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Gold plated commemorative Winchester 94 -- to shoot or not to shoot?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by henschman, Jun 20, 2011.

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  1. henschman

    henschman Member

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    Well, I went out and bought 100 rounds of Monarch 150 grain for it. I'm shoot bossing an Appleseed this weekend, and I think I'll run some rounds through it while I'm there. We'll see how I do with those piss poor notch sights, until I can get a Williams FP for it.
     
  2. Brockak47

    Brockak47 Member

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    if grampaw didn't shoot it , why would you ? wouldnt it be nicer to keep it new and just pass it down new
     
  3. HB

    HB Member

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    Park it and shoot away! Gold is a little much for me.
     
  4. supercalvin56

    supercalvin56 Member

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    Don't shoot it! It's value is only in it's "unfired condition". If you need to shoot something go get a shooter 30-30 and shoot that. When you hand it down to your kids you will be handing them a rifle their great grandfather handled in exactly the same condition. :banghead:
     
  5. bri

    bri Member

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    What would your Grandfather have done? I'd say shoot it, cherish it and never sell it.
     
  6. jkulysses

    jkulysses Member

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    I personally wouldn't shoot it but to each their own.
     
  7. Ron James

    Ron James Member

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    Go ahead and shoot it. It will go from 1800 dollars to 600 dollars in one shot, but who cares. It's only money and who needs it. Money is the root of all evil, I've been told. Myself , if it were mine and I didn't care to keep it I would give it one of my off spring ( as it was given to you,) or sell it. But if you don't mind the monetary loss and want a pretty hunting gun that will be very difficult to sell, then have at it, A man doesn't have to use common sense all the time, he's entitled to do stupid things once in a while.
     
  8. IBEWBULL

    IBEWBULL Member

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    I have some Colt Signiture Series revolvers which I bought as investments and have not even rolled the cylinders.
    Two Winchester NRA 100 years Comm. NIB a musket and rifle. There are plenty of non-collectables which have been fired if you desire to shoot it. I would buy one which has already been fired and either ssell the NIB one or keep it as is.
    I am a grandpa and would not want to wait until I kick the bucket to have one of my kids go shoot them and negate the investment.
    I reckon i will have to indicate this in my will.
    Soon after I picked up my SSA Colt I got an Italian replica to fire to ease the anxiety of wanting to shoot it. I still havent shot my Python It has been turned but is unfired to my knowlege.
    My wife has a CCA Frontier Six Shooter 44 WCF which was a deal since it was fired. I believe half the value is gone but it is a great shooter.
    Well it is not an easy choice and I wish you well in your choice.
     
  9. henschman

    henschman Member

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    Remember, monetary value isn't an issue since I'm never going to sell it. But if I was, how many of you guys would actually pay $1800 for it?

    I don't see how it makes any sense to keep it in unfired condition just so my descendants can keep it in unfired condition too. It is a perfectly good, servicable rifle that I believe can bring me and my descendants a lot more joy by being used.

    When my grandpa gave it to me, he advised me not to shoot it because it will be worth more that way. But I am not too concerned about what my grandpa wants me to do with it -- I will do with it what I think is best for me and for future generations. And someday when I am Grandpa Hensch and I am passing it on, I want my grandchildren to know that Grandpa Hensch wouldn't have wanted them to have a rifle that they weren't able to shoot and enjoy.
     
  10. slowr1der

    slowr1der Member

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    If my Grandfather gave me a gun and had asked me not to shoot it, I couldn't imagine shooting it regardless of what it would do to the value. In this case, it's probably going to drop the value by a lot more than what you could just buy a decent used Winchester 30-30 for. That's really the route I'd go if I wanted to shoot one. If I had bought that rifle myself, I might consider shooting it, or selling it to get something I could shoot.

    However, that being said it's your rifle, and you are the only one that can choose what you'd like to do with it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2011
  11. Sheepdog1968

    Sheepdog1968 Member

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    If you have to debate this much on whether or not to shoot it, I'd be inclined to not shoot it. Get a good used Winchester for $300 and use the heck out of it.
     
  12. jkulysses

    jkulysses Member

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    It sounds like you've already made up your mind then.... ;)
     
  13. icanthitabarn

    icanthitabarn Member

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    I looked at the gun and after the comment about Grandpa's advice, I am popping popcorn :cuss:
     
  14. henschman

    henschman Member

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    Grandpa's advice about keeping the value of the rifle high was only good if I ever decide to sell it -- which is something I already made my mind up that I won't do.
     
  15. buzz yooper

    buzz yooper Member

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    Just passing by. Stopped to fill up fill up the tank and heard the conversation, thought I'd stir the pot a little.

    Some things to consider.

    1. by the time to pass this gun down to your kids, or for them to pass it down to thier kids, guns may be illegal to own, or at the very least, may be taxed out of existence.

    2. The son, grandson, or great grandson that receives this gun may not care about owning guns, or his wife may insist that he get rid of it!


