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Forgotten revolver tips and tricks.

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Thaddeus Jones, Mar 15, 2013.

  1. murf

    murf Member

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    if you want a lot more very good info on revolver shooting, do a forum search on "mrborland".

    i have never seen any bad info from his posts.

    murf
     
  2. Vica

    Vica Member

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    Thanks for the search tip
     
  3. MartinS

    MartinS Member

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    Thumb forward, out of contact with the gun or thumb down, curled and part of the grip on the weapon. Seems like the former is better for shooting, the latter better for holding on to the gun in a scuffle. Which would be the default? Thumb down in a death grip I think.
     
  4. BSA1

    BSA1 Member

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    This is a great topic. It is bringing back lots of memories.

    Another tip I just remembered is we would place a small piece of rubber tubing over the hammer. This would keep the sharp checkering from wearing against our clothes causing them to fray (especially nice for plain clothes sport jackets) while still giving a non-slip cocking surface.

    We would usually get a piece of tubing from the hospital E.R. while flirting with the nurses.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  5. sgt127

    sgt127 Member

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    photo-4_zps11a9c720.jpg

    For any new kids that want to know about about the things we are talking about, I'll try and provide pictures.


    An old Don Hume 2X2X2 dump pouch
    an HKS speedloader
    and a Speed Strip

    And, I didn't have to dig any of this stuff out of a bin. They all go along with either the 3" 65 I carry most days off duty or, the Smith 642 I've carried in my pants pocket of my uniform for most of the last 20 years or so,
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  6. fragout

    fragout Member

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    Just wanna say thanks to all that shared thier knowledge here.

    Please keep it up.


    11B
     
  7. Tortuga12

    Tortuga12 Member

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    Can we get this "sticky"-ed? Would sure like to see this discussion continue to grow! Maybe with enough help I'll be able to shoot my k-frames worth a darn!:banghead:
     
  8. tubeshooter

    tubeshooter Member

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    This has been a great and informative thread!


    Thanks to all - and I hope it continues.
     
  9. MrBorland

    MrBorland Moderator

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    I love that 2X2X2 dump pouch. Gonna have to get one.


    Here's a tip & trick: Keep a skinny pen handy.

    A case that ends up under the ejector star is a hassle. And one that manages to fully re-insert itself into the charge hole can really ruin your day. Plucking it out with your fingers will take a minimum of 30 seconds to a minute. So, keep a skinny pen handy. Use it to simply push the case out from the front of of the cylinder. It's also handy for ejecting .45acp rounds that were shot without a moonclip.

    Before sticking the pen in your pocket, though, make sure it's skinny enough to fit inside a case.
     
  10. tomrkba

    tomrkba Member

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    I always use AZOOM Snap-Caps for safety. This forces me to open the action, swap out the ammo, stow it in the gun safe, and double check I'm using Snap-Caps. The revolver can handle the hammer landing on an empty chamber, but the wall cannot handle a bullet.
     
  11. Derry 1946

    Derry 1946 Member

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    Second the motion on a sticky. For a fast reload, consider the half or full moon clip. The plastic ones work great and are very inexpensive. A 1917 .45 is an intimidating beast muzzle-on.
     
  12. Thaddeus Jones

    Thaddeus Jones Member

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    Well I'm surprised, and glad, that this thread is still going. Good on y'all!

    Did we cover placing your thumb behind the hammer on reholstering? Its a good habit to get into. While the only guns I've ever seen go bang while reholstering were NOT REVOLVERS, its still good to get in the habit of placing your thumb on the at rest hammer spur, as you reholster, so as to be able to detect any hammer movement early on - BEFORE something bad happens.

    I was out and about the last few days and was able to peruse quite a few gunshops. Lots of revolver deals and steals out there right now. I picked up a cosmetically challenged but mechanically magnificent 4 inch 15-4 for $250 OTD.

    I looked at another 3 inch 10-8 but it was more of a custom hybrid revolver. Aftermarket barrel and unknown trigger job and aftermarket parts. I passed.

    Also had the opportunity to shoot a little bit and help two young ladies learn how to run their J-frames and work a speed loader.

    That experience led me to my current thought. "Doing more with less". What with the ammunition shortages and price gouging going on, its hard to come up with 150 rounds for a range session these days. Let alone the $200 for 150 rounds that these damn scalpers want for it!

    Well, another beautiful thing about a revolver is you can still train without shooting live rounds. Just break out the snap caps and speedloaders and get to work. Draw, dry fire, and practice a fast reload. Then repeat! :)

    IMO you will get much more out of your next range session, where you can concentrate on fast accurate fire using 50 rounds, when you have your revolver operating basics already down pat. Thats what I've been doing.

