA. To test whether the gun's inherently inaccurate or not, shoot it from a rest in SA mode and compare it's accuracy to that of your other guns shot similarly. You might find you just need to practice. Could also be you got a dog.
     
  5. MrTuffPaws

    MrTuffPaws Member

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    Yeah, as accuracy goes, chances are it is your fault and not the guns. Sorry that you don't like it though. IMO, you should have started with a full sized revolver rather than the pocket guns.
     
  6. nitesite

    nitesite Member

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    The snub-nosed revolver is the single most difficult revolver to become proficient with. That's a fact.

    It is widely regarded as an "expert's gun" because of the amount of training or practice required to be accuratte with one.

    I'd just about guarantee you my next paycheck that if I put a 4" K-frame or L-frame in your hand you would shoot far better than with a 2" J-frame sized revolver.
     
  7. col_tapiocca

    col_tapiocca Member

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    Don't get me wrong, but I'll never buy Taurus.
    Most Taurus revolver are cheap copy of Smith & Wesson.
     
  8. p89cajun

    p89cajun Member

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    I understand the accuracy thing. I knew this going in to it. My point was that everyone talks about what good carry guns they are. I just dont see how with such little capacity and such "hard to learn" accuracy.
     
  9. esq_stu

    esq_stu Member

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    Practice a lot with your carry gun.

    IMHO, carry revolvers require way more practice than semi-autos. I've been able to get decent accuracy with DA snubbies at self defense distances, but with much greater difficulty than with autos. I carry a 642,a PM9, and a G26 at different times, and I have to practice A LOT more with the 642 to feel anywhere near confident compared to the others.

    You trade practice for carry comfort and simplicity. Everything's a trade off.
     
  10. Gunbabe

    Gunbabe Member

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    I don't agree........

    With you col_tapiocca. My husband and I have six Taurus guns between us and we have never had any problems with them. I must admit I'd love to have a Smith & Wesson but thats just for the name I suppose.
     
  11. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    Oh, a negative revolver thread?

    Shame on you.... you should have gotten a Colt or Smith revolver!

    There has only been one revolver that I have had trouble shooting as well as I expected. That was a Python a long time ago and I suspect the problem was ME, not the gun.

    Either you like revolvers or you don't. I like them. I hate loading those finger pinching magazines. :)
     
  12. Regolith

    Regolith Member

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    Revolvers are a little bit like a pump shotgun. They're simple, rugged, and extremely reliable. You are basically trading a large magazine capacity for more reliability and simpler manual of arms.
     
  13. jad0110

    jad0110 Member

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    Mechanically, the snubbie is capable of pretty astounding accuracy. So unless there is something wrong with the gun, then it is the software in this case (no offense intended). I have plenty of software problems to address myself, most of us do :eek:. And granted, you have picked one of the more difficult wheelguns to start with, for most people anyway. A 4" S&W Model 10, or a DA 22 of some kind would be more ideal to learn on.

    Don't give up on shooting a DA wheelgun though, even if you don't care for it now. For many, it is an aquired taste. One thing I (among others) note is that many semi-auto only shooters (not all, but many) have a tough time shooting a revolver, whereas a typical revolver shooter that is at least a decent shooter can do well with an auto too, usually.

    I guess what I'm saying is that if you can build good trigger control on a revolver, it should translate to better shooting on your other guns.

    As for capacity, my rule of thumb is that if I determine that there is a realistic chance in my locale of needing more than the 5 shots available to me in my 642, then it's time to move. For me, I desire a reliable gun that draws quickly and points naturally. My S&W 642 fits the bill perfectly ... though YMMV of course.

    Give it time and be patient. When you practice, focus and make each shot count. You will get better with time.
     
  14. GunTech

    GunTech Member

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    I've worked on a lot of revolvers, and while Taurus has come way up in quality, and is, IMO a 'good' gun, it's not a 'great' gun. Lots of rough edges and poor tolerances in the internals. A good revolver is a lot harder to do than a good auto.
     
