Getting rid of cigarette smell on multiple guns.

Discussion in 'Shooting Gear and Storage' started by Analogkid, Apr 19, 2016.

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  1. Analogkid

    Analogkid Member

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    I recently purchased a few old bolt rifles and a NIB g1 Glock from a coworker.
    A few Years ago the Coworkers Dad died and He inherited the house and everything in it.

    The guy was a Super heavy smoker. Like 3 packs a day kinda guy for decades.

    I didn't know this until I went to pick the guns up at His Dads house. The House stills smells like decades worth of chain smoking. I didn't take any notice other than the house reeked until I got them all out in the truck and drove home. HOLY COW What a smell!!!

    These were all in his bedroom closet and he smoked up a storm in that room I assume. The two rifles have finished wood stocks and are mint otherwise and the Glock is New in the 1st gen bock but has a thin black foam backer inside.


    I wiped the rifles down a few times with a rem oil soaked rag wood and all. It didn't help. They still reek. The Glock smells just holding it. I haven't done anything to it yet. Whats safe to use on the Polymer handle that wont hurt it?


    I'm real close to trying to find a bottle of hoppes 9 and soaking them all in it..........for like a week!


    Weird question but I'm sure someone else has had this issue and found a resolution ...I hope.


    Thoughts?
     
  2. Schofield3

    Schofield3 Member

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    Bottle of hoppes 9! maybe leaving them in soaked rags of gun cleaner over a couple days.....
     
  3. ericuda

    ericuda Member

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    Ballistol? Or like folks say, it's a glock. Soak it in mud, hose it off and shoot it.
     
  4. Analogkid

    Analogkid Member

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    I'm not sure If I want to soak a Mint first gen glock in mud. :) Thanks though.
     
  5. Jlr2267

    Jlr2267 Member

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    I'll 2nd ballistol, although you might prefer the cig smell
     
  6. Spade5

    Spade5 Member

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    Dryer sheets

    If you could put them inside of some sort of container, a cardboard box would be great and put a few dryer sheets in they might soak up some of the smell. It will probably mean changing them every couple of days until it is gone.

    It may not work but it doesn't cost much.
     
  7. au_prospector

    au_prospector Member

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    charcoal briquetes

    I would try laying them in a large plastic container and covering them top and bottom with charcoal briquets.
     
  8. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    You could just keep it simple and let them lay in the sun for an afternoon- like on your roof (just write a note so you don't forget there's guns on your roof). Go to chemical warfare if that doesn't work.
     
  9. Jim NE

    Jim NE Member

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    I HATE cigarette smell, too. But until you've cleaned the guns with Hoppe's number 9 - which you should do anyway - there's no point in soaking them in it (even if that was intended as hyperbole. :) ) I would think the only part of the gun to retain the smell after they're cleaned would be the wood stocks...in that case...baking soda, like in the refrigerator maybe (?) Not ON the wood, of course, but nearby. Hoppe's won't hurt polymer, of course, and be sure to throw away all the rugs, cases or rags they may have been wrapped in, as that may be part of what you're smelling. Good luck.
     
  10. Mp7

    Mp7 Member

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    Vinegar 10%.

    Of course need to rub off thoroughly and oil afterwards.

    Vinegar is very good for getting rid of smells.
     
  11. 444

    444 Member

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    I am into radio.

    I have purchased used radio gear that smelled like smoke and I did the dryer sheets thing already mentioned and it worked pretty well.
     
  12. OilyPablo

    OilyPablo Member

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    Shoot them! Then clean, then shoot them some more.

    Hoppe's three or four times first should really cut into the smell. Actually the ammonia in Hoppe's will help. I would also hit the plastic with Simple Green, scrub, rinse, dry well and shoot. The wood, start with Murphy's Oil Soap.

    Dry and oil well between shooting. Setting outside while you have an eye on them is a good idea. Don't store in your safe until at least treated a couple times, unless bagged with dryer cloths.
     
