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FN Hi Power Safe To Shoot?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by ducguy, Oct 3, 2012.

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  1. ducguy

    ducguy Member

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    I recently purchased a "Nazi" FN Hi Power with Waa140 proofmarks. I also on the advise of other forum members purchased a book by Anthony Vanderlinden titled FN Browning Pistols Side-Arms that Shaped World History. Upon reading up on the Hi Power that I now own, Vanderlinden claims that you should not fire any Hi Power that has "Waa140" proofmarks. This due to sabotage by factory workers at the time the gun was made. I have put approximately 200 rounds through mine since buying it. I did have to replace the extractor but I believe this was broke prior to me buying the gun. The gun seems to work fine. Does anyone have any further info? Should I worry about the gun blowing up?
     
  2. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    Any competent gunsmith should be able to examine the gun and possibly test fire it, if you really think it's a concern -- but I think that claim by the author is one of the many MYTHS from WWII. I've never heard that claim made by a reputable source or a recognized expert.

    If there were any guns sabotaged, they would have been found soon after they were put into the field. The 1911Forum has one message chain on this topic, and several members there have Waa140 guns that have MANY rounds through them without problems. (One of the respondents had a broken extractor.) If you've replaced the extractor, I'd guess you're good to go...
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2012
  3. jonnyc

    jonnyc Member

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    It's a shame if that extractor you replaced is a numbered part. I hope you saved it.
    And the Germans had competent QC inspectors at all their arms plants. A slave-laborer might have dreamed of sabotaging something, but probably wouldn't have gotten away with it, until maybe the very end of the war.
     
  4. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    A collector would happily exchange a NIB BHP for it and you'd have a "better" shooter and a piece of history would be preserved.
     
  5. Dentite

    Dentite Member

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    My understanding is that this is more myth than truth. If you've given it a thorough inspection and have run 200rds through it I think you have your answer. That being said I wouldn't consider the gun a workhorse that I would want to put a ton of rounds though just because of it's value as a collectors item (if in decent original shape).

    Pics?
     
  6. gyvel

    gyvel Member

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    It was actually lack of experience by the impressed labor force that started the myths about sabotage. People were sent to work in factories who didn't know what they were doing.

    This often resulted (for example) in parts that were improperly heat treated, resulting in too soft or overly brittle components that broke after very little use.

    Actual bona fide acts of sabotage were rare, as the penalties were swift and severe if one got caught.
     
  7. ducguy

    ducguy Member

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    Thanks everyone for your help.
     
  8. KenW.

    KenW. Member

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    The one I have is a great shooter, it just doesn't like modern mags.

    Grandpa got from a German who no longer had use of it during the Battle of the Bulge.
     
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