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Gun laws of Ecuador?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Greywolf, May 21, 2006.

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  1. Greywolf

    Greywolf Member

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    Anyone have a link or any info on what the gun laws in Ecuador are like, especially for a retired American living there?
     
  2. Greywolf

    Greywolf Member

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    Aha - found some interesting info:

    Weapons in Ecuador

    Gun laws in Ecuador are standardized and flexible. For example, there is no distinction between owning and carrying a gun. When somebody acquires a gun, the buyer must wait until the military authorities give the specific permit to possess it before the seller provides the weapon. This process generally requires one month.

    The maximum caliber permitted for common citizens and private security companies is 9mm (for semiautomatic pistols) with two magazines of 10 bullets each and Caliber 38 Special for revolvers. Certain exceptions apply to sport shooters, which can use a maximum caliber of 0.40 S&W for a semi-automatic pistol.

    You can get permits to carry more magazines if the need is justified. Weapons such as sub-machine guns in 9mm could be authorized upon military study and the endorsement of a private certified consultant.

    Assault rifles and carbines are completely prohibited and possessing one is a serious crime. Laser sights and night vision systems are prohibited as well.

    For a foreigner to carry weapons in Ecuador a valid working permit is needed; no special restrictions apply.


    Interesting. So other than not being able to own an "assault weapon", I could have my Glock 26 and 10 round mags, and could carry. And I could possibly even own a SMG. Rifles I assume are no problem as long as they aren't semi-autos. Though I wonder if they would consider a 10/22 to be OK? And I wonder what their laws are regarding suppressors?
     
  3. mountainclmbr

    mountainclmbr Member

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    Interesting information. I have been mountain climbing in Ecuador and found it to be a fascinating country. I had no idea a foreigner could own a gun though. I wonder what the approval rate is for US citizens and how difficult it is to get a work permit.
     
  4. 1 old 0311

    1 old 0311 member

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    Also check out Costa Rica.

    Kevin
     
  5. Greywolf

    Greywolf Member

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    Have been to Costa Rica and it was the place where we first considered retiring. They have similar gun laws as well. But Costa Rica is beginning to get costly.
     
  6. Mannlicher

    Mannlicher Member

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    call their embassy. Probably will get more accurate info than asking here.
     
  7. MatthewVanitas

    MatthewVanitas Member

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    Hmmm... With Costa Rica rising doing better and better, and attracting more retirees and expats, I wonder if Nicaragua or Honduras will take notice and start trying to follow.

    Combine this increasing GDP with the cultural influx, and take note of the potential rising tides of Libertariansim (which is just starting to take hold in CR, so I'm told), and things could start getting very interesting in Central America.

    A Costa Rica with minimal gun control, minimal drug laws, and a general love of the free market could make a great test-case.

    -MV
     
  8. Greywolf

    Greywolf Member

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    Very true, Matt. If you haven't visited CR, plan to do so sometime in the near future. We loved every moment we were there.
     
  9. real_name

    real_name member

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    Costa Rica is expensive, I went to Nicaragua in '03 instead and loved it.
    I have no idea what the laws are there but the dollar goes a long way. The expatriate retiree community is in it's infancy and mainly centered around Grenada and the Corn Islands.
    Argentina is also very affordable, especially real estate.
     
  10. LaEscopeta

    LaEscopeta Member

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    I was in Quito (capital of Ecuador and second biggest city) for 3 weeks about 3 years ago. I stayed in a middle/upper class residential neighborhood south of the finical district. A few observations:

    1. Every house in the better parts of the city had a wall around it, most with broken glass set in mortar along the top of the wall (typical 3rd world barbed wire.)
    2. Every bank had several armed guards, at least one with a sub gun or shotgun
    3. Some super markets had armed guards.
    4. Some big houses had watchmen, some armed.
    5. I did not feel unsafe walking the street during the day, in the better neighborhoods and biz districts. I did not go out at night.
    6. We drove past a lot of teeming slums areas in Quito; we were told these were unsafe for anyone not from the neighborhood, especially foreigners.
    7. Coups, particularly by the military, seem to be the national past time. I guessing that is why government limits the power and ammo capacity of firearms the public can have.
    8. I did not see or hear of any crime while I was there. Nor did I see a lot of police.

    I don’t have any first hand experience about the county more than 50 miles or so from the capital.

    I’m not saying Quito is unsafe, or even if it has a higher crime rate than the US. I am saying there is some crime, and like anyplace, an ex-pat retiree moving there should assess the situation and see how the locals manage it. Then they can arrange for their own safety in the way that works for them.
     
  11. HankB

    HankB Member

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    On the surface, the gun laws don't look particularly awful for a banana republic, but I'm wondering . . . how are they applied in practice?

    Is the military permit process "shall issue" where you automatically get it after a month, or is it "may issue" (as in places like NYC and LA) where the local commandante will issue it to politicians and people who bribe him, but nobody else?
     
  12. Mumbles_45

    Mumbles_45 Member

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    I lived in Honduras for a while, first in Tegucigalpa and then for the last couple years in San Pedro, and the above is very true there too, actually the most common guns for bank guards I remember seeing were M-16s and FALs, not shotguns and subguns. I vaguely remember my dad looking into getting a pistol when we first moved there but he never did so either he was denied or he gave up, I dont know. I did know a few American families that owned handguns there, but dont know any of the details on the laws. I do remember that there was a big gun control craze not too long before I moved back to the US. I dont know any of the details other than it resulted in my Church's night watchman being reduced from an AK (dont know what kind) to a Star Model B.
     
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