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Give me some ideas for a beginner's pistol please

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by CMV, Feb 20, 2019.

  1. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    This isn't relevant to the OP's situation, but it occurs to me that if you want to teach kids to shoot a handgun, then a Ruger Bearcat is a great choice to start with. Since it's a scaled down single action with a scaled down grip, it will fit small hands very well.
     
  2. Bartojc

    Bartojc Member

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    My wife and both girls have used my SR22 to start. Very reliable.

    -Jeff
     
  3. Charlie Martinez

    Charlie Martinez Member

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    I agree with schmooey1617. Semiautos can be very unsafe in the hands of a group of complete novice shooters. A .22 revolver used in single action mode until they know how to safely handle the handgun. I don't know if there are many still out there in good shape but break open style .22 revolvers by H&R are of decent quality, fairly cheap & could do the job.
     
  4. Thomas Mayberry

    Thomas Mayberry Member

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    I did 20 years in the military (two services, Army and Air Force) and served 23 years in two police departments . I have never seen or heard of new recruits starting off with 22's (though in some cases it would help). In the military the only time I saw .22s being used was to reduce ammo cost using .22 adapters in our M-16s during re-qualifications.

    I do advocate that new shooters start with a .22 unless they have an immediate need for a defensive caliber.
     
  5. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    Interesting. I do know that I did read that back when Police Officers carried service revolvers that some departments used the Model 19 S&W as a service revolver, and trained new recruits with the same size Model 17 K22 revolver. But, I have no idea how prevalent this idea was.

    And it seems to me that the military .22 training rifles that I can recall dated to WW2 and to possibly as late as the 1960s. I can't recall seeing a U.S. version, but presumably they must have existed. The ones that I recall seeing were British and Canadian Lee Enfield Mark III SMLE and Number 4 rifles.
     
  6. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    While I advocate learning to shoot your firearms with intended caliber ammo, I enjoy shooting drills with my Glock 22/23/27 using 40-9 conversion barrels and 9mm ammo. Also enjoy shooting drills and plinking with my ARs using CMMG 22LR conversion kits using much cheaper 22LR.
     
  7. Gridley

    Gridley Member

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    For the US, look up the Mossberg M42 (I've also seen it listed as the 42M). Bolt-action .22LR for those who don't feel like looking it up. I have never seen any data on how many troops used them in training or for how long, but it was certainly used for initial training for some troops (I'd guess especially early in the war, when equipment of any type was scarce and the M1903 was still common in infantry units). Sub-caliber equipment also existed for crew served weapons and even artillery (I've got a US ordnance catalog from circa 1945 that has some examples).

    I have not heard of any modern US service branch using .22LR for training, but considering the lighter recoil of the 5.56NATO (vs. .30-06 or even 7.62NATO) and the larger budgets of today it may just not be worth it.
     
  8. Labguy47

    Labguy47 Member

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    We each got to fire 5 rounds down range at a black backstop from a Colt Cadet.22lr. All 81 men from my company in boot used one gun and shot at nothing for pistol quals. Same goes for the rifles we got during our final week. We used one M-16 and fired 3 blanks on the same indoor pistol range. The first gulf war had just broken out a week before graduation. US Navy Corpsman 8404.
     
  9. SigP229R

    SigP229R Member

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    I am a bit prejudiced but, I think the 229 would make a good starting point. If you look around a bit you can probably find a nice PD trade in for about what you are looking to spend or maybe just a bit more.
     
  10. golfer_ray

    golfer_ray Member

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    I had a friend who hadn't shot much and we started having lunch together. She found out I was a gun owner and asked if we could go to the range sometimes at lunch. She certainly wasn't a good shot, but one day we rented a DA/SA revolver, and in SA mode, she nailed the target. So if you want a confidence builder, that's a good starter.
     
  11. DWrso

    DWrso Member

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    Ruger 22 Mark series -Browning Buckmark are great pistols for novice shooters. Then move up to 9mm pistols. My club has annual events for ladies and we train them and give them a choice based on their experience and preference.
     
  12. tactikel

    tactikel Member

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    +1 for the Neos .22. It is easy to operate, only jams if very dirty, and is very accurate. My Wife and 2 Daughters evolved into excellent shots using a Neos.
     
  13. SCMikeyP

    SCMikeyP Member

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    I've made the mistake twice of thinking a full size 9mm would be mild enough for a first timer (both females) to shoot and enjoy. Dead wrong. If I don't pick up a .22, I'll definitely rent one before making that mistake again. Hate getting newbies off to the wrong foot...
     
  14. P5 Guy

    P5 Guy Member

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    Crossman air pistol.
     
  15. theotherwaldo

    theotherwaldo Member

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    I'll tell you what I've done.
    Back when I was in college I introduced a number of folks to shooting. Problem is, I was on a college student's budget.
    So, I'd start them off with an R/G 66 "cowboy" revolver that worked very well. I marked the outside of one chamber with a dab of White-Out and would load that one chamber to start. Once they had mastered basic gun handling I would start loading all cylinders, then move on to letting them load, then they would graduate to center fire: use of a Ruby .38 Special revolver - basically a clone of the S&W Model 10.

