Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Getting a Premium rifle,scope combo for my son.

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Beak50, Feb 10, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Beak50

    Beak50 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2011
    Messages:
    257
    Location:
    Harrisville P.A.
    My Father in law and I have set a budget of $3,000.00 more or less to get my son a Rifle with Optics.My son is 14 and 6ft. 200lbs so were thinking about a good Mag round.Ive heard "read about"Sako's,Weatherby sub-moa ect..He has mastered the 30-30 first gun after .22,shoot's the .308 superbly so now we want him to get to a Magnum rd.No it's not Magitis we just feel he should be able to handel and know what ever recoil handling properties that come with the family of Belted-Mag's.His birthday is still quite a few month's off.any in-put would be appreciated.
     
  2. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    Messages:
    1,960
    Location:
    Deep East Texas
    Don't know what "Magnum" you have in mind, but it can run the scale from a mild step up from the .308...... to rattle your teeth. :(

    I would pick carefully, based on his perception of recoil and his ability to handle it. Personally, I wouldn't "push it" and just buy the lad a nice rifle/scope combo that doesn't generate more than 28-30 lb. ft of recoil.

    Let him enjoy that for a few more years (if not a lifetime) and then let him buy his OWN magnum when he feels a need for it.

    Just bumping him up...as a "right of passage" might be doing him a disservice, but he's your boy and you know him the best.
     
  3. Beak50

    Beak50 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2011
    Messages:
    257
    Location:
    Harrisville P.A.
    Good thought since we already have a wide variety of gun's and caliber's to pick from.Just figured alot of you guy's have been in this position yourselve's and might have had some suggestion's.thank's Beak
     
  4. Stealth01

    Stealth01 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    Messages:
    84
    Have to agree, drop the magnum mind set! Your son is big... but he's young so don't force this macho concept on him. With your price point, besure to look at Coopers, they make a great "guaranteed" sub MOA rifle!!
     
  5. Smith357

    Smith357 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    Messages:
    1,024
    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio
    Are you planning a trip to Africa? If not then I too would drop the magnum idea. I would lean more towards a 6mm Varmint caliber first, since it appears from the cartridges you have listed that there is a hole there. With you budget you can go with a semi custom over a box stock mass production rifle.

    Cooper Montana Varminter
     
  6. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    637
    Do you load your own ammo? If so, consider a Cooper in .338-06. Very roughly speaking the .338-06 gives you the energy of a .300WM, the trajectory of a .30-06, recoil between the two, and a bigger hole. Factory ammo is available but expensive.

    A Cooper in .338-06 is my dream rifle and is within your budget.
     
  7. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    14,744
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    I have no problem spending $3000 or more on a rifle and scope. I just wouldn't give one to a 14yr old. Most 14yr olds are not responsible enough to handle a $3000 rifle, let alone own and use one. Nor would I buy a 14yr old a belted magnum, no matter how big he is. Handling recoil is 99% mental. He's 14 years old, he hasn't "mastered" anything. I'm 37, been shooting and hunting all my life, have bought and sold over 100 guns, shoot 2000-3000rds a month and I've mastered nothing but the art of killing time.

    If you go through with it, get him something he can use, rather than the biggest and baddest. Give him something he can grow with and really get attached to. I would go no larger than the .30-06 class of cartridges. Hell, get him a really nice Cooper .22LR that he can spend the rest of his life hunting squirrels with. It'd be money a lot better spent than a .300Whackenboomer that gathers dust because he's afraid to shoot it.
     
  8. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    637
    Somebody woke up on the wrong side of the bed. The guy is proud of how well his son shoots and wants to encourage/reward him by buying him a nice rifle. His choice. Can we just answer the guy's question without preaching or peeing all over his son's shooting ability?
     
  9. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    14,744
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    Not preaching or peeing. He's free to to as he wishes with my advice, which is very well intended. My intent, which you are questioning, is to prevent them from buying a 14yr old too much rifle and discouraging his interest in using it. It was worth at least what he paid for it. Sorry but he did say in another thread that the rifle was "like new" three months ago. :rolleyes:

    November 1st, 2011:
     
  10. taliv

    taliv Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2004
    Messages:
    22,098
    if your primary interest is hunting, then getting him a magnum may be cool. he can dream about going out west and shooting something big with it. and he'll only shoot it a few times per year anyway so cost of ammo isn't that much of an issue.

    if your primary interest is proficiency in shooting and a general purpose nice rifle, then the most important criteria is availability of reasonably-priced ammo so he can actually shoot it a lot.

    if you want to get him something really really cool, that is impressively magnum, but cheap to shoot and good for hunting, he needs a 12-bore:
    [​IMG]
    http://pacificriflecompany.blogspot.com/
     
  11. buckhorn_cortez

    buckhorn_cortez Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2010
    Messages:
    523
    If you want a belted magnum, I'd look at the .300 Winchester Magnum. The armed forces are now using that as one of their standard sniper calibers, and it can be used for everything from deer hunting to elk, bear, etc.