    My father-in-law was an avid hunter who had about a half a dozen good solid working shotguns, Franchi, Hi-Standard, couple of Remingtons, and a nice Remington 742 rifle. None of these were "collector guns", but were nice used guns. He passed these on to his only son. Two days later his wife told him the guns could not stay in their house. Fortunately he asked me if I wanted them, and I volunteered to give them a good home.

    looking to pass a gun down more than one generation, now a days, is frought with problems and dangers. Many kids these days receive anti-gun propaganda up the ying yang from the time they are in kindergarten.

    I say enjoy the gun as you see fit. Enjoy it with your children, and hopefully they will then pass it down to their heirs as not only something of monetary value, but also as a memento and memory of good times had while shooting the gun with dad and grandad.
     
  16. christcorp

    christcorp Member

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    I sometimes spend money on things others might think are silly. I spent $15,000 on a painting. It's an original, and I really enjoy simply looking at it. However, I don't buy firearms simply to look at them. I don't buy cars simply to look at that. If you're even going to consider the VALUE of such a gun; e.g. fired vs unfired, commemorative, etc... Then you also must then consider SELLING IT. What good is the value of something if you don't plan on selling it? What good is passing it down through generations if they aren't going to sell it? So, if you're not going to ever sell it, then what would you do with it? Look at it??? The only other option is to shoot it.

    Now; if I had such a rifle, I'd sell it. However, being it was passed down by a grandfather and it has sentimental value, USE that sentimental value. Take it out on the FIRST DAY of hunting season each year. If you don't get you deer or whatever on that first day, put it away and grab your other rifle. Make the rifle HAVE MEANING!!! Pass the rifle and the tradition down to your children. Have the child you pass it on to continue the tradition by hunting with it on opening day. Make your grandfather's memory part of the hunt.

    To put the gun in a cabinet or safe is a total waste. UNLESS YOU'RE WILLING TO SELL IT. As mentioned, you can't display it. It could be stolen. You don't have to make it your primary weapon to hunt with. No scope, no accessories, no modifications. Simply shoot 3-4 rounds to sight it in, then take it for opening day of hunting season each year. THAT will keep your grandfather's memory alive. Not keeping the thing in a safe where you can go Oooooo, Ahhhhhhh. What the hell is that.
     
  17. gotigers

    gotigers Member

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    Shoot it a little, clean it, stow...repeat. I wouldn't abuse it, but i wouldn't let it be a safe queen.
     
  18. BrocLuno

    BrocLuno Member

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    I'd call this a "pic-nic" gun. That is, one that you can bring out while the chicken is on the grill and share around with the kids and the grand kids. They'll be in awe. It's the special family "magic" gun that you teach the youngsters the right way to do things. Then clean it, wrap it back up and put it away until next year so the stories can grow :)

    If it shoots well and you can get a sample target with 5 under and 1 1/2", that'll add to the value more than a gold plater that's an unknown. It might not be a hunter due to the bling factor? But, it's not like it was built by the factory for Teddy R or anything. Play with it and have fun, then pass it down with all the pomp and ceremony you can muster :)
     
  19. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

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    Winchester made a truckload of commemorative guns in the 1960's and 1970's. Some of these were some very desireable configurations with nice wood, upgraded finishes and otherwise uncommon chamberings. Most can be had for anywhere between $400 and $1000. They make great shooters and IMHO, will really never be worth much on the collector market. So you're not losing much to shoot one.

    These are a little different. They're relatively expensive guns that will be hugely devalued if you shoot them. They cost more but are to me, worth less. With all due respect to grandpa, a gold plated rifle of questionable taste that he bought and stuck in a closet somewhere is not an heirloom. The old Colt or S&W he carried, shot, bled and sweated on is an heirloom of immeasurable value. The rifle he hunted with for 50yrs and trusted to supply his family with fresh meat is an heirloom. Not a gold-plated safe queen. So my suggestion would be to sell it and buy something you can actually use. Heirlooms are made, not simply bought.
     
  20. buzz yooper

    buzz yooper Member

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    As others have posted, if you don't ever plan on selling this rifle, than what's the harm in shooting it?

    If your plan is for this rifle to be passed on to your heirs and for them not to sell it, than what's the harm in shooting it?

    If your plan is to pass this on to your heirs as and asset and not a family heirloom, something that they will sell, than that is a different animal.

    The more valuable it is, the more likely they might be to sell it, taking it out of the family heirloom class.

    All that being said, if, say 50 years down the road your great grandson has no interest in guns, and sells the thing, do you really care if he got $500 for it because it is a nice used gun or $900 because nobody shot it. I mean, the guy's dumping a family heirloom that you took special care of.

    Now, if, 50 years down the road, your great grandson has an interest in guns, would'nt you be happier if he was using this rifle to teach his son how to shoot and nurture and interest in shooting for your great great grandson?

    Take care of it, but shoot the darn thing. Heck, the government could confiscate all of our guns in 50 years, would you rather that they confiscated a mint condition rifle that you denied yourself the pleasure of shooting, and they wind up chopping it up?
     
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