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First Range visit with Ruger Security Six. Cycling problem?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by gossamer, Jan 17, 2013.

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  1. gossamer

    gossamer Member

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    I had my first range visit with my new-to-me Ruger Security Six. The gun was accurate as I could be with it. Felt great.

    Of the 50 rounds I put through it I was 98% pleased. I had one small problem with it. After the first couple cylinder's full I noted a problem cycling the action on a round. When I pulled the trigger the cylinder wouldn't turn. It was as if a case was hanging up the action.

    I stopped, opened the chamber. Pulled the fired rounds out. Re-inserted the unspent rounds and tried again. First one was fine. Then the cycling problem again.

    I stopped again. Removed all rounds. Re-loaded the cylinder with five new rounds and the one live round from the previous six. Shot a few rounds fine, then had the cycling problem again.

    I got it to cycle and fire all six and the remaining rounds form the box were fine too.

    I've dry-fired with Aluminum snap caps probably 700 times in the last week with no problem.

    At the range I was using Winchester White Box 38 Spl. FMJ and shooting DA only.

    My assumption is this was a problem with one of the rounds in the box. But that's just an ass-u-me-ption

    As I noted in a previous post, this circa 1977 gun is and was pristine. Almost like it had never been fired. But it's also new to me and this was my first trip with it and the first time I've fired more than 20 rounds with a revolver.

    So they are new to me.

    I won't really worry it until I've been able to repeat the condition on multiple occasions with different rounds, different brands, etc..

    But before I go on, does the collective wisdom and experience of the group have any suggestions or things to check on the gun itself?

    Thanks in advance and I have to say I love shooting this gun. I was a lot more accurate with it than I thought I would be in DA. Even got high praise from a retired Navy shooter at that range on my accuracy.

    Thanks again all.
     
  2. MrBorland

    MrBorland Moderator

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    I'm not very familiar with the workings of Rugers, but your assumption sounds likely to me as well. Possibly a high primer or a burr on the case rim. Unless it's a problem that shows up again, I wouldn't sweat it too much. Enjoy your new revolver. Sounds like a nice gun.
     
  3. ATLDave

    ATLDave Member

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    I've gotten that in revolvers with a high/incompletely-seated primer. Also, if there's a lot of carbon in one or more of the chambers, and you're using a longer case than the cases that deposited the carbon (for instance, shooting .357's after someone shot a lot of .38's), that ring might make it difficult for the widest or longest of the cartridges to seat fully.
     
  4. KevininPa

    KevininPa Member

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    What ATLDave said

    I'd give it a thorough cleaning. Rugers are great for this due to their modular design. Get a brush in that cylinder. Then try shooting with another brand of ammo. That was made back in the day before Ruger produced some bad eggs. Seems like more slips through the cracks these days. I have a Speed Six and the wife has a Security, both of the SS 2 3/4 flavor. Great revolvers.
     
  5. Remllez

    Remllez Member

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    gossamer,

    You weren't short stroking the trigger by chance? Sounds like the more rounds you shot maybe your finger tired and you weren't cycling the trigger full thru.

    Just a thought.
     
  6. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

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    I have had similar issues come up from time to time with my Sixes, typically due to a round snagging on something or not fully seating due to shooting 38's and switching to 357's.
     
  7. PO2Hammer

    PO2Hammer Member

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    Check the recoil shield. If there are ridges or rough spots they can snag on high primers or even the brass itself.
     
  8. gossamer

    gossamer Member

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    I thought that the first time, but not after I emptied and reloaded it with the same round twice.

    I'm guessing it was a high primer but I'm going to brush the cylinder with a .40 brush and check the shield too.

    Thanks for the input everyone.
     
  9. 788Ham

    788Ham Member

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    To make sure you get the cylinder cleaned well enough, if 38's being shot after 357 rounds, get a .40 cal bronze brush, insert it into a cordless drill. Dip the brush into some Hoppes, run the drill /brush inside the chamber holes, this will clean the deposits of carbon out. Another guy here on THR told me about it, works like a champ! Good luck.
     
  10. 351 WINCHESTER

    351 WINCHESTER Member

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    Also clean under the extractor. Sometimes unburnt powder/debris gets under it and can cause problems.
     
  11. 35 Whelen

    35 Whelen Member

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    The ejector pin on my Security Six sometimes unscrews itself, binding things up a little. You might check that.

    35W
     
  12. VA27

    VA27 Member

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    351 & 35 have the right idea here. Make sure the ejector rod is tight (put empty cases in the cylinder to prevent stressing the extractor) and use your mother-in-law's toothbrush to scrub between the cylinder and extractor. It only takes a few grains of powder between them to cause binding. Also, turn the muzzle up when ejecting the empties to prevent unburned powder from falling in there.
     
