getting packed for elk hunting is no fun

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Mr. Hill, Oct 11, 2021.

  1. Ugly Sauce

    Ugly Sauce Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2020
    Messages:
    1,571
    Actually, my biggest task when preparing for any hunt is: "what rifle and pistol should I take". I suspect that most on this forum, or any firearms forum has more than one rifle and one pistol. So on that issue, I usually change my mind about ten times before I go.

    ML hunting, I always take my Jeager and a cap-gun for back-up, for super wet weather, but pairing it with a sidearm is hard for me. Should I take my lucky Remington New Model Army in Navy caliber? Should I take a .22 pistol? Which one...the AirLite or the High Standard? Maybe I should take grand-dads Luger. Or the Webley. The Webley does well on grouse with .45ACP shot loads. The 1862? The 1860? My Plains Pistol? Or the M95 Nagant? or....or....or.....???!!!

    If I'm out during a modern season, with a friend or the son, and just looking for Cougar or Bear, it's worse. Should I take the 03A3? A Trapdoor? The Monkey Mauser?? Just stick with the Jeager? Pack the 1861 Springfield around and build up the biceps? Something in .30-30 flavor? Dang...haven't used the .44 Carbine for years and years....or...or....!!

    THAT...is my trouble with packing. :)
     
    Boattale likes this.
  2. Ranger99

    Ranger99 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2021
    Messages:
    463
    Location:
    Republic of Texas
    If you hunt a muzzleloader only season
    here, all the decision making has been
    done for you and you don't have to fret
    over it
    Firearms that load through the muzzle
    only, no BP revolvers with a cylinder.
    No breech loading modern peestolla
    or long guns allowed afield while hunting

    It's not a hardship IMO
     
    Boattale likes this.
  3. Ugly Sauce

    Ugly Sauce Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2020
    Messages:
    1,571
    Yikes!
     
  4. Boattale

    Boattale Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,086
    Location:
    SWMO
    I'm going elk hunting for the first time in December. Camping in the ranch lodge. The main things I need to remember are a gun, some warm socks and an extra pair of pajamas.:cool:
     
    Shanghai McCoy and Boomholzer like this.
  5. Boomholzer

    Boomholzer Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2021
    Messages:
    227
    View attachment 1032906
     
  6. GooseGestapo

    GooseGestapo Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Messages:
    4,850
    Fortunately the snow was “only” 12”.
    Needed chains first day to get back to hunting area. Needed gaiters to walk in snow, walking staff, and shades. My was it bright!
    Started seeing elk! Practically every day.
    Hit one 2- days ago. Held for heart shot to break leg. 150yd. Broadside. Elk jumped, entire herd (7) bolted and ran. Due to thick timber (area burned ‘17), and steep terrain couldn’t get a second shot. Followed blood trail (double in spots). 1.5mi later, lost trail...... sigh. No elk.

    Had heard of 12 at 400yds lased. Brother talked me out of shooting as it was 1.5 mi back to truck!

    Elk hunting is a LOT different than deer hunting. Conditioning to walk 2-3mi a day at 10,000’ elevation is just one.
     
  7. Mr. Hill

    Mr. Hill Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Messages:
    299
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
    I’m back. No elk, unfortunately. It snowed 8” the day before I arrived. Then another 7” two days ago. The roads were a mess. The plastic enclosing the main meeting area almost collapsed from snow.
    It was a lot of fun! Good trip.
     
  8. illinoisburt

    illinoisburt Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2014
    Messages:
    1,612
    Location:
    Central Alabama -- recently relocated from Chicago
    In my experiences on DYI hunts, that was a mistake. Even if you are only 5 minutes into a week long hunt if you are given an opportunity you should always take it. Plus if you aren't willing to pack out from some spot because of distance back to camp then why did you bother to hunt there in the first place? Sure you will have work to do getting an animal out but at that point it is cold and you have plenty of time. Besides if there is snow it gets a whole heap easier to pack out by putting 75 to 100 pounds at a time on a cheap plastic snow toboggan. Pulling a sled uphill is greatly preferred to backpacking and downhill is just fine.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice