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GPS ?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by ZeroJunk, Aug 5, 2011.

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  1. ZeroJunk

    ZeroJunk Member

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    I need advice on a GPS for hunting. I don't need road maps or any of that. Just something that I can punch in my coordinates, track where I walk, and how to get back. Inexpensive is good. What do I need? Thanks
     
  2. avs11054

    avs11054 Member

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    I'm not sure this will help, but I took the plunge on an Garmin Oregon 450 and got the Arizona and NM map pack. The GPS was $350 and the map pack was another $100. It is an amazing device. It does what you asked and much more.

    This was the first GPS device I have ever bought, so I cannot help you on other models as I have no experience with them.
     
  3. NMBrian

    NMBrian Member

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  4. Cranky CJ

    Cranky CJ Member

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    look up garmin's site and see what they have to offer. I got a garmin etrex legend HCx off craigslist last fall for hunting. cheap like $80 for everything I'll ever need. has all the maps (which are nice), you can mark points, track your route etc. mark the vehicle when you start walking, just start walking, the gps tracks your route and follow it back. these things are amazing. the accessories are cool as well. i have an attachment clip to attach it to the handle bars of my bicycle, atv etc to track where i go. when you go scout you can mark the point where you think you want to hunt. when hunting season comes along you navigate to that point etc. well worth the money.
     
  5. countertop

    countertop Member

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    I have a Garmin 60CSx and love it. Have used it for a few years to map everything. I've tried a bunch of others out, but nothing is as accurate or works as well in deep heavy woods. The etrex legend I used to have, which I had used successfully out west hiking in the mountains, was utterly worthless in the thick woods along the east coast because it needed a clear sky to catch a signal. Not sure if the newer models have improved.
     
  6. Robert

    Robert Administrator Staff Member

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    I second the 60 CSx, or the newer one in that line. They are great, easy to use GPS units.

    Give some thought to at least having a good map of the area just in case.
     
  7. exbiologist

    exbiologist Member

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    Some of those GPSes you guys are suggesting are way more than he needs. Just go with the basic eTrex. No flies on that model, and can still do way more than you are likely to need.
     
  8. CoRoMo

    CoRoMo Member

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    All I want is what I'm quoting here. Just something to help me keep the game trails that I hunt "organized". I've been contemplating a GPS for a few years now. I don't see too much of a point to any map feature because I hunt miles from the nearest road and I get well off the foot paths. I try and memorize game trails, creeks, clearings, drainages, and other landmarks. But some of those game trails look identical and I don't really know how far apart they are from each other. I'd love a GPS that would draw all those trails for me as I hike them, that way I could name them, calculate distances and better know my hunting spots.
     
  9. ZeroJunk

    ZeroJunk Member

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    I hunt in the Rockys, Bob Marshall in particular. We may ride horses for a couple of hours out of camp. Usually up on top beacuse that's where the elk are. Sometimes I hunt my way back to camp on foot in a more or less straight line whereas the horse trails switch back. It's hard to get lost lost in the mountains because the peaks and valleys give you a good general idea. But, I have gotten in places where the drainages are such that you can end up on the next creek over. It can make you walk a few extra miles.

    Thanks for the info guys.
     
  10. Old krow

    Old krow Member

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    The Garmin eTrek will probably work for most things. The eTrek 20 has expandable memory. That comes in pretty handy if you're mapping trails. The price on the Garmin 20 is about $172 as listed on a couple of the marine sights. You should be able to find the standard model for around $100 or so.
     
  11. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    I have used this one for many years and hundreds of hunts. It has yet to let me down. Battery life is phenomenal also.


    Hunting GPS
     
  12. ZeroJunk

    ZeroJunk Member

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    Actually, I have compasses, but never found that they told me anything I didn't already know.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2011
  13. azwizard

    azwizard Member

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    Garmin GPS-12

    Check Craigs list or ebayand see if you can find an old garmin GPS-12 unit. It tells you where you are, no maps, track back and route funtions, enter waypoints and locations. Exactly what you have described. Followed it back to the truck/downed game/boat landing/fishing hole etc... I've used that one since it was released and it's never let me down.

    People have asked me why don't I get the newer one and so far they haven't been able to show me anything that thiers can do that mine can't. I have Road type navigation on my cell phone so why duplicate that again for the GPS with map function. On land or water it's worked well for me. Water is a little more difficult but once you've been there and created a route, all you have to do is follow it.

    For accuracy the most it's ever been off was about 60 feet, it's usually within 3 feet.

    Here's one listed as still new in the box, http://www.ebay.com/ctg/Garmin-GPS-...A3%7C39%3A1%7C72%3A5436&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14#

    Good luck.
     
  14. Double Naught Spy

    Double Naught Spy Sus Venator

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    Ah, but some have fairly well done topographic maps in them that will provide you with information on the hills, valleys, creeks, and other water sources that may be beneficial to your hunting.
     
  15. lizziedog1

    lizziedog1 Member

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    I am a Garmin e-trek user. I have no sense of direction. I mow my lawn because if it got too long I would lose my way back to the house.

    What is surprising is how easy it is to get lost in the desert. People will park their trucks and go for a short walk thinking that there is no way to lose sight of it. They come to a scary realization when they can't find their truck.

    Actually, since I have been using a GPS, my sense of direction sems to be improving.
     
  16. CoRoMo

    CoRoMo Member

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    I agree. Not necessary, but a good option and useful feature.
     
  17. czarjl

    czarjl Member

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    I have an original (at least 10 years old) Garmin eTrek Legend. I use it all the time for hunting in wood that i'm not completely familial with. I does everything I need and probably more.

    Look for one that suites your need and price. My Garmin has never let me down... but I always take a compass... they are small and can at least give you some idea of direction if lost.
     
  18. Mr_Mij

    Mr_Mij Member

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    Another vote for the Garmin 60CSx if you can find one used. It has more features than you need now, but you can add road maps to it too down the road if you like. I think it was one of the first handhelds to have the high sensitivity chip in it. Anyhow, mine has survived several tumbles and has gotten wet a few times and never stuttered. I still use it when I'm traveling for work. I was also quite happy with my first GPS, a Garmin eTrex Legend C. While you don't have to spend over $500, don't skimp either.
     
  19. Frozen North

    Frozen North Member

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    Another vote for the garmin 60csx....

    I started with a non mapping GPS 72. It was cheap, worked for what I needed it for, and brought be back to the same ice holes (I used it for ice fishing on a 100,000+acre lake) every time. Yes, it worked, but I saw others using mapping units with much more ease. I finally took the leap and bought the 60csx with a topo chip and a lakemaster chip. I am sooooooo glad I did!! It was like a whole new world opened up to me!!!

    You don't need a 60csx, any gps will leave bread crumbs and mark spots. I highly suggest you skip the first purchase and move right on to a good unit and save yourself the money though.

    If anything, stick with Garmin. Their units are superb and their online support is unmatched.
     
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