Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

First time hunting for white tale

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by younggun619, Oct 7, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. younggun619

    younggun619 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2010
    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    sunny San Diego
    Going with my best friend and his uncle somewhere down here in southern cali around Cleavland national forest. Taking my dads winchester model 70 in 30-06. My question is what round should i bring for white tale? should i stick with the tried and true 150gr soft point Remington rounds Ive shoot since i was a kid or should i go for a heavier 180grainer?
     
  2. ssfeldjager

    ssfeldjager Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Messages:
    51
    Location:
    Indonesia
    The 150 grain will do fine. And it's white TAIL.
     
  3. Yarddog

    Yarddog Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2010
    Messages:
    503
    Location:
    FL.--There's a Gator in the bushes & She's callin
    Good Luck Great Gun & round Stat Safe & Keep your EYES & EARS open ; )
    Y/D
     
  4. MichaelK

    MichaelK Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Messages:
    416
    The won't be whitetails here in California. Here they're desert mule deer. I got one over near the Hemet side of the national forest. They tend to be on the small side, so your 150 grain soft points are just right.
     
  5. blackops

    blackops Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2009
    Messages:
    1,238
    They aren't true desert mule deer (for majority), thus the size differential. They are blacktail.
     
  6. S&Wfan

    S&Wfan Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,310
    Location:
    Georgia
    Ask your dad what make of ammo and type + weight of bullet shoots best in his 30.06. THAT'S what you need to use. Each specimen of any make/type of rifle "prefers" certain ammunition that it shoots best.

    Also, different bullet weights, makes and types shoot to different "point of aim" locations, so knowing what he preferred would probably yield you better accuracy and thus less chance of wounding and tracking a deer for hours. Shot placement is everything.

    Also, try to sight in the round that you get before the hunt. Scopes can move, aimpoints can mysteriously change sometimes.

    Good luck on your hunt.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page