  15. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    Hell, today most SMITH & WESSON revolvers are a cheap copy of a Smith & Wesson!
     
  16. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Member

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    Don't get me wrong, but I'll never buy Taurus.
    Most Taurus revolver are cheap copy of Smith & Wesson.


    My experience when I worked for BE Hodgdon Inc was that the early Taurus guns when first imported, were of pretty low quality. This was in the late '70's. From what I've heard lately they made a major investment in metalurgy and manufacturing technology the last several years and the quality has improved greatly. Don't own one personally, but they appear to be well made now.
     
  17. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Member

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    Hell, today most SMITH & WESSON revolvers are a cheap copy of a Smith & Wesson!

    Touche':D
     
  18. 44and45

    44and45 Member In Memoriam

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    Boy, have you hit the nail on the head on that one, Smith & Wessons are a cheap copy of what S&W use to be.

    This generation is being over priced on sub quality firearms.

    Here's some real S&W revolvers, made by crafstmen and women, not computer generated crap that is laser etched...all pre-war.

    [​IMG]

    Jim
     
  19. Feanaro

    Feanaro Member

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    I don't think it is that simple. If you make the most mechanically accurate pistol in the world but fit it with gorilla grips and a 50 pound trigger, you can't put all the blame on the shooter. The snub is hard to shoot. Indeed, I would call it the hardest handgun to shoot. This is failure of the hardware.

    However, it can be shot accurately. Not being able to compensate for the weakness of the snubby exposes a weakness in your abilities. The snub fails to make accuracy easy to attain, the shooter fails in not being able to adjust to this weakness.
     
  20. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

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    If it can consistently hit a dessert plate at 8 feet, a gun like this is as accurate as it ever needs to be

    [​IMG]
     
  21. Tom Servo

    Tom Servo Member

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    I can make it do the same at 8 yards most days :)

    The gun itself is capable of far better in the right hands.

    Revolvers take more time to learn. They require discipline and concentration, and they operate on the principle that every round counts.

    Practice with it. When you're decent, pick up an auto, and you'll notice a drastic improvement in your shooting.
     
  22. Silvanus

    Silvanus Member

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    I find reolvers a lot easier to shoot than semi-autos. DA or SA, it doesn't matter, they are always more accurate than a semi. You should try a 4" or longer model.

    44and45, what makes the older Smiths superior?

    I quite enjoy shooting a 686 and my 19. They are both extremely accurate and reliable. They look nice too, but that depends on your taste in firearms.

    What can the "oldies" do that the new ones can't?
     
  23. BigBlock

    BigBlock member

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    Isn't it funny how most people that say things like this don't actually own one? :rolleyes:
     
  24. GunTech

    GunTech Member

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    44and45

    I recently had a chance to compare some recently made S&W with older models from the 50s, 60s and 70s. What I found surprised me.

    The currently made S&W revolvers have better internal fitting and machining than those post war. There were alomost no machining marks in the contemporary revolvers, unlike 1960s and 1970s vintage guns.

    The other thing to remember is that revolvers 'wear in', that is get somther with use. Comparing a revolver with 40 years wear to those made today in not a fair comparison, unless you have one with little or now wear.

    While i like the old S&W and collect 5-screws, the modern CNC made guns are better machined than the old timers. The old guns required much hand fitting. The new ones require none.

    Time matches on.
     
  25. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    I have owned several Taurus revolvers and they were/are satisfactory in all important respects.

    I don't know if you are shooting .357 Magnums through it or not, but If so I understand the cause of your accuracy problems.

    The combination of a double-action only (DAO) trigger pull, small handle and short barrel length and sight radius do make this particular revolver difficult to shoot accurately. Their primary advantage is that they aren't ammunition dependent to work. You can also, if necessary, shoot the revolver through a pocket without first drawing it. Simply dry firing about 1000 times can smooth the trigger pull out. Do fill the chambers with snap-caps or empty cases. The former are a lot better choice. Last but not least, try some mid-range 148 grain .38 Special wadcutters and see if your hand-held accuracy doesn’t improve....
     
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