    My total investment for these fine firearms was fifty bucks and an old truck bumper, the ammo cost more.

    Most of my new shooters were quite satisfied with this training. Some moved on to semi-autos, others picked up revolvers, a few dropped the whole idea.

    I'd have introduced them to semi-autos but I didn't have any at the time... .
     
  16. Jessesky

    Jessesky Member

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    TBH if the person has never shot before, I think it is better and safer to start them on a rifle. It’s much easier to have muzzle awareness which is not intuitive to a new shooter.

    AR’s are great for fundamentals. If you’re restricted to pistols for some reason, any full size 9mm is good
     
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  17. golden

    golden Member

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    I know that you listed semi-auto's, but I would recommend a mid size .38 Special revolver like the S&W model 10 or the adjustable sight model 15, with a 4 inch barrel. I would then start off with wadcutter target loads to expose them to a higher level of recoil, then the 130 grain Air Force load which is only slight heavier. After that, a 125 grain +P round like the REMINGTON 125 +P sjhp. If they are still comfortable with the +P round, then the 9m.m. should be fine.

    If the person your training is small framed, a smaller revolver like the old COLT D-frames, the Detective Special or Police Positive or the CHARTER ARMS 6 shot .38 Special revolvers might fit their hand better.

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2019
  18. sbwaters
    • Contributing Member

    sbwaters Contributing Member

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    The SR22 is easy. The only thing I dislike is that the safety operates the reverse of almost every other safety in the world.

    Actually, after a half our of practice with the SR22, I had them try a shot or two with a CZ75B 9MM and then a 1911 .45 ACP so they learned bigger calibers were nothing to be afraid of.
     
  19. 9mmskng

    9mmskng Member

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    Thinking it to death Bud. 4"bbl, 38spl revolver & 9mm Glock G17!
     
  20. Bartojc

    Bartojc Member

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    Agree. After all these years of owning it still seems weird.

    -Jeff
     
  21. doubleh

    doubleh Member

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    Since this is to be for people that have never/once shot a gun start with the 22 rimfire. Low noise, low recoil so there is nothing scary about it. I can thing of nothing much that would beat a Ruger SR22 for the people with small hands and A Ruger MK IV 22/45 for those with larger hands. Start them with one round in the magazine. When they demonstrate they can handle a gun safely increase the round count by one and continue upward as they get more comfortable with shooting.
     
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  22. armedwalleye

    armedwalleye Member

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    If you're gonna wind up at 9mm "big and heavy", why not start with .22 "big and heavy" like a bull barreled Ruger Mark pistol? I start non-shooters with the 5.5 Mark bull, then the 6 7/8 Mark, then have a discussion about the mechanics of bullets and the process of firing them, that heavier guns dampen recoil. Then transition to an SR-22, so they get the feel for a little more recoil from the same sized cartridge to illustrate the point. From there, transition to a 9mm with 115 grainers in a heavier pistol, like a steel Star BM or a third Gen Smith 5906. All steel, nice and heavy, then ask if they want to try something a little lighter, where I'd go to a compact Gen # smith, like a 6904, then, if they want, something even lighter, like a 9mm XDs or a Ruger SR9c. Another nice discussion re: heavier bullets, more recoil, and, if they're willing, a full size 1911.

    Had my sister in law and wife go through a basic gun safety first, then, with reinforcement of the principles, started them both on the 5.5 bull barreled Mark. One ran all the way up to the light nines, and decided she liked the Mark the best. The other shoots everything I own, down to the mouse guns and derringers, and one of them is a .357.
     
  23. Thibaut

    Thibaut Member

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    I started with a Beretta Puma 70 - .32 acp. Slide bite bled all over me and the guy trying to stop the bleeding. I persevered and commenced proper lessons with stripping and putting it back together and then shooting a M&P .22 LR. I've graduated to a 9mm semi and airweight revolver and several other models. It scares me to think how naive I was back when. A THR moderator chastised me for my attitude; once upon a time. He was right and I learned my lesson well. Thanks, GEM.

    I'm not sure that group lessons would have worked well for me. Good luck. Be careful.
     
  24. Sig-Lover

    Sig-Lover Member

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    For $300, you might be able to get a used glock 17, but if you want one to cherish and shoot like a dream, get the Sig P226. I also like tghe CZ-75 and the Berretta 92 FS.. But if I could only keep on, it will be my Sig P226 Legion. It is a wonderful gun to own. If you want a new gun, most decent guns will cost closer to $600.00
     
  25. fireside44

    fireside44 member

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    Had to agree with this. I don't wanna be around a beginner with a pistol if they haven't even handled a gun before. Im averse to muzzle sweeps and beginners with pistols are notorious for a lack of muzzle disciplne.

    Once they have some basics down with a rifle then I'd say a good j or k frame Smith in .38. Is all one will really need and other pistols and calibers will offer marginal, if any real world demonstrable improvements. Be safe op.
     
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