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Gun safes.

Discussion in 'Shooting Gear and Storage' started by Miguel Hernandez, Feb 17, 2019.

  1. If1HitU

    If1HitU Member

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    Nice link thanks for sharing it.
     
  2. Miguel Hernandez

    Miguel Hernandez Member

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    Thanks for the comment so far. The idea of having the 64 gun safe would be nice but size really is a big factor for me max I can probably do is 25 storage gun safe vertical height is less of a factor so a 7 ft or 6 ft safe seems fine with me. It probably would have to fit in a normal size front door since thst the moment the garage is blocked with carp but I am trying to get junk out. And in terms of cost I realistically all in can do $2k (problems of being a student in college). I really also don't mind used safes just want something that will probably last pretty much forever and good quality. I heard deals could be had for a used safe. I am in the NJ about 45 mins from NYC and 45 mins to PA. Really still just doing research and taking the best information I can get but I do plan to have something in a few months no later. Thanks again.
     
  3. toiville2feathers

    toiville2feathers Member

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  4. toiville2feathers

    toiville2feathers Member

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    I have looked at a lot of gun safes the last couple years. Like a lot of you there is factors such as how many dollars you can really spend. The logistics of moving it to where you want it. Can you get the unit you want into your house. Choosing a safe is a chore.
    I have found that for the most part, most of the safe manufactures are pretty equal in what they offer. They use the same thickness of metal n the side walls and top and bottom. The doors are similar also. Pay attention to the crossbills and how they are located and mounted & anchored.
    The very best safe that I have seen is a Reed safe. It used 1/2 inch steel for the walls and door, It is fire rated for 1250 degrees for 90 minutes. It has slide out gun racks that makes for easy , safe removal of the gun from storage.
    It is expensive, it’s more than I can afford. But it wroth it if you have a collection of high quality fire arms.
    The company is located in Warroad MN . Google up Reeds Safes and take a look at them. You will like what you see.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2019
  5. DoubleMag

    DoubleMag Member

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  6. 78tsubaki

    78tsubaki Member

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    Bigger than you think you need but measure out your travel path through your house and ensure that what you buy will fit. Removal of doors and molding might be necessary. Don't get your helper trapped in the hallway.

    Crib underneath your floor if necessary.

    Sturdy uses industrial fire resistant wool for insulation. Side benefit is the wool does not wick moisture like some concrete and drywall products. You will still want a dehumidifier.

    I found that with a little planning you can put a small fireproof safe inside of your RSC. This doubles the piece of mind.

    Good luck.
     
  7. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    First off, condolences on your loss.
    Well, that's just it, that fire protection is based on being in a city with fast-responding fire fighters. House fire in that situation can stay as low as 800,º lowere on outside walls. What it won't do so very much is deal with a wildfire which will run 1500-1600º with wind-driven updrafts fueling the heat.

    Also, IIRC, that cannon relies on a lot of gypsum sheet goods for fire protection. Gypsum is pretty good for this. About 350º it starts boiling all of its trapped moisture out as protective steam. Good for your house, less good for critical papers in your safe.

    True fire protection is tough to come by in wildfire country.
     
    theotherwaldo likes this.
  8. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    LoL. Not EMP, just been to enough DefCons and watching the lockpickers and PenTesters work. Back about DefCon19 there was a panel on the design failings too many safe makers are guilty of. Particularly some of the smaller document & nightstand safes (some of which can be defeated by just dropping them). But, there's a PRC-made electronic lock that has a bypass which is "pressable" using a paperclip.
