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Getting back into Reloading after more than 10 years - Questions

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Neutron Boy, Oct 13, 2020.

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  1. Neutron Boy

    Neutron Boy Member

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    Hi all

    I am getting back into reloading after a long time off - I am now retired and have some time on my hands. I am actually busier in my personal life (no more work life) than ever before.

    Well after drooling over the Ruger Precision Rifle for a long time, I finally found one that was available in 6.5 Creedmoor. I bought some dies, Starline brass, 140 gn bullets, StaBall 6.5 powder, and have a large supply of primers from before.

    I loaded for many calibers in the past, but for my 22-250, I took care to minimize the bullet to lands distance. I was checking the internet to see what that distance should be and it seems like 0.010" to 0.020" is the usual. I saw some articles on how to measure for optimal COL and it seems everyone is buying gauges for this. Years ago, I read about somebody that simply took a sized and trimmed piece of brass and used a Dremel to slice the neck vertically. This loosens up the grip on the bullet. You then put the bullet in the rifle and close the action to push the bullet into the case. That COL should be from the bolt face to the lands. You then reduce that dimension by the 0.010" or so stand off and you are in business. I did this with my 22-250 and got fantastic chrony results. I loaded up in 0.2 grain increments for 9 different powder weights and ran them over the chrony. The data for my best load had a Standard Deviation of 6.4 fps and a spread of 17 fps for a 5 shot string. I think that spells success.

    Question 1) I couldn't find any reference to the COL method I described above. It seems cave man simple and effective. Is is a bad practice?

    Question 2) I also noted that in my recent searches on COL, it seems like people like to use fire formed cases to make the COL measurement. I feel like that is the wrong thing to do because I full length size my cases. Resized brass would be a truer representation of the accurate COL for my rifle. The only way it would not be were if I were to not resize or I guess, only neck size.
     
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  2. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    Sinclair
    Sinclair Comparator Body, .22, 6MM, .30 Cal inserts, 30 Degree Shoulder Insert @ 40%.JPG
    Sinclair 30 Degree Bump Gauge Insert @ 50%.JPG

    Whidden
    Whidden Shoulder Bump Gauge 2.jpg
    Whidden 6 Dasher Case Guage @ 50%.JPG
     
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  3. Neutron Boy

    Neutron Boy Member

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    thanks Walkalong, I did see that video. Is there anything wrong with the method I described?
     
  4. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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    Nope, still practice. I don't slice cases, preferring to size necks just enough for light tension. I also use an ogive gauge to measure COAL since bullet tips vary far more than ogives.

    No. The sizing of a case used to measure COAL makes no difference provided it chambers.
     
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  5. Neutron Boy

    Neutron Boy Member

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    thanks edwardware. The way I have done it in the past doesn't involve the bullet tip, but it is likely a bit forward form the ogive. I dont know that there should be too much manufacturing deviation just above the ogive.
     
  6. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    Just not as accurate/repeatable. Lots of people do it that way though.
     
  7. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    The Sinclair tools pictured are a great way to measure from base to ogive. One style insert is for that, while the others are for measuring shoulder position.

    Bullet Comparator & Bump Gauge Body - Holds inserts

    Bump Gauge Inserts - Measure shoulder position

    Bullet Comparator Insert - Measure base to ogive as well as just bullets by themselves
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2020
  8. Neutron Boy

    Neutron Boy Member

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  9. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    Tubb 115 Gr DTACs in 6 Creed. Haven't played with seating depth yet, these are .010 to .015 off the lands.
    Load # 21 - Tubb 115 DTAC - H-4350 - Fed 210M Targets.JPG
     
  10. PWC

    PWC Member

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    Don't say this over at AccurateShooter; you'll get banned for relating "dangerous" information.....I know; I did and I was.
     
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  11. lordpaxman

    lordpaxman Member

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  12. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

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    A lot of the ELD's bullets can tolerate a long jump. Don't get hung up in chasing the lands.

    Only do min sizing, to only move the shoulder back 0.001", any more will shorten the life of the brass and is not needed.

    Let us know how that 6.5 StaBall powder works out.
     
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  13. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    I have an “acceptable” load for 108 ELDs in 6 Creed with SaBall 6.5 I shot it Saturday at a match.
     
  14. Cemetery21

    Cemetery21 Member

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    OP, like you, I don't have OAL tools, except for an old Stoney Point tool I get out when I remember I have it.
    I have split the neck, as you describe, or just paint a seated bullet with a felt marker and change seating depth until I see the lands marking the bullet.
    But, I've not run a long ways down the precision rabbit hole. Just enough for 300-400 yard prairie dogs, and I don't do that anymore.
    Welcome and congrats on the retirement and especially the move.
     
  15. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    You can work up great loads and not know where your lands are.
     
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