    Lots of rifles available from nearly every rifle manufacturer. I was in Sportsman's Warehouse earlier this week, and noticed .300 Winchester available from all of the commericial ammunition manufacturers in a variety of bullet weights.

    Another good choice is the Winchester Short Magnum (WSM) which gives nearly identical performance to the Winchester Magnum in a smaller case. The only problem I've seen is that the ammunition manufacturers are just coming up to speed with providing a wide choice of bullet weights in that caliber.

    An extremely good round is the 7mm magnum. It is a .338 necked down to 7mm. Not as many varities of bullets available for it as the .300 hundred, so it is not quite as flexible unless you reload.

    Weatherby makes a .300, but then you're buying either Weatherby ammunition or brass and that's extra money.

    The key to the whole thing is the riflescope. It is easier to shoot an inexpensive rifle with an expensive scope than an expensive rifle with a cheap scope.

    Scopes need to be defined by what you want to do with the rifle. Hunt or target shooting - or a mixture of both. What is the anticipated nearest target and what is the anticipated furthest target? Target or sniper scopes are larger and heavier as the scope will have large objectives for better performance in low light and large turrets to rapidly dial in windage and elevation. Hunting scopes are smaller so they can be easily carried.

    For the money, and general use, it would be difficult to surpass the Leica 3.5 - 14. Leica glass is every bit as good as Zeiss Hensoldt and Schmidt & Bender, and the Leica mechanical construction is robust. At $1500 that would give you $1500 for the rifle - and you should be able to get a really good bolt action for $1500.

    You have to consider that you can upgrade a rifle. Bed the action and barrel if needed, put in a new trigger, change the stock, change the barrel. You cannot upgrade a scope. It is what it is going to be for its entire life the day you buy it. The only way you improve the scope is by buying a different scope.

    A Savage Long Range Hunter with the adjustable cheek weld, muzzle brake, and AccuTrigger in .300 Winchester Magnum or .300 WSM (around $800 new) and a Leica 3.5 - 14 scope ($1450) and you have $800 left for ammunition - now that, would be really hard to beat for nearly any type of use.
     
  12. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Messages:
    10,089
    Location:
    Georgia
    Do you hand load? If so getting a magnum round is no problem. You can load them to near 308 levels for reduced recoil when the magnum power is not needed. As he gets older, or needs the extra velocity you can always load, or buy full power loads.

    For one rifle to hunt anything, anywhere for the rest of my life and with that budget I'd buy a stainless/synthetic Kimber in 300 WSM. They are light enough to carry up and down the steepest mountains. Accurate enough for anyone. I really like the 300 WSM a lot better than the belted magnums. They work in short actions reducing rifle weight about 1/2 lb in the Kimber line. They give you about 99% of a 300 win mags velocity with only about 90% of the recoil, work better in shorter barrels, and are proving to be extremely accurate. The new 1000 yard benchrest record was recently set with one.
     
  13. snakeman

    snakeman Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    2,079
    Location:
    texas
    I know others will probably disagree but my choice would be a er shaw mk VII in 257 weatherby with a stainless helical fluted barrel in a nice laminate stock with a leupold vx3 scope from their custom shop and spend the rest on ammo
     
  14. jehu

    jehu Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Messages:
    396
    What is the young lad trying to shoot/kill???
     
  15. gotboostvr

    gotboostvr Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Messages:
    1,348
    Location:
    Buckeye Country
    I'd think a nice M14 would be a good present, timeless and a bit of a jack of all trades. A great American rifle with some history would be a fantastic hand me down family rifle.
     
  16. Curt Blunt

    Curt Blunt Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2007
    Messages:
    61
    Location:
    Sacramento, California
    The boy would pretty much have to enlist to get an M14. Don't get me wrong, the M14 was my service rifle (yes, I'm old) and I dearly loved it and have an M1A in the safe.
    In my opinion, dad should take junior to well stocked gun store and find the rifle that fits him. I also fail to see the logic in wanting a belted magnum. I should think you'd be more interested in having the kid hit the target. So, maybe another .308 since ammo is cheap enough to practice more if you don't handload. Or a .270 or maybe a used custom in 6.5-06 if you do reload.
     
  17. TwoEyedJack

    TwoEyedJack Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2011
    Messages:
    489
    Location:
    Southwest Idaho
    I faced a similar dilemma with my sons. The oldest is left handed, which is a challenge. I started him off with a Remington 7600 pump in .270. I thought he would really like this since he was really good with a BPS shotgun. Bottom line, he was never comfortable with it. So we traded it in on a left-hand Ruger Mark II stainless laminated with a Leopold 3-9X40, also in .270. He loves this gun and it fits very well with the hunting we do.

