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Forty years ago.

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by CajunBass, Jul 3, 2018.

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  1. CajunBass

    CajunBass Member

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    When I was just a young fellow, I let Bill Jordan and Skeeter Skelton talk me into believing that the 4", Model 19 Smith & Wesson was the best all round handgun anyone could ever own. I bought my first handgun, a brand new, in the box, 4" Model 19, not long after that.

    Model 19's have come and gone over the years, but I've never seen anything to make me think differently. I've owned as many as three or four at one time, but thought I had sold off my last one a year or so ago. (I did keep a 66-1 however.)

    Then S&W announced a new "Classic" Model 19. I knew I was going to buy one. I hadn't bought a brand new S&W in forty years. This would be the one.

    20180628_165025_zpstwbanri2.jpg

    20180628_1650450_zpsoxal33hg.jpg

    It's not the same as the old guns. The new Mustang is not the same as the old one. Things change. The barrel is 4.2 inches, rather than just four. I'm told the extra .2 makes it legal for sale in Canada, but to me it just makes the barrel look a LOT longer. I know it's not, but I'm sort of a 4" barrel snob. :) I'll learn to live with it I'm sure.

    The finish is not the bright blue of the past. It's more of black than a blue, but still looks nice. The grips are thinner and more comfortable than the target grips of the past. A HKS speedloader also clears them with ease. The trigger is smooth in DA, and crisp in S/A. I only know two ways to describe a trigger..."good" or "bad." This one is good.

    I haven't shot it yet. I picked it up a couple of days ago, and just have been too busy. I probably won't this week because of the holiday crowds at the range. But next week, when the crowds go back to work, I'll see how it works.
     
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  2. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Howdy

    Curious why you sold them all if you still think so highly of them.

    Incidentally, about the same time I bought my first centerfire revolver, a Model 19-3 with a six inch barrel. Still have it and all the goodies, it would be one of the last revolvers I ever sell.

    Model_19-2_zpsdc8c8de7.jpg
     
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  3. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    I'd rather have an old P&R 19, but would consider the new one if modern metallurgy made them more tolerant of a steady diet of full loads.

    As it were, I have pre lock 586-4 4" which looks the part other than full underlug, and I'll never have to worry about it shooting loose.
     
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  4. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

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    Forty years is a long time...
    Maybe Bill and Skeeter knew a good thing when they saw it.
    Model 19 is classy.
     
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  5. CajunBass

    CajunBass Member

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    Because I wanted to. I can always buy another one. Which is what I just did.

    Actually let me modify that. I would not have bought another used one. When I sold the last one, I was done with them. I kept a 66-1 to fill that niche.

    But I wanted to buy a NEW gun. It's been a long time since I bought one that NO ONE had owned before me. Silly? I suppose, but that's it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2018
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  6. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    It is still a good argument. Very fond of mine.
     
  7. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Howdy Again

    It wasn't so much the metallurgy as the design. K frame revolvers have always (well,not with the Model 1899) had a relief at the bottom of the forcing cone to clear the gas bushing of the cylinder. That is why they would sometimes fail, the forcing cone could crack at that spot. Here is a photo of the relief at the bottom of the forcing cone of a K frame Model 13-2. If S&W has managed to redesign the cylinder so that a relief at the bottom of the forcing cone is no longer necessary, than the problem of split forcing cones with hot 357 Mag ammo will go away.

    Clearance%20Cut%20Model%2013-2%20SN6D03706%201979_zpsgxfbk0zg.jpg
     
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  8. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    So what is the situation with the forcing cone? Does it still have a relief at the bottom?
     
  9. CajunBass

    CajunBass Member

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    No.

    Model19FC_zps8daromje.jpg
     
  10. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Thanks for the photo.

    Which raises another question.

    What is the shiny round thing in the round hole below the cutout for the extractor rod?

    Is this one of the models that uses a spring plunger to secure the front of the yoke in battery?
     