    How bout y'all? ;)
     
  13. sgt127

    sgt127 Member

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    When times get tight, the old Smith Model 18 and .22 Diamondback get to see a little more daylight. I always thought the Model 18 and a 15 (or 19)were the perfect set of guns.

    I have shot thousands of rounds through those two guns. Hope to shoot thousands more, and, the guns will last forever shooting that round.

    Once you load a revolver, close the cylinder and, point it in a safe direction. Pull the hammer back just a little bit to drop the cylinder stop and spin the cylinder. (DON'T touch the trigger). You can assure yourself that there are no high primers on any of your rounds.

    The trick of reaming out the flash holes on .38 cases, priming them and then pushing them through parrifan bars, cookie cutter style, for indoor practice rounds? I shot an awful lot of those in my garage. I always used regular primers. The only reason you reamed them out a little is so the primers don't back out and tie up the gun.
     
  14. shootr

    shootr Member

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    Thanks to all for the great tips!
     
  15. JERRY

    JERRY Member

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    good speedloaders will make a world of difference when under stress.

    i recommend safariland comp I, II, or III depending on your revolver.
     
  16. BADUNAME2

    BADUNAME2 Member

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    The advice to dry fire is excellent. In a lot of ways, dry fire can be better practice than live. Some of the ways in which this is true are obvious, like the fact that it's cheaper and more available, since you don't need to buy expensive ammunition, or make special trips to expensive ranges to do it.

    Other ways are less obvious, however. First, defensive shooting, (which is, by and large, the subject of this thread) requires many more skills than simple marksmanship. Drawing, smooth operation of a DA trigger, target transitions, and movement are all important considerations for a self defense shooter which are easier to practice dry and at home than they are at the usual square range.

    Even more than that, however, since dry fire doesn't bring with it the sound and fury of live, it won't add to, and may even decrease a tendency to anticipate a shot or flinch.

    I've long thought, (and my competition experience reinforces this) that the best, fastest, and soundest way toward improvement is good instruction, followed by lots of dry fire, and a little bit of live. Good instruction, to learn what and how to practice. Lots of dry fire to really train those skills into the subconscious mind, (often called muscle memory.) And live fire to keep a check that the dry fire isn't drifting toward shortcuts that make dryfiring better/faster, but undercut live fire performance, like weak grips, and the like.
    If the skills thus developed can be tested and refined under the stresses of competition, one may have achieved the perfect regimen.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2013
  17. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    Very true, Mat. Further, big brains have found out that simple mental visualization, after of course mastering fundamentals, is tremendously valuable in high end competition.. ie Olympic level whatever.
     
  18. FERLACH

    FERLACH Member

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    A lot of good ideas on here.
     
  19. tomrkba

    tomrkba Member

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    Reading list:

    The Gun Digest Guide to the Revolver by Grant Cunningham
    No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan
    Guns, Bullets and Gunfights by Jim Cirillo
     
  20. wiringlunatic

    wiringlunatic Member

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    THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I didn't grow up shooting much and love my revolver (a now somewhat beat from carrying Taurus 82) It shoots way better than I do, but with some of these tips, I may start to catch up. :D I'm always very hesitant to dry fire -- is it absolutely impossible to harm a gun doing it? (excluding .22's of course) I know dry firing is good practice, and the semi guys do it all the time, but I still hate to. Gotta get snap caps I guess and gotta get a speed loader. Currently I only have the 6 in the gun with me. I'll vote for the sticky -- whoever decides that, PLEASE do it -- someone's life may depend on it. Until they sticky it, I guess we just need to keep bumping it! :evil:

    Ok TJ, MrBorland, etc, we're waiting for more tips!
     
  21. BADUNAME2

    BADUNAME2 Member

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    There are no absolutes, but no modern, quality centerfire should be hurt by it. And in the highly unlikely event that one is, how much is a firing pin? $20? Compared to the potential cost of not acquiring all the skill you can muster?
     
  22. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    A broken firing pin or mashed firing pin spring could cost one plenty if it happened at the wrong time. The risk can be substantially reduced if one uses a set of quality snap caps - available from www.brownells.com as well as others.

    Dry firing is good for both the shooter and the revolver if this simple precaution is taken.
     
  23. Thaddeus Jones

    Thaddeus Jones Member

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    I think we mentioned getting the maximum benefit from every round fired, when practicing. Especially these days when ammunition, if you can find it, is double the price it was just six months ago. So, I've been doing drills with the last twelve rounds in my 50 round boxes.

    I use a B27 standard target and two 5x7 index cards for this drill. Take the two index cards and tape one vertically on the head of the silouette. Take the other and tape it horizontally in the center chest of the target. Now, move the target out to the one yard line.

