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Food

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by xxjumbojimboxx, Jun 17, 2013.

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  1. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Member

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    Im curious about wild hog. I know people smoke beef, and fish, but I was wondering if the same was doable with hog meat. Both for a delicious snack and as a means of preserving it in a wilderness, or survival situation. I know it needs to be heated to at least 140 degrees for more than a minute to kill that worm that starts with a t.. Trechyea? Something like that... Either way.. Has anyone smoke cured wild hog? How well does it hold? Any recipees?

    Lastly I have no knowledge of this, but what would be some good spices found wild here in central texas? Bonus points for anyone who can answer that :)
     
  2. Sav .250

    Sav .250 Member

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    One other source would be to google your question. Information is there.
     
  3. Archaic Weapon

    Archaic Weapon member

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    I think that jalapenos and garlic will grow most anywhere.
     
  4. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Do NOT jerk pork. Pork must be COOKED thoroughly at high temperature due to the possibility of trichinosis, swine brucellosis, and other diseases/parasites they can carry. I preserve hog meat in a freezer. I've read about packing the meat in fat, some such, really have to rely on others here for any other preserving methods. Bound to be a way since folks were eating pigs well before refrigeration, but the only thing I trust with pig meat is the freezer.
     
  5. Beentown

    Beentown Member

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    High temp is a bad idea for taste later. Slow and low will kill the possible pests also and help with flavor retention. Even with preservation meats. I smoke pork in strips at 170 until I get the "pull" I want.

    Just as a side note....we have virtually eliminated trichinosis in our commercial pork supply. Used to be a real problem but no longer. Still can be an issue with wild hogs.
     
  6. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    Folks have been doing the smoked ham thing since before I was born.
     
  7. MtnCreek

    MtnCreek Member

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    You should remove fat. Fat will go rancid.
     
  8. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Member

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    I love how this becomes a standard answer to just about every question posted on this forum. Im 27. The world I grew up in had google. I know how to use it. The simple fact is I value the opinion of ::most:: of the members on this site significantly more then Joe Schmoe on google. Thats why I come here, Thats why I'm a member.
     
  9. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Member

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    Im looking for something I can do out in the field. My plan would be to make a trip of it. Set up camp, and build a bush smoking rack. From what I've researched one can make a very sufficient smoke house/rack, albeit not very efficient or controllable temperture wise, out of basic materials.

    Has anyone tried it though? How does it Taste?
     
  10. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    Tastes like your local BBQ but no sauce or rub. That's all they do is smoke it for about 12-15 hours.

    OH! I forgot, Texans don't eat real BBQ; they use cows instead. ;)
     
  11. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Member

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    Heyyy now! we love our brisket here, and you would too!, but you can still find some fine pork out here as well..

    Anyways, thats not realllly what im talking about... Im talking about smoking it for preserve it... In a medium term storage role. You know like a month or two. Its easily done with beef and venison.. But im still not sure about hog.
     
  12. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    170 degrees IS high enough. 180 or above is recommended most places I've seen it. I generally smoke hams for 8-10 hours. I just cook it till it's done and tender. Pork is easy to cook tender due to all the fat in it, even in wild pigs. That's what I like about it. I've tried venison, too lean.

    I'm no BBQ master, but I do appreciate a tender, mesquite smoked brisket. Guess that's the Texan in me. I won't turn down a chunk of well smoked wild pork, though. :D Heck, I'll even eat it with Kansas City sweet sauce.

    HOWEVER, the question, I believe, is how to PRESERVE the meat without refrigeration? I don't leave left over BBQ out of the refrigerator, myself. I would NOT jerk the meat as I do with venison. Proper jerking is done at very low temp with wood smoke for 24 hours +. Basically, you're drying out the meat more so than cooking it.
     
  13. Beentown

    Beentown Member

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    Yeah when I do vensison sticks/jerky it is a lot lower heat (125-140ish) for about 12-16 hours depending on the "pull" again. I do wild pork that way also but at 170 instead. I didn't type that out real clear.
     
  14. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Member

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    Beentown

    You boston bred? I am, Miss it...
     
  15. Beentown

    Beentown Member

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    Nope, OH farm boy. It is a play on my last name and a nickname from my "Al Bundy" days.
     
  16. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    "OH! I forgot, Texans don't eat real BBQ; they use cows instead."

