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Firearm handling etiquette question

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by brekneb, Apr 16, 2008.

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  1. brekneb

    brekneb Member

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    Can't find a post mirroring my question . . . So figured it'd be safe to ask it.

    Suppose I was at someone's house and they offered to allow me to view a select few of their collection.... Being the safe minded individual I am, naturally I would wish to manipulate the action(s) of said firearms and determine they were clear and safe.... This would also include probing into the breech in addition to the mag well... But in doing so, I am of course, leaving behind finger acid deposits.

    This seems rude to me.

    So, any solution to that? Or is this a non-issue? I'm likely might just being paranoid with all this.... But, this is an issue that I at least think of and it goes along the lines of; do unto others, you know?

    Is there even such a thing as ''etiquette'' when it comes to handling another man or woman's firearm? :)
     
  2. nplant

    nplant Member

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    I'm not aware of any codified set of rules, but here's my take: if someone invites you to look over their guns, ask first if they mind you handling them. If they say "no, I don't mind" then you're good to inspect the guns - reasonably including what you're saying you'll do to check them. If they say "yes, I mind" then you're not going to get hands on anyway, so no worries.

    That said, I'd be careful of putting your finger into every breech that you run across. In all seriousness, most of the time you can see that there is no loaded round, and you wouldn't need to stick a finger in there. For closed systems where you're not as sure, okay, fine, but consider just looking.

    If you don't trust your eyes, well, you've got a whole different set of logical problems to deal with.
     
  3. eng23ine

    eng23ine Member

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    Generally speaking, when *I* hand someone a firearm, the action will already be locked open and the magazine removed.

    This way we can both rest assured that the weapon is clear.

    To answer your question: If I didn't want you to fondle something, I wouldn't have handed it to you.
     
  4. Howard Roark

    Howard Roark Member

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    I keep a oiled rag by the safe for this very purpose. Wipe it off and stick it back in the safe. I also would never hand anyone a firearm without checking it in front of them and handing it to them open.

    Ask before dry firing.
     
  5. EHCRain10

    EHCRain10 Member

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    Have to agree that the owner should have opened the action and removed the magazine prior to handing the firearm to you.
     
  6. 2nd 41

    2nd 41 Member

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    I stopped handling others possessions. Cameras, Guns, Collectables and so on. That's just me.
     
  7. csmkersh

    csmkersh Member

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    those that know me know it doesn't matter to me if they've just cleared the piece; if they hand it to me, I'll clear it again.
     
  8. slustan83

    slustan83 Member

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    I'd call that improper etiquette. I always lock back slide and remove mag or open cylinder on revolvers and ask the person if they agree it's clear. Kind of a habit i picked up in the corrections academy.
     
  9. brekneb

    brekneb Member

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    ....I've been reading from the viewpoints of Ayoob and it makes sense to me to check, double check and check some more then check again.
    As it takes only one time to get it seriously wrong.

    Aside from that, I also agree with the concept that this seemingly weird nonsense of feeling for the empty breech and empty mag well (even when you clearly can see there's nothing there) is simply a matter of programming yourself to do it this way every time any time. So those are my motives.
     
  10. brekneb

    brekneb Member

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    So, the owner with an oily rag near the safe thing is a solution, is there any others?
     
  11. Claymore1500

    Claymore1500 Member

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    Anyone that hands me a firearm for any reason, had better accept the fact that I WILL open it and check it, Even if they checked it just before handing it over, If they can't accept that TOO BAD.
    Not that I don't trust them, I just trust me more.
     
  12. glockman19

    glockman19 Member

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    Well, First thing I do when being given any firearm in any circumstance is check to see if it's loaded. After confirming it's empty I fondle.
     
  13. Bezoar

    Bezoar member

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    here is when you should play musuem curator. yeah those acid free gloves like the butler uses to wipe table tops to make sure the maids are doing their jobs. And what they use to fondle those 1000 year old textiles in musuems..
    Still a gun is someones baby. be good to it.
     