    The next son is much more of a hunting fool and wanted to hunt big game when he was younger than the first. I found a Weatherby Vanguard youth in 7MM-08 that came with two stocks in the box. He used the shorter one, and beat the crap out of it, for the first year, and I handloaded some really mild rounds for him to practice with. Now at 14 he is using the longer stock and full-power loads with no problems.

    It sounds like your son is not going to need a shorter stock! Given your budget, and assuming your son wants this gun to hunt, you could do worse than a Cooper Model 56 in 7MM mag. and a Leupold VXIII
     
  18. jehu

    jehu Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Messages:
    396
    I set my 14yr old up this year with his 1rst deer rifle and he killed a 90lb doe at 130yrds, a 150lb 6pt buck at 210yrds, and a 60lb doe at 60yrds. the rifle is a Remington 70 XTR 308 which is a decent rifle but I belive the Swarovski Z3 3-10X42 scope I put on it was more important to his success. this was his 1rst year deer hunting and rifle shooting.
     
  19. SharkHat

    SharkHat Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2012
    Messages:
    132
    Location:
    Missouri
    I'm a sucker for a Weatherby, so....

    Weatherby Mark V Deluxe in .257 Wby Mag
     
  20. henschman

    henschman Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2010
    Messages:
    2,880
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    My recommendation would depend very much on the role... if you want it for hunting, what type of big game? If for a sniper rifle/2A purpose rifle, what ranges are you contemplating using it at? If it's for some sort of competition shooting, what type? Or do you not really have a specific purpose, but are just wealthy enough to be able to buy him a $3,000 rifle just so he can learn what it's like to shoot a belted magnum?
     
  21. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Messages:
    4,514
    Location:
    SE GA
    Im going to answer your question the best and shortest way I know how but it will not be the answer you are looking for.

    If it were me and I were going to spend the big bucks on a premium-esque rifle, I would want it to be my "forever" rifle. The rifle I would use the most and was versatile for a wide range of hunting.

    For me that round is the 7x57 Mauser and that rifle is the Ruger No. 1. This combo is not for everyone but for a premium forever rifle you can just go ahead and excuse magnum calibers unless it is a 17 HMR (Hornady Magnum Rimfire).

    I would go towards the more premium CZ rifles and a nice Leupold scope.
     
  22. Mr.GunCrazy

    Mr.GunCrazy Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Central Iowa
    .325 WSM would be a fun cartridge for him. Sure was for me.
     
  23. matt 7mm

    matt 7mm Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2011
    Messages:
    99
    my first centerfire rifle was was a rem 700 243 after reading all the gun mags as a teenager i decided i needed a 375h&h for that someday hunting trip because the 375 will take anything on the planet.after a couple of years of huntin woodchucks with the h&h i figured maybe i should step down a little so i traded that for a 338win mag then after a couple of years of wood chuck huntin with the 338 i figured i didnt realy need that either and i wanted a lefty so when i finaly got to go on n elk hunt i traded the 338 for a left handed 300win mag(this was before thw short mags were around) i still have the 300.in the mean time i actualy USED the 243 enough to wear out a barrel i had it rebarreled and still shoot it more than any other rifle i own.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  24. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Messages:
    14,376
    Location:
    Elbert County, CO
    If I had that kind of a budget, I'd be looking at a Kimber. Either an 84L Classic select or the Mountain ascent model, both in .280 AI.

    That still leaves a big scope budget, and I'd go with either a Leupold VX-III or Bushnell Elite 6500. You'll still have money left over for ammo (or reloading equipment for that .280 AI).

    Why? Well, for one, it's a Kimber. They're well made, accurate, attractive and light weight (especially the mountain ascent at 5 lbs, 5 oz) .280 AI will kill anything in the lower 48 no problem.

    http://www.kimberamerica.com/rifles/model-84l/classic-select-grade

    http://www.kimberamerica.com/rifles/model-84l/mountain-ascent

    If you're dead-set on a belted mag, there's always the 8400 Super America:

    http://www.kimberamerica.com/rifles/model-8400-magnum-calibers/superamerica

    It is an average weight rifle, though (7-1/2 lbs)
     
  25. Pacsd

    Pacsd Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2010
    Messages:
    413
    Lucky lad to have such generous mentors in the family. I've got a few bucks set aside and thinking about a custom gun however, at near 70, I wonder of I'll get all the use out of it I'd hope to. Much unlike the potential years of service a youngster will get out of a spendy set up. I've looked at the Cooper's (as mentioned earlier) and really like em. I do agree with the remark about spending THAT much money on the kid. I'd seriously look at something alittle less expensive and in a non mag caliber. However, a 7MM Mag will handle anything on the No. American continent. Some pretty nice Wxby's can be put together well under 3K.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page