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Give Your Children an Early Inheritance

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by RomanKnight, Jun 28, 2005.

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  1. RomanKnight

    RomanKnight Member

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    If we would all do this, the country would be in better shape, and our future in better hands. Read, and pass it along!

    Give Your Children an Early Inheritance
    by Al Doyle

    Don't wait until you're in the grave to give the kids something of real value. I'm not talking about imitating the biblical father who handed over a large sum to his prodigal son. In some cases, this early inheritance can cost less than $100 per child.

    How can a parent do this? Buy a child a gun – and take the time to teach how to use it responsibly and safely. When the child turns 18 (rifles and shotguns) or 21 (handguns), it becomes their personal property. There are several reasons for parents to take a proactive role in training kids in this vital skill.

    Youngsters and teens in all levels of the government school system are subjected to a constant barrage of anti-gun and anti-Second Amendment propaganda. If a child never experiences the responsibility and pleasure of gun ownership and never gets to use these tools (that's all a gun is when you get right down to basics), their views will be shaped by socialist indoctrinators.

    While a parent can spend as much as they want for a gun, literally hundreds of reliable firearms can be obtained for modest prices. In some cases – such as old bolt-action military rifles, .22 rifles, single-shot shotguns and the occasional .22 or .38 Special revolver or East Bloc surplus semi-auto pistols – the price tag can be $150 or less.

    Don't worry if limited funds are keeping you out of the AR-15 or customized pistol market. The first rule of gun ownership is to have a gun. You can always upgrade later. When it's crunch time, a basic, reliable weapon in hand beats the photo of the "gonna get it someday" high-priced dream piece. To use an analogy, a real bowl of soup beats an imaginary steak every time.

    This isn't esoteric theory. Many freedom-minded parents who believe that gun ownership in America isn't a guaranteed forever thing are planning ahead with their children in mind. Here's how one preparedness-minded man handled the challenge.

    Tim and his wife Anne have five children. This is a one-income family, with Tim earning a very ordinary wage while Anne homeschools the kids. The family's modest gun collection consisted of a .32 ACP pistol and two no-frills .22 rifles. Tim doesn't hunt, so he never had a desire for anything bigger. That was until he realized that his children would need something they could call their own while firearms can still be bought privately in most states.

    While he's more of a casual gun owner than a much-maligned "gun nut," Tim understands that the Second Amendment has a fair number of enemies in both the Democratic and Republican camps. Since his knowledge of the market is limited, Tim enlisted a gun-savvy friend as an advisor. They hit paydirt right away, buying a new in the box .410 NEF shotgun for $50 from one of Tim's co-workers.

    The little single shot is at the low end of shotgun power range, but its mild recoil and easy handling have made it a popular item around the house. The next purchase – a like-new Mosin-Nagant 7.62 x 54R bolt-action carbine for $90 – is somewhat more potent.

    This old Soviet rifle was in excellent condition. Made for service in World War II, the Mosin sat in a warehouse for decades before being exported to the U.S. in recent years. Mosins are known for ruggedness, decent accuracy, and cheap surplus ammo – a perfect combination for Tim's low-budget arsenal. Tim's oldest son Greg (age 19) enjoyed shooting his uncle's .270 deer rifle, so he got the Mosin and its stout recoil.

    Wanting to expand his horizons, Tim shopped at a local gun show. He learned a great deal about different models and current values, but found little in his price range. His mentor spotted a nice 1960s vintage High Standard .22 revolver for $100, which is below the going rate. Tim and his friend checked out the gun, which comes with a nine-shot cylinder. The seller said he would take $95, and Tim snapped up another good deal.

    Four months passed before Tim made his next purchase. A friend was going to advertise his SKS rifle in the local shopper for $175. After Tim expressed an interest in the semi-auto, his friend realized he could save the cost of the ad and the hassles of answering phone calls and haggling by offering Tim a good deal. The $165 price included a gift of three boxes (60 rounds) of 7.62 x 39 ammo.

    Four down, one to go before each child would have a start in practicing the Second Amendment. Anne rushed home to let Tim know about the guns she saw at a garage sale.

    A nice Marlin .22 rifle stood out among the junky offerings. The seller wouldn't budge on his $90 price for the popular Model 60 semi-auto, but Tim gladly paid up. It isn't just a guy thing, as Tim's daughters also enjoy target practice with the user-friendly .22 rimfire.

    Tim and the family now go to a local shooting range for occasional practice. The .22s are the usual weapons of choice, as they have little recoil, and the ammo is incredibly cheap. These range sessions are a great time for the family, providing recreation, togetherness and training at a low cost.

    Some of the many members of the Colt .45 ACP and .44 Magnum Fan Clubs might scoff at Tim's unpretentious collection of firearms, but they're missing the point. There are millions of Tims – and potential gun owners – who would like to get more involved with this sport/pastime, but they just don't have large amounts of cash to lay out for high-end arms. That could change as incomes grow and time passes, but don't knock the novice who is sincerely eager to learn.

