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first SR1911 problem?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by ISO1600, May 21, 2011.

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  1. ISO1600

    ISO1600 Member

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    i searched and found nothing.
    Today i picked up my (wife's) SR1911. Haven't shot it yet. Just got home from dinner, decided to strip and clean/lube it. Got all the factory grime off (either they left a lot on it, and had to have shot it more than once- or the dealer i got it from had some fun and didn't clean up afterwards)..... well after cleaning, i put a drop or two of Rem-Oil on the frame rails, and put her back together.
    All was well and good until after i had racked the slide probably 5 times- it stuck. Like, HARD stuck. Had to whack the rear of the slide real freaking hard to get it to return to battery.
    Concern sets in.
    Strip the pistol back down, nothing looks unusual.
    Clean and oil again.
    Repeat.... still sticking, although very intermittently. Sometimes every "rack" in a row for as many as 10 it will get stuck, then it will be fine for 4 or 5... only to get stuck the next time.
    This isn't, by definition, my FIRST 1911- i got a Metro Arms for myself a few weeks ago that is off getting warranty work right now. I think i have bad luck with these things.

    BUT my question is- is some inconsistent slide/frame friction normal for a new 1911? Does it need to be shot some to wear in?

    I am concerned about it, because we were planning on shooting this in our CHL class tomorrow morning. Here it is midnight and i dont have much trust in this gun to function properly tomorrow. Might have to use the LCP (ugh) or a rental haha.



    any advice?
    I also have a gross machine mark or some kind of imperfection on the left side of the trigger guard, just near the mag release.
     
  2. ISO1600

    ISO1600 Member

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  3. blackhawk556

    blackhawk556 Member

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    Oh man that sucks. That mark looks crappy, I guess that shows these aren't custom finished guns. I still want one though. I read about someone's xd locking like this and people say it ws because they didn't put the recoil spring and barrel back correctly. I hope that helps.

    Sent from my SGH-i917 using Board Express
     
  4. ISO1600

    ISO1600 Member

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    yeah i have read that about recoil springs- i'll take another look at it, but it is still in the factory position. haven't taken it off the plunger.
     
  5. Jed Carter

    Jed Carter Member

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    It is possible to put a 1911 back together with the slide catch/takedown pin not in the barrel link.
     
  6. ISO1600

    ISO1600 Member

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    looking at it again, i found rough, galled marks on both sides of the frame/slide contact areas where it has definately been making some hard contact. Lots of metal powder from the rubbing. I've racked it probably 200 times and it is feeling smoother, but the rail on the left side looks like crap now.
    I'll take it to the range today and run 100-200 rounds through and report back.
     
  7. WC145

    WC145 Member

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    Use more/better lube, maybe some light grease on the rails. In my experience 1911s run better a little on the wet side. I use M-Pro7 and don't have any problems with my guns except a Detonics, it needs a little touch of Tetra grease on the rails.

    As far as the cosmetic issues go, speak to Ruger and see what they say. I'd live with that mark in the picture but that's me.
     
  8. ohwell

    ohwell Member

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    Like Jed said better make sure the slide stop is going through the barrel link
     
  9. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

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    If the problem stems from "the slide stop not going through the barrel link", it would seem that the slide sticking issue would not be occurring intermittently but would be happening every time. I think the problem is either due to improper frame to slide tolerances or poor finishing on the slide rails or a combination of the two. And the slide on a 1911 pistol should not stick even if inadequately lubed.
     
  10. aminyard

    aminyard Member

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    The fix is simple, send it back to remington and let them fix it (for free).
     
  11. ISO1600

    ISO1600 Member

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    i dont think Remington would like me sending in a Ruger. :)
     
  12. ISO1600

    ISO1600 Member

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    After messing with it a LOT last night and this morning, it is travelling much better. Still not as smooth as my American Classic, but we'll see if it gets better. Picked up some Tetra grease at the gun show, and am headed to the range with 250 rounds of various 230gr and 185gr. Will report back later today.
     
  13. jgiehl

    jgiehl Member

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    With my Springfield 1911 I had it was a little sticky at first and was touchy with certain ammo. So I took it out and bought a bunch of ammo and just pounded away. Wasn't doing accuracy but working the gun to smooth it up.
     
  14. xr1200

    xr1200 Member

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    Thats one of the problems with a full stainless steel 1911, if you make it to tight it usually gauls at the frame rails.

    This is why a lot the manufacturers make 1911 slide to frame fit is loose.

    In 1990's top custom 1911 smiths catalogs, they advised that if you wanted your gun as tight as possible, you needed to use a blued gun or if you had a stainless steel gun it needed to be hard chromed in order to minimize gauling.

    One key thing I noticed about ruger stainless steel guns and identical blued models , is that the stainless steel model will be a lot soften or less hardened than the identical blued models.

    If you take a ruger 77 or one of the intergeral scope ring revolver models and securely tighten the scope rings to the reciever or mount and then remove them, you will find that the metal on the stainless steel models is severly distorted by the scope rings at the base of mounts reciever.

    Now do the same thing on the identical blued model, there will only be a small mark in the finish, no visible distortion of the metal.