  14. MilsurpShooter

    MilsurpShooter Member

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    I hand them over with action locked and mag dropped if the circumstance allows. Rather then reach my hand into someone elses gun I usually take out my Surefire Defender and shine it in there. Can visually tell if there's a round, if I can't with the brightness on that thing, well, then I need a complete new set of eyes lol.

    Silicon cloth in my safe however, it's got hoppes, Rem-oil and all other kinds of stuff on it as well from general use so I give everything a wipe down with that.
     
  15. TAB

    TAB Member

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    before you were given them firearm it should have been checked and the action locked open. If it was not, that is the 1st thing I would do. There is no need to do a "press check" being able to see light down the barrel and into the mag is fine.
     
  16. Sport45

    Sport45 Member

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    I'll check that it's unloaded as well. If I can see the chamber, that's good enough for me and I don't stick my fingers in actions or mag wells. Why would you ever need to stick your finger in a mag well anyway? You can see all the way through the thing.

    What is the proper way to check an old front stuffer?
     
  17. orionengnr

    orionengnr Member

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    If I hand someone a firearm and he doesn't check it (regardless of how many times I check it before handing it to him) then I will not hand him another.

    Safety is paramount, and proper firearms handling promotes safety. If you object to fingerprints, or don't have a rag, then don't hand the weapon over.

    Fingerprints wipe off easily. Holes in your wall/ceiling/child/etc....ummm, not so much.
     
  18. billybob

    billybob Member

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    So.... spinning and clicking is out, huh?

    :D
     
  19. Mortech

    Mortech Member

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    +100 Orion , I'll let them fondle it and then later I'll fondle it with a rag .
     
  20. moooose102

    moooose102 Member

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    i would say this, 1) if they are showing you their private gun collection, it is safe to think of your relationship as freinds. 2) if they hand you a weapon, it is your DUTY to check the action, even if they just did. 3) if they want you to hadle their guns, they are well aware that finger prints and acids will be left behind. unless you have some kind of elevated acid skin condition (seems to me i read something about red haired people having a higher than normal acid level in their skin secretions), do not worry about it. 4) if you DO have a higher than normal acid level, it is also your duty to explain this PRIOR to handling the weapon. 5) the next time that person is at your place, return the favor.
     
  21. mekender

    mekender Member

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    i dont understand the idea of finger banging the gun... if you cant look in and see that there isnt a round in it, perhaps you dont need to be handling guns...
     
  22. buck00

    buck00 Member

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    Silicone cloth.

    If they don't open the action, then you do it. Don't feel awkward about it.

    * I would find that really unusual if someone knew enough about guns to be alarmed over "finger acid" yet not have the common courtesy of opening the action. :uhoh:
     
  23. brekneb

    brekneb Member

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    I kind of thought I was being paranoid on the finger print thing, looks like I was....

    Okay, so, don't worry about it I guess is what you're all saying?

    And on the status-check. Yes, even if someone, right in front of me, hands over a firearm and I clearly see that they have cleared the mag and locked the chamber open I will still continue to visually and tactilely confirm.

    The source where I am getting this reasoning is reading material from Ayoob .... Ayoob's theorizing on the tactile confirmation is basically that; this is the only way you'll be able verify there is indeed a live round in the breech, at night, under stress, (say if someone is breaking into your home and you needed to grab a defensive arm for protection). And, so therefore if you feel for the mag and breech even under routine handling conditions, you should hopefully, instinctually do this in a stress situation.

    Plus, it's just one more redundant safety step right? Can't be too safe.

    Thanks much from a noob.
     
  24. 32winspl

    32winspl Member

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    I appreciate the owner checking it for safe. I too will do it. With an auto, if I can see that there's nothing in the chamber, and nothing in the "handle", I'm not going to play "third base" with it.
    With a revolver, cylinder open and empty, I'm not gonna stick my smallest digit up the pipe.
    I'm gonna think that you've invited me into the Holy of Holies, that you think that I'm WORTHY, and will be appropriately reverent.
     
  25. mekender

    mekender Member

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    at night under stress, any gun i grab is going to be loaded and ready to go... the only exception would be my 12ga which will be loaded with the action open so that all i have to do is close the action and be ready to go... again i dont see the need to treat my guns like suzy rottencrotch behind the gym...
     
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