  11. CajunBass

    CajunBass Member

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    Yes, that's the front locking bolt. It's not the same as the one on my Model 69, so they must have either made a change at some point, or it's a total redesign for the K-frame.

    I'm not the mechanical guy at all. :)
     
  12. mcb

    mcb Member

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    Take a few more pictures of that forward locking mechanism I am curious.

    Nice looking revolver by the way!
     
  13. CajunBass

    CajunBass Member

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    Thanks!

    These are about the best I can do. The locking bolt fits into the recessed area on the yoke, just ahead of the cylinder. In the first picture it looks like an extension of the cylinder flute.

    20180703_124141_zps530oiich.jpg

    20180703_124220_zpsqab5vpf6.jpg

    I assure you that anything that looks like finish wear, is either light, or some dust that has settled on it.
     
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  14. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Yes.

    The way I understand it, the spring plunger in the frame is taking the place of the plunger that used to engage the recess in the front of the extractor rod.

    This is the way it used to be done, with a spring loaded plunger slung under the barrel. The plunger engaged the recess at the end of the extractor rod. This in turn pushed the bolt back into the frame to allow the cylinder to latch in place at the rear too. The new system is less expensive to produce than the old system.

    ejector%20rod%20mod%2017-3%201975_zpsd5d4ugff.jpg




    So, am I correct your new revolver lacks the locking plunger which engages the front of the extractor rod?
     
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  15. CajunBass

    CajunBass Member

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    You are correct sir.
     
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  16. mcb

    mcb Member

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    My 627 has a ball detent but in that case the ball detent is in the crane and it engages a notch cut in the bottom of the ejector rod shield.

    One advantage to this is if you ejector rod comes loose and start backing out it has to back a long way out before it locks up the revolver. With the old latch in the end of the ejector rod it only took a little bit of unscrewing to lock your revolver up and it was a pain to get it screw back in enough to unlock it.
     
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  17. BobWright

    BobWright Member

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    Well, I for one think the Model 19 was good, but the Model 586 is great! The Model 586 replaced all my DA .357 Magnums, including a Model 28 and a Colt Python. Only a 2 1/2" Model 19 remains in my battery.

    Bob Wright
     
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  18. NIGHTLORD40K

    NIGHTLORD40K Member

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    Probably my favorite of the new production Smith wheel guns.

    Ive got plenty of old P&R Smiths including two M19s, but I rarely run magnums through them- they are too nice, too old, and too valuable for flogging anymore. I use my 686 when I want to make a bigger BOOM, lol.

    That thing looks like it could take a pounding and keep on smiling, very nice!
     
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  19. Gordon
    • Contributing Member

    Gordon Contributing Member

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    To lock the crane up at that point is much more precise and that helps align the charge holes with forcing cone. The forcing cone appears shorter and thicker . Both of these updates probably have alot to do with reducing possible problems :)
     
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  20. tightgroup tiger

    tightgroup tiger Member

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    When I first saw the new 19 I thought about buying one also. I still might. I bought one of the Classic Model 57s and it has been great. I think you will really enjoy it.
     
  21. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Smith and Wesson addressed that problem back in the early 1960s by putting a reverse thread on the extractor rod.
     
  22. mcb

    mcb Member

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    My 627 would argue with you. Spent a USPSA match tightening that left hand thread after every stage. A little low-strength loctite solved the problem, the left hand threads did not.
     
  23. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    I could make an argument for each of these.

    Ruger Security Six Pic 2.JPG
    586-3 With Ultra Dot Pic 1.JPG
    Model 19 Pic 4 @ 85%.JPG
     

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  24. MidRoad

    MidRoad Member

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    Does the new model 19 have the same lock up system (ball detent) as the new model 66/69's?
     
  25. Bo

    Bo Member

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    I have an old Model 19-3, I'll never get rid of.
    sQIKr8n.jpg
    On the other had, when it came time to buy a new revolver, I chose the new 586 L-Comp PC with the 3" bbl.
    It's sweet!
    5gsBeso.jpg
    6Rm3lEN.jpg
     
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