Glock 36 and .45 super?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Thompsoncustom, Aug 25, 2012.

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  1. Thompsoncustom

    Thompsoncustom Member

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    Hey just wondering if anyone had experience shooting .45 super through there glock 36. I'm really just wondering if a stock 36 can handle the power of the .45 super. Thanks
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2012
  2. Thompsoncustom

    Thompsoncustom Member

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    bump
     
  3. Pete D.

    Pete D. Member

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    super

    I have loaded and shot .45 Supers from my 1911. When I do this, I change the firing pin spring and the recoil spring. I use a 32lb recoil spring.
    Can one make similar adjustments to the Glock 36 (I own and often carry a G36.)?
    The factory standard is 17 lbs for the 36. The heaviest that I have seen is 23lbs. Maybe one could have a heavier spring made. I had to call Wolff to get the 32lber for the 1911. I have also used a 28lb spring.
    If you can do something similar to the G36, then I suppose it'd be interesting to hold onto.
    Pete
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2012
  4. Thompsoncustom

    Thompsoncustom Member

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    Ya I think it would probably handle it with a 23lb spring but just shorten the life of the gun, my real concern is the increase in pressure of the super vs acp. Don't want to have a surprise hand grenade.
     
  5. Pete D.

    Pete D. Member

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    pressure

    IIRC, pressures for the Super loads are an increment above. 45 ACP+P.... about 28k psi.....you'd need to check that out. I believe it is accurate.
    And there is that unsupported case head business....though the stronger .45 Super case may take care of that. No problems in the 1911.
    Pete
     
  6. hentown

    hentown Member

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    I'm sure you could shoot .45 Supers through your G36 without blowing it up, but why would you want to? The G36 is already pretty uncomfortable with plain old +ps. Additionally, the G36 has less steel surrounding the chamber than any other Glock
     
  7. GIJOEL

    GIJOEL Member

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    The glocks don't have a fully supported chamber like the 1911, If that case let go under pressure the gas would blow down into the frame (and your hand). I wouldn't bother with the risk myself. I don't think the short barrel would net any additional power worth the wear and tear on the gun anyways.
     
  8. Thompsoncustom

    Thompsoncustom Member

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    Well i'm more just wondering if it can handle it. I have no plan on going to the range and blasting 100's of .45 super, more just enough to know that it will feed and fire them and can handle the pressure. As I don't want it to randomly explode in my face.
     
  9. hentown

    hentown Member

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    Since when did 1911s have "fully supported" chambers? None of mine do.
     
  10. Teachu2

    Teachu2 Member

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    Doesn't seem like a good idea to me. At the very least, you're subjecting the gun to increased pressure (force and wear) for little to no gain in performance. The 36 isn't known as one of the strongest Glocks to start with - why push it?
     
  11. Pete D.

    Pete D. Member

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    Hmmm

    Teach:
    Hmmm. I do not know that that statement is incorrect but I wonder, though, on what information it is based. How do you know that? As an owner of a G36, I am particularly curious.
    Pete
     
  12. hentown

    hentown Member

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    See my previous post. The G36 has less steel surrounding the round in the chamber than does any other Glock.
     
  13. Teachu2

    Teachu2 Member

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    I have met three G36 owners who had problems with the frame rails breaking. One of them is a rangemaster who still carries a G36. According to him, the failures seem to occur between 3-5000 rounds. He sells his off at 1500 and replaces with new.

    I would not shy away from a G36 based on this - but I also would not use .45 Super in it. While there are G36s out there that have held together far beyond 5k rounds, the failures that have occurred indicates caution should be used.

    I have not heard of multiple frame failures of any other Glock models, and that these failures happen after 3k rounds hints at a design issue, not a manufacturing or quality control one. Glock is aware of the issue (they replaced all three guns) and may well have implemented changes to address it in later production G36s, but I believe the G36 to be a poor basis for hot-rodding.

    Again, if I wanted a single-stack .45acp compact, I would not shy away from a G36. I would shy away from loading it hot, and absolutely would not use .45 Super in it.

    That is my opinion. YMMV
     
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