  13. Lucky Derby

    Lucky Derby Member

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    Happened to me with a Colt Trooper. High primer was the culprit.
     
  14. Jeeping

    Jeeping Member

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    My GP had same problem, come to find out that you need to keep the place under the ejector star clean. After cleaning the gun very good and shooting 200 rounds or so mine will start to bind up a little due to all crud building up under the star. Just clean that place very well and you should be good to go.
    Please report back if/when you find a solution. So many people come for help and when they figure the solution just forget about their post. Please get back with us and let every one know what was the culprit.
    Thanks
     
  15. gossamer

    gossamer Member

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    Went through the chamber with a .40 brush and slow cordless drill today. Also re-cleaned the star, ejector rod and face underneath it.

    Everything looks clean now. If I can find .357 ill buy that for my range date next week. Otherwise I'll just shoot the .38 I have and report back.

    Thanks again.
     
  16. skidder

    skidder Member

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    This is excellent advice. Common problems like these should be addressed first.

    I have several Security Six revolvers, and for the most part, they are one of the most reliable out there.

    I recently purchased a Security Six in great condition upon inspection. My first trip to the range revealed a slight problem. The cylinder locked up after 20 rounds in both SA and DA. I performed a thorough examination and found the B/C gap was .000 (cylinder rubbing on forcing cone). I installed a couple endshake bearings and that was the end of the lockup. I've had this happen on several S&W revolvers, but never on a Ruger. My B/C gap, after installation, is .004 and the action is as smooth as a baby's heineken.

    This is not a common problem, but it doesn't hurt to eliminate the unlikely.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
  17. gossamer

    gossamer Member

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    Never mind. i found it - barrel to cylinder gap. we'll see if my motorbike feelers will get me to .004.

    Thanks

    Can you describe what the BC gap is? I'm finding a lot of football info on a google search but nothing that describes where this is and how to measure it.

    Thanks
     
  18. skidder

    skidder Member

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    Sorry about the abbreviations. Standard feeler gauges should work fine.

    Check the gap and make sure it is not too tight (or touching). I prefer mine to be .004 to .006, but Ruger says it's OK up to .008. If you have less than .002 you might want to think about getting endshake bearings/washers installed. (FYI-- The bearings move the cylinder back to increase the gap.)

    Check it with the cylinder pushed all the way forward and then with it all the way back. The difference in the two measurements is what's referred to as "Endshake".
     
  19. gossamer

    gossamer Member

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    My gauges go to .003". And it's too tight for that gauge. So... Looks like I need to have one or a couple bearings put on.

    Is that a job for a smith or can I do it? The take-down to get the cylinder off is pretty straight forward per the manual but I've no idea how much there is to taking apart the cylinder assembly to get the bearings on.
     
  20. skidder

    skidder Member

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    I would buy some gauges that go to .001 or .0015 and check again (found at most auto parts stores). Also, make sure you check the gap on all 6 chambers.

    Mine was so bad you could see the scrape marks on the powder residue.

    Not to hard to do it yourself, but it wouldn't hurt to have a gunsmith take a look at for you. Give them a call and see what it costs? Anything over $50 and I would do it myself.

    I purchased a 10 pack of .002 from Midway. Here is a link.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/519485/power-custom-endshake-bearing-ruger-six-series-gp-redhawk-super-redhawk-002-package-of-10
     
  21. gossamer

    gossamer Member

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    Sounds like a plan. I will get smaller gauges and re-check to see where it's at on all 6.

    Thanks for the advice.
     
  22. ZeSpectre

    ZeSpectre Member

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    A credit card is a passable gauge for this sort of thing.
     
  23. gossamer

    gossamer Member

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    I may just have thick credit cards but mine aren't anywhere near .003" thin. On the other hand, my gauges go down that thin.
     
  24. gossamer

    gossamer Member

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    Just measured each chamber with my feeler gauges. Not one is over .003" I can get a .002" (smallest I could find) to slide in the gap if I sort of forced it. So I'll probably be looking into having bearing(s) put on it or doing it myself.

    Thanks for the advice.

    Incidentally, a credit card measured .0305 with a digital caliper.
     
  25. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    A revolver cylinder expands lengthwise from heat when fired. When the b/c gap gets down around .003" or less, the expanision can cause binding after about 2-3 cylinders full (12-25 rounds). Many people believe that the tighter the gap the better to minimize pressure loss, not realizing that too tight a gap can be as bad in its way as to large a one. IMHO, the ideal gap is .006-.007, though some makers set their range .003-010".

    Jim
     
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