    From this observation you can easily see that ruger carbon steel models are harder than the stainless steel models.

    One other point about stainless steel is that it usually can't be hardened by the normal heating process, the hardness of stainless steel is usually determined by the metals alloy content.

    If you want the most accurate and tight 1911 then stick to the carbon steel models, stainless steel guns are best for duty or daily carry firearms.

    Here's a good link explaining the nature of stainless steel. http://chemistry.about.com/cs/metalsandalloys/a/aa071201a.htm
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2011
  15. 918v

    918v Member

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    Thank You for saving me alot of money :)
     
  16. ISO1600

    ISO1600 Member

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    Just shot 250 rds. With tetra on the slide. Runs perfect now. No complaints.
     
  17. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    xr1200,
    416 stainless steel is martensitic and is commonly used for 1911 frames and slides, barrels, receivers etc. It can be tempered and hardened. Ed Brown doesn't have a problem with stainless steel 1911s and neither do I. All six of my 1911s have stainless steel frames, and five of them have stainless steel slides too. No galling, binding or other issues to report.

    From Ed Brown's FAQ

    Q: What is the difference between stainless and blue steel [1911s]? Does stainless steel gall?

    A: Stainless steel is more rust resistant, and costs a little more. There is no other significant difference between the two with regard to any attribute of a 1911 - accuracy, longevity, durability, etc. are all virtually identical between the two. We have been building all stainless guns for many years from high quality 416 stainless steel and there are no problems with galling.
     
  18. 918v

    918v Member

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    I owned a stainless Springer 1911... no galling. Regular oil for lube.

    I owned a Sig P226 Sport Stock that was as tight as my P210. no galling either, again using regular good old Break Free gun oil.

    Tight has nothing to do with it. I suspect the slide is as soft as the frame here.
     
  19. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    I agree. A properly machined and fitted 1911 made from quality stainless steel offers better corrosion resistance while giving up nothing in terms of reliability or longevity.
     
  20. ISO1600

    ISO1600 Member

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    Update, since people seem to be concerned (as noticed in another thread).

    nearly 500 rounds in, and this thing is wonderful.
    Here are some close-up pictures of the slide/frame rails showing any wear that you may or may not be concerned about.
    [​IMG]
    IMG_3501 by Chris.jpg, on Flickr
    [​IMG]
    IMG_3497 by Chris.jpg, on Flickr
    [​IMG]
    IMG_3499 by Chris.jpg, on Flickr
    [​IMG]
    IMG_3500 by Chris.jpg, on Flickr

    If anybody would like higher resolution versions, let me know.

    As for my American Classic 1911, it had an out of spec disconnector, and has been returned to me in perfect functioning order.
    [​IMG]
    IMG_3493 by Chris.jpg, on Flickr

    i have since installed slim G10 Hogue grips on the SR1911, and put its grips on the Metro to replace its crummy panels.
     
  21. Apocalypse-Now

    Apocalypse-Now Member

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    quite the opposite, SS is not as hard as high carbon steel. for this reason, SS 1911's generally peen and loosen much quicker than carbon steel ones.

    also, if not treated properly, like s&w SS 1911's and some kimber SS barrels, they rust easier as well.


    SA uses low carbon SS. plus, they treat and finish it well so they don't tend to rust. peening is not unusual for them either, although it's rarely an issue. it's unknown whether ruger does either of these. the frame is already going to be softer steel because it's cast, rather than forged (in addition to being SS).


    if i were interested in getting an SR1911, i would wait for the inevitable carbon steel one :) JMO (i'm picky when it comes to 1911 purchases lol)
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2011
  22. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Those grips look real nice on the Ruger.

    I also like the way Ruger did the rear serrations, and also like that they left them off the front.

    I'm glad it is running nicely for you now. :)
     
  23. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    What high carbon steel is used for 1911 frames and slides ... the specific alloy if you'd care to enlighten us? How do you peen a slide and frame in shear? I'll stick with Ed Brown thank you very much and take a 416 stainless frame and slide over a carbon steel frame and slide every day of the week. As for corrosion, my preference is stainless steel with a coating of some form or another. As for Kimber and stainless steel barrels, which models have stainless steel barrels? Neither my Tactical Entry II or Stainless Pro Raptor II have stainless steel barrels.
     
  24. Apocalypse-Now

    Apocalypse-Now Member

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    you know, you can disagree without sounding obnoxious, right? ;)

    not sure what you're asking, some 1911's are prone to peening and some aren't. the slide/barrel locking lugs are a location where it's particularly prevalent.

    ...and yes, i know not all kimber has SS barrels (did you bother to read my previous post, or just the one sentence you quoted?).

    here's a nice reference site to kimber SS barrels rusting that i previously mentioned, along with peening and some other issues (pics included): http://www.full-auto.org/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=54

    feel free to ask more questions, or disagree without being curt :)
     
  25. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    You stated that stainless steel 1911s are prone to peening because stainless steel isn't as hard as high carbon steel. I've asked you to tell us which carbon steel alloys are used in carbon steel slides, barrels and frames. Ed Brown uses 416 stainless steel for frames, slides and barrels so you must know which carbon steel series is used since you state that it's harder than stainless steel.
     
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