  13. Scooter22

    Scooter22 Member

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    Most of the smell is in the stocks. Remove the B/A and wipe the would down with a cotton cloth dampened with mineral spirits to get any surface contamination off. This generally won't hurt any finish. Then hang them to air out. It takes awhile but the smell diminishes to where it doesn't bother you. I or my family never smoked so I hate the smell. But after airing them they don't bother me. On wood you could also seal bare wood where the inletting is with some laquer. I'm sure that area soaked up the smell more than the finished surface. Or simply rub some Vicks under your nose when shooting them.:rolleyes: Good Luck.
     
  14. buckhorn_cortez

    buckhorn_cortez Member

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    Two items that are generally used to get cigarette smoke smell out of objects are baking soda and ground coffee. Both will absorb the smell from the object.

    You could try field stripping the Glock and putting it in a 1-gallon plastic bag and then covering it with baking soda or ground coffee, sealing the bag and leaving it overnight.

    For the rifle stocks, remove them from the gun, put them in a box and cover the surfaces with baking soda or coffee.

    You may have to treat them more than once to get all of the smell completely out of the guns.
     
  15. blarby

    blarby Member

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    Best solution I've found is ionizing.

    We get pieces like this from time to time at the shop.

    Place the guns upright in a closet, put an ionizer in there with the cord under the door, and let it do it's thing for a couplea days.

    I'd strongly advise against vinegar. It's known to be bad for most bluing finishes, and citric acid crystallized in stock material is only a small rain event away from a ruined finish.
     
  16. RetiredUSNChief

    RetiredUSNChief Member

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    Remove the stocks and clean the bejeebers out of everything. The metal parts will be the easy part.

    Wash the finished parts of the stocks down with a grease cutting dishwasher soap/water mixture. This will clean any surface contamination off, including tobacco tars. Repeat a couple times, if necessary.

    A really, REALLY serious cleaner/stripper would be to rub down the stocks with MEK. You can pull a lot of stuff out of wood with this, including the finish. So be prepared to refinish the stocks when this is all over.

    Store the cleaned and preserved metal gun parts in your gun safe, or wherever you normally keep your guns.

    Expose your wood stocks to the sun and fresh air. And by "expose", I mean essentially keep them stored where sunlight and fresh air can get to them for several weeks. Time will eventually leach out most of the odors this way. The advent of the start of warmer weather right now makes this an ideal time.

    Since many people often go months, or years, without shooting certain guns, you should have no problem with keeping the wood stocks stored in open, sunlit air for as long as it takes.

    Refinish the stocks afterwards, if required.

    Oh...and feel free to shoot them and clean them any time you wish during this time. Just don't store them with your other firearms until the smell fades away.
     
  17. desidog

    desidog Member

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    DO NOT USE VINEGAR it will destroy the bluing.

    I'd get a bag of charcoal brickets and a big tupperware container (since you can use the charcoal afterwards) or a lot of baking soda.

    I bought a car that had cigarette smoke imbedded in it, and put a big bowl of baking soda in it for a few days... and it leached the smell out.
     
  18. highlander 5

    highlander 5 Member

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    I bought a couple of room deodorizers from Home Depot. Had a room in the apartment that I rented that smelled badly of cigarette smoke,they worked like a silica gel pack and absorbed the smell over a few day. The only problem is do you like your firearms to smell like citrus or spring morning.
     
  19. WardenWolf

    WardenWolf member

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  20. TEAM101

    TEAM101 Member

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    I've bought several guns under the same conditions. Break them down, hose the metal with gun scrubber until clean and re-oil, clean the wood with mild detergent and lemon oil, leave them sit in the sun for a day or two and wipe them down with lemon oil again. I had two that were so bad they dripped brownish-yellow tar like material from them when cleaned. It took a while for the wood to release the odor on those.
     
  21. ddc

    ddc Member

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    Time and patience works wonders. I inherited a box of paperwork after my dad passed away that positively reeked. A year later and there is not much left. I would think firearms which had passed through a couple of cleaning cycles would fare even better. I'm hoping it's not going to be a big problem.
     
  22. jeepnik

    jeepnik Member

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    As someone mentioned above coffee. Unless you don't like the smell of coffee, I do.
     
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