    Think of it this way: Every new shooter and gun owner is one more convert to the cause of freedom. Gun grabbers and professional control freaks such as Dianne Feinstein, Richard Daley and the pond scum at the United Nations absolutely despise the thought of a growing number of American gun owners. That alone should be reason enough to encourage more people like Tim to teach their children how to competently shoot and safely handle a gun.

    June 27, 2005

    Al Doyle [send him mail] has worked as a newspaper reporter, magazine staff writer and freelancer since 1983. He won't allow his children to attend government schools.
     
  2. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

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    If I'd had children, they'd have grown up shooting—and not attending public school, as well.
     
  3. No_Brakes23

    No_Brakes23 Member

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    As the product of both Christian Private Schools and Home Schooling, I am curious just what evils you think are in the public system, and what benefits are achieved by private or home schooling. In my case I believe it did more harm than good.

    As for the cheap guns, I am all for it. I definitely see a NEF shotgun in my son's future.
     
  4. SteveS

    SteveS Member

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    I don't really see what this has to do with growing up learning how to shoot. I attended public schools, as did my father and grandfather, and we all grew up shooting. As for my children, I can say they will grow up shooting. In terms of schooling, it depends on where we live and the quality of schools, public or private.
     
  5. Justin

    Justin Moderator Emeritus

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    I can't speak for or against home schooling, but I will happily point out that the public school systems are nothing more than a grist mill that dehumanizes the individual, kills the spirit, and quashes any sort of creative or unorthodox thinking through both systemic and peer-based pressure.
     
  6. nico

    nico Member

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    the same is true for two cousins of mine who were home schooled. Even in one of the worst non-urban school systems in the country, I still got a much better education than either of them. If the parents do their job, kids won't be affected by the moral and political opinions of some teachers who choose to push them on their students. They might even get a lesson in how to coexist with total idiots when there's no other option. There are a lot of things you learn at all but the worst public schools (and you might even learn them there too) that you'll never learn from home schooling.
     
  7. rock jock

    rock jock Member

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    Wow. I'm sorry you had such a bad experience in school. That explains a lot.
     
  8. rwc

    rwc Member

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    And I thought this thread was going to be about the IRS $10K annual gifting exemption to estate taxes. :D
     
  9. fjolnirsson

    fjolnirsson Member

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    I'll second that. I have noticed rural schools turn out a more balanced individual than urban schools, but they still are far from ideal. I remember back in 2nd grade, when suddenly we weren't supposed to "use your imagination" any more. Suddenly, it wasn't about how we arrived at a solution, only that we got the correct one.

    I'm planning to homeschool my daughter. Even if we are no longer Americans, I'd like her to know the history of what was once a great nation. Perhaps she'll be one of the leaders who rebuild after our country burns to ashes.
    Gee, I'm feeling a bit morbid tonight. Must be from reading all those opinions about how we'll never fight because we're too comfortable. Aw, nevermind..... :(
     
  10. bigun15

    bigun15 Member

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    I'm growing up shooting right now (15 yrs. old, hunting for 2 of those) and when I have kids they will grow up shooting also. I will make sure of that.
     
  11. No_Brakes23

    No_Brakes23 Member

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    I missed the "govt schools" part of the first post.

    I agree, however, the private Christian schools I went to were just as bad, if not worse, and the Home Schooling made for some severe social adjustment problems when it was time to enter the real world.

    Coming from the Home School environment, (In the 80's, California was NOT a HS-friendly environment,) I can understand the "govt schools" comment, as that mentality was rampant in the HS movement at the time. I was forced to lie about where I went to school, and fed a steady stream of indoctrination about how the evil non-Christian JBTs were going to take me away. I am NOT kidding about this. It was like a living in a Chick Tract.

    Unfortunately the Home schooling is coming back to haunt me now, since the local police and sheriff's want all applicants to have a High School diploma or GED. The Corps didn't have a problem with me not having a diploma, as I had almost 100 semester units of college completed.

    Ya know, I bet this issue is worth it's own thread, I am not really trying to jack this thread with an argument about Home versus Public versus Private schooling...but if I keep commenting on it, that is gonna happen.

    But I am not sure which forum that thread would go into, how it would be firearms related, and it is liable to get nasty, so maybe I should just let it go.
     
  12. 1911 guy

    1911 guy Member

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    My son's rifle

    I bought my son a .22 bolt action the day BEFORE he was born. Not kidding. I can afford it now, who knows about 5 or 10 years from now? As for the schooling, both have pros and cons. Decide what you want for your kids.
     
  13. Onmilo

    Onmilo Member

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    I am giving mine an early inheritance.
    Kicking, screaming, and crying they are still going to College.
     
  14. usp_fan

    usp_fan Member

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    I enjoy shooting my 3 year old son's .45 colt Ruger Bisley. He'll get to shoot it all he wants when he can handle it, and it's his when he's 21.