    Huh? Barbecue is a style of cooking. Cow, goat, hog, cougar, javelina...
     
  17. Officers'Wife

    Officers'Wife Member

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    We smoke our (pork) bacon and hams for about 5 days using a mix of wood species basically hickory. We strive for a constant temp of 110 to 130 degrees. The idea is to infuse the meat with acidic compounds in the smoke that retard bacteria growth. For hams (both pork and venison) I use a strong brine mixed with blackstrap molasses, pulverized sage and a small amount of sodium nitrate. (The last discourages the growth of botulism) As well as a few other herbs and spices I don't care to share on the internet. For hams I use a IV line with the needle clamped into the femoral artery and inject the described mixture directly into the ham then clamp anything that leaks before putting in the smokehouse. My molasses cured venison ham actually converted my staunchly anti-hunter in-laws into frequent dinner guests during hunting season.

    (The rumor that I include dark Jamaican rum in my mixture has been greatly exaggerated. )

    Smoking for preservation will not completely kill the roundworm larvae that cause Trichinosis! Any pork product must be cooked thoroughly to prevent ingestion.
     
  18. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Member

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    polk high number one rushing back!... ::heismann stance::

    Hahahahha love it. Bundy reminds me a LOT of my old man.
     
  19. shiftyer1

    shiftyer1 Member

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    I have never heard of a way to preserve pork quickly in the texas heat. I think smoked hams and bacon is a drawn out process done in colder temps. Hogs are normally killed in the fall because of this. It's also normally cured which is a brining process.

    Tell me a Texan can't bbq a pork butt that will blow you I'll invite ya over and prove you a liar:) Of course I was taught by a friend from Mississippi
     
  20. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Member

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    Man....

    Im in central texas too. Ill eat the pork with a smile!
     
  21. 41 Mag

    41 Mag Member

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    To be honest, if I were looking to have a supply of dried or jerked meat for survival, I would probably not look at the hogs. Just WAY to easy to pick up something that don't want to leave.

    If in a survival type situation, I would probably not be overly concerned with what was in season, as much as what was going to be for dinner. I think I would look more towards venison or fish to cure out, or smaller critters to use on a more regular basis.
     
  22. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    When you take a "ham ham" or a deer ham off the heat of the barbecue pit, remember that heat will still travel to the center. Sure, the exterior begins to cool by radiation, but the residual heat still goes inward.

    If your target temperature for the center is 160, taking it away from the heat at a center temp of around 150 to 155 will work.

    Less drying...
     
  23. Ed Ames

    Ed Ames Member

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    Yep. To quote the CDC:

    I have dry cured quite a few commercial pork shoulders with a salt mixture and long term (multi-day) low temperature (under 120) smoking. I used instructions found with a Google search for diy dry cure bacon, and ingredients (esp. the pink salt) from Asian grocery stores. I then kept it in my cupboard (not refrigerated) and cut off chunks to use to flavor soup, which it did awesomely well. Better than any commercial dry cure bacon I have bought. Intensely flavorful and I won't testify how long it stays safe but I kept some in my cupboard for months and I didn't die. It looked/smelled fine after a year.

    Would I do that with wild pig? No. Wild bear? Apparently *bleep* no. But personally I don't think commercial pork is a big threat and medium-cooked pork tastes wonderful compared to what happens to it at 160.
     
  24. Lloyd Smale

    Lloyd Smale Member

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    I cook my commerical pork to 165. But wild bore i take up to at least 180. Ive made jerky but was told to not do it at low temps. Turn the smoker right up to about 225 right out of the gate. Also make sure anytime your making jerky out of pork to use a cure like quick cure. it goes along way toward killing the bad stuff. I use it even when i make venison jerky.
     
  25. ridgerunner1965

    ridgerunner1965 Member

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    if i was in a survival situation and all i had was a hog and had to smoke it on a rack of green twigs.i would use lean meat and basically cook it and then smoke it till it was hard and dry as a old boot.the cooking would kill the bad stuff and the smokeing would repel any new bad stuff. it wont be tasty but mite get you a few days to the next kill.

    if your talking backyard smokeing then thers plenty of info and 1000 diff methods on the net.

    one thing native americans did was gorge themselves on what they could before it spoiled and dry the rest while doing it.after a few 1000 yrs of doing it, their metabolism adjusted to it.
     
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