    Most indoor ranges prohibit working from a holster. Thats all well and good. If you can work outside drawing from a holster for this drill, thats probably more realistic practice, but indoors you can simply lay your revolver on the stall table in front of you. No matter, as the point of the drill is practicing "flash sight picture" and trigger control, giving you fast accurate hits. Any hit not on the index card is a miss. Your round broke the edge of the index card? Yes, sorry, you missed! ;)

    We will be firing "fast pairs" for this drill. The difference between fast pairs and "double taps" as I was taught, is that we will be taking the time, however short that is (and the shorter the better!) to form a flash sight picture and control our trigger during our two double action shots.

    We are working "hot" loaded with live ammo so all safety rules will apply. Whether you are working from the holster or the table at the range, we are enforcing the "four rules"!!

    Now, load your revolver and lay it on the table in front of you facing down range. Check your stance. You are practicing to fight, so stand as you would when preparing to fight. Relax your shoulders and arms and BREATH! Steadily and normally. Look at the index card you intend to shoot first, it matters not which one you choose. Look on the card for where you intend the first shot to strike, now see the second point of impact. ENVISION both hits on the card. If you believe it will happen and train to make it happen it WILL HAPPEN!

    Pick up your revolver quickly and safely, adjusting to your proper grip as you bring the sights up and align them with you intended point of aim. We are using a FLASH SIGHT PICTURE which means that you will be putting your front sight on your point of aim and aligning your rear sight as you start your trigger press. Altogether, at the same time, and as quickly as you can safely do so.

    So, pick up - adjust grip on the way up - support hand coming together as front sight is approaching point of aim - trigger starting to roll back - front sight is just about at point of aim - rear sight is almost aligned - trigger approaching the break - TLAR (that looks about right!) BANG!! - reposition the sights coming out of recoil - front sight coming down to point of aim trigger half way back rolling not slapping aligning revolvers rear sight TLAR!! BANG!!

    There!! You have 2 hits on the center of the 5x7 index card approximately 5mm apart in under two seconds!! WELL DONE!! :) What? :eek: You only had one hit at 1 o'clock and the second shot was off the card? :( No matter. Those index cards aren't shooting back and its the first time you have done this. At least you are out here trying to improve your skills. You are making the effort to learn! you should be proud of yourself for doing this. I'm proud of you for doing it! :) The drill may appear simple but it is not easy.

    Eventually, with time and practice you will be able to get two fast hits, millimeteres apart, at distances out to 15 yards and maybe beyond that. It all depends on you. You are the final arbiter of whether you are accomplished, skilled and well armed with your revolver. Not anyone else.

    I wish you good, safe, fast and accurate shooting! :) Best, TJ
     
  24. MrBorland

    MrBorland Moderator

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    Well, there's dry fire, and there's dry fire. I can't say for certain that all guns are immune to damage from the latter, and, depending on the gun, fixing a firing pin can cost considerably more than an Andy Jackson. When in doubt, use snap caps. That said, I've got several tens of thousands of dry fire trigger pulls on a couple of my revolvers without snap caps, and all is well to date.

    The benefits of "dry fire" go way beyond trigger control, BTW: Dry fire is an excellent way to improve your gun handling skills, for example. A quick & smooth draw from concealment, a good index (i.e. natural point of aim), efficient reloads, movement from one position to another, and transitioning from one target to another are all things that can be work on via dry fire drills without even having to pull the trigger. There are plenty of these types of drills available on-line. Check out Ben Stoeger's 15-minute plan, or Matt Burkett's nifty online drills. You really don't need a par timer or special targets, btw. Just you, your gun, a speedloader, dummy rounds, and a holster.

    Dry fire is effective as a trigger control and gun handling exercise, but to really get the most out of dry fire, you must also use dry fire as a vision exercise. To shoot well, you need to see what you need to see. It's this ability to see what needs to be seen that makes a good shooter a good shooter. I go back to my coin drill - nice trigger control, but zero visual input, so had I actually been shooting, the target would've likely told a sad tale.

    Seeing what needs to be seen is a skill that's deceptively tough to do, though, so it needs to be worked on just like any other skill; done correctly, dry fire is where this skill is strengthened. Conversely, dry fire without regard to visual cues can reinforce shooting without critical visual cues, which is a euphemism for bad shooting.

    Good shooting, all!
     
  25. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    Very good words. Dry firing is very valuable. I've never had a problem with any centerfire DA revolver breaking parts by dry firing.. and I dry fired a few a bunch. There's always a risk though.
    I did break one Hi-Power firing pin retaining plate after I don't know how many dry-fires and 50,000 rounds. The plate cost like a dollar and was/is simple to slip in.. all good.
    As others said, learn to call your shots, no matter how fast or slow and you know if you hit the target, ammo or no. Make sure to hit it though.
     

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