    --usp_fan
     
  15. Missashot

    Missashot Member

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    I'm not sure about the type schooling my daughter will receive. There are pros and cons to each. (Besides,she is only 6 months old now). But I am pretty sure that she will be taught to shoot at a fairly early age. (Her dad is trying to find an anniversary edition 10/22 for her now) :) He and I are looking forward to being able to take her to the range with us for "Family day". :p
     
  16. Marshall

    Marshall Member

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    :what: Oookay.
     
  17. DorGunR

    DorGunR Member

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    My son went to private schools from 4th grade thru college. I started him shooting at age 5, now he is 30 yo and an avid shooter. I'm giving him my gun collection a few guns at a time, I'm 72 yo and I won't be shooting as much as I once did.
     
  18. richyoung

    richyoung Member

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    +1 and you forgot the NEA "indoctrination" you get - guns bad, America bad, Founding Fathers bad, world government good, state's rights bad, Europe good, "Turd World" better, right-wing freedom fighters like the Contras bad, Communist kleptocrats like the Sandinistas good, business bad, wacko environmentalism good. men and women not just equal politically, but interchangeable, a "living" Constitution, etc. :barf:

    (and this was in an American school in Germany run by the Army!)
     
  19. The Rabbi

    The Rabbi member

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    I have two kids, daughter age 12 and son age 10. Daughter is traditionally schooled and going to public school next year, Son is homeschooled. Both have been taught how to shoot and daughter competed in women's shoot at our club last month.
    The advantage of homeschooling is that parents have an opportunity to pass on their knowledge and values to their kids. If the parents are dysfunctional psychos then that is what will pass. Fortunately most parents are decent people who think primarily of their childrens' well being rather than whether they will be reprimanded because X percent of their class failed.
    Schools seem to have an overwhelming guns=bad mentality. I am sure in rural areas it is different but in most places that is it. There is a definite ethos that schools pass along and gun culture is outside it.
     
  20. Andrew Rothman

    Andrew Rothman Member

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    I think I'm your long-lost son, Dad. :)
     
  21. Justin

    Justin Moderator Emeritus

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    Awesome! Backhanded sympathy! Rock Jock, you're a swell guy, but it's misplaced. I received most of my education at a private school. :p
     
  22. Zundfolge

    Zundfolge Member

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    Rock Jock obviously learned his manners in the Public Schools. :scrutiny:



    While there are bad private schools and bad home schools, when you compare home schooled and private schooled kids to the public school educated, the private and home school educated score way higher on average.

    Over the years I've known many home schooled and private schooled people ... I have yet to find one who wouldn't have been several grades ahead of the average student I went to public school with.


    The way I see it, you're chances of running into a "bad" or substandard public school are much greater then a bad or substandard private/home school.

    Plus the leftist/collectivist indoctrination crap drove me nuts in school growing up ... I graduated in '87 and my brother in '92 from the exact same high school ... in just those few short years things at that school (academically and politically) got significantly worse. I can't imagine sending a child there today.
     
  23. wmenorr67

    wmenorr67 Member

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    The biggest problem I see with home schooling is that if the parents don't allow the children to have a life outside the house the children will never assimilate (sp) in society. And I am not talking about becoming a sheep but being able to cope with different people and general coping skills.
     
  24. Zundfolge

    Zundfolge Member

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    wmenorr67 touches on one of the greatest myths about homeschooling.

    In the public schools (and even in private schools) children are raised in an artificial social environment where everyone is within a year of their age (often the exact same children for 12 years). The exceptionally smart and exceptionally slow students are culled from their social circles, so they are surrounded by the average and mediocre and have no chance to interact with their betters and those beneath them.

    Home schooled children tend to grow up with greater ability to relate to people who are not the same age as themselves ... in particular they tend to grow up better able to communicate with adults.

    Home schooling also tends to focus on "real world" education instead of indoctrinating children using whatever techniques happen to be the fad of the day among the academic elites.

    And don't get me started on the evils of unionized schools. :mad:

    Certainly you have the occasional nut jobs who hide their children in a compound in the mountains somewhere, but they are the exception.

    Most home schooled folk I know are affiliated with other home schoolers (some even swap kids for some subjects ... for example one parent teaches their children and the children of a couple of other families mathematics while another parent in the group teaches reading). Also home school organizations have get togethers and joint field trips together.


    School is a real weird and unnatural environment where you are segregated by age (and sometimes by academic ability as well). Its an environment where your peers are the ultimately authorities in your children's lives and where the cruelty of children is what shapes other children.
     
  25. Third_Rail

    Third_Rail Member

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    After failing grades 7, 8, 9, and 10, I dropped out of school. My average was Fs all across the board. Two months after dropping out, I took the GED - scored in the 98th percentile.


    Figure that one out; someone who fails miserably in school is smarter than 98% of graduating seniors.


    A big :neener: to all the teachers who ever told me I'd never amount to anything, as I'm going to a college next year for machining/CNC for $0.00. :D

    Scholarships are great.
     
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