Fort Hood shooting

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by skippy1729, Sep 3, 2022.

  1. dannyd

    dannyd Member

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    You can believe what you want, but my last deployment to the Sandbox ( the Navy as been there off and off from 1946) I told my sailors if you have a gun in the barracks bring it over to my house and I will put it in the safe. My kitchen table looked like a pawn shop. ;)
     
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  2. scaatylobo

    scaatylobo Member

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    HOW IS IT AT ALL POSSIBLE ,for millions of cops to carry daily in all states.

    And for the most part,NEVER shoot anyone they did not intend to shoot ?.

    Last I saw,we get recruits to the police job in pretty much the same way the military does.

    Average men & women that want to serve.

    Give them a gun and lots & LOTS of training and if in a uniform,they NEED to be armed.

    They fail and have ND's or whatever you like to call your bugger finger on the go button when it should NOT be.

    They find a job that involves no guns.
     
  3. N555

    N555 Member

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    If you look straight up above the firing line it's not quite that bad. It's like they built it 40 years ago and haven't spent a cent to fix up inside.
    Some how the roof doesn't leak.
     
  4. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    Belonged to the Air Force from 1947 to 1994 (and was Army Air Corps property back to around 1940).
    And, as a Joint Reserve Base, it gets all kinds of traffic over there.
     
  5. bearcreek

    bearcreek Member

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    Most military members have only a tiny bit of training with a rifle and zero with a handgun. Far less than the average cop.
     
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  6. dannyd

    dannyd Member

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    That's definitely not always true in the Navy depends on the command. Three ships I was assigned to were shooter's because the Captains of the ships was a shooter. We shot all the small arms all the time 50 caliber down to the 45's at least one a month and every week on deployment.

    It's all about money in the military and ammunition comes out of your operating budget, so some commands only do the minimum.

    One Captain had the Supply Office check all the east coast for any command sending ammunition to savage quit often and then we would go get it. The other benefit of that is moving ammunition will definitely make the crew pass their PT Test.
     
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  7. Reloadron
    • Contributing Member

    Reloadron Contributing Member

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    My early Marine Corps days circa 69 to 71 I was stationed at Cherry Point NC. Our issue rifles were kept in the barracks armory as well as any personal weapons. I had a handgun and a 30-30 rifle in there. Personal weapons could be checked in and checked out anytime. My issue M14 had to be back in the armory every evening by I forget what time.

    During 72 my MAG was deployed to Vietnam where we carried our rifles anywhere we went, I went in as a courier so I also carried a M1911A1. One day in DaNang main compound some idiot maybe 10 feet from me managed to discharge his M16. Had it slung over his shoulder, obviously round in chamber and safety off. Idiot was lucky he didn't shoot himself in the head. My best guess was he managed to snag the trigger with clothing. The muzzle blast was maybe a few inches from his ear. Hell, scared me half to death and my living half wanted to shoot the sob! :)

    My take was always that base commanders (or a ships captain) had say so as to privately owned weapons under their command.

    Ron
     
  8. EIB0879

    EIB0879 Member

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    I went back to Ft. Benning in 1982 for IMPC. Unlike previous trips I drove there. I had a modified Rem. 11-48 12 gauge that was (barely) legal that I kept behind the seat so I could get to it quickly. During orientation we were told to check any personal weapons with the Provost Marshall. I went there and walked in with the shotgun. The SSG behind the counter looked at me and the shotgun and asked what I needed.

    Told him what we were told and he said "yeah sir you don't have to do that". He said keep it out of sight, don't shoot anyone, and you will be fine.

    I'm sure that wouldn't happen now.
     
  9. bernie

    bernie Member

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    Handgun training used to be pretty much nonexistent in the army outside of a few MOS’s and probably still is. I will never forget being called to the new sergeant major’s office after 12 days in the field. I could not figure out what I had done to get called into his office. When I walked in he told me to close the door. By now my heart was racing. He then told me that he had been issued an M-16 for his entire career and he was now issued a sidearm. He then told me that word was that I was a weapons guy and would I show him how to strip it and clean it. He then told me there was no way he was going to ask an OFFICER how to do it.
     
  10. dannyd

    dannyd Member

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    Everything is relevant; in the Blue Water Navy except at a port visit we had very little chance of using small arms or being attacked by them. If we were going to get killed it was coming from a fire or explosion how it happened war or peace time lack of training it did not matter. So knowing how to use a rifle or pistol was not as relevant as people may think.
     
  11. Hartkopf

    Hartkopf Member

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    Pretty crafty of the OP to ask a silly, unanswerable question about hearing loss from a mass shooting but then throw in a little opinion at the end of the post. An opinion which inspired most everyone to talk about what they’ve seen on military bases over the years. o_O
     
  12. lemaymiami

    lemaymiami Member

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    My Army service was 1968 to 1971, with a short tour to a bad place that last year... A few years later I signed up and was accepted into police work - my career wasn't a long one - only 22 years.. Our armed forces restricting weapons on base was a very good idea in my opinion.... Just as many goofballs in the service as in civilian life - and a lot more opportunity to go breaking bad (check out the suicide rates in active service - not to mention former servicemen..). Not the way it should be - but as a practical matter controlling the weapons for those under your command is a necessity in my book.... I won't mention the active fraggings and other serious stuff I saw when I was with the 101 Abn in 1971... When I tried to tell my Dad about it afterwards (he was a 28 year Engineer officer who had done two tours in Vietnam, 65 and 69...) he shut me up and I could tell it bothered him greatly...

    My police era did not include the armed citizen movement - that came after I retired out. I'd like to say that in the shooting incidents I came into contact with during my career were at least occasionally with a good guy, armed doing good things - but that's just not the case, with very rare exceptions. Mostly they were tragedies either criminal or personal... All of them collectively is part of the reason why I've never carried a sidearm from the day I retired until today. If that's a mistake - I'll be the first to find out...
     
  13. alsaqr

    alsaqr Member

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    My hearing is shot. The VA awarded me 40 percent disability for hearing. i never wore hearing protection when shooting, but that ain't the cause of my trashed hearing. Spent over 20 years in US Army EOD and was too close to some big kabooms. The over pressure from a big blast plays havoc with hearing.
     
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  14. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    Just a few notes from the hearing clinic guy...

    I believe just about every person entering the service now undergoes a hearing test, and most also receive a test at separation. Hearing loss and tinnitus feature prominently in service-connected disability claims. The folks involved with the Fort Hood mess almost certainly know what happened with their ears. The trick is finding them and getting them to post their audiograms here. :scrutiny:

    "Auditory exclusion" is the name for being unaware of loud noises during extreme duress. It is a brain function rather than an ear function and does not protect the ears to any real extent. Compare it with running through a thorn bush while being chased by a bear: you may not notice the scratches at the time, but they are still there.

    Noise-induced hearing loss can result from either (or both) moderate exposure over a significant period, or severe exposure during a brief period. OSHA, for example, publishes charts showing approximately how long a person can be exposed to a particular volume before hearing damage becomes likely:

    full.png

    Note that above a certain level -120 dB, in OSHA's opinion - instantaneous hearing loss may occur, and of course the average gunshot is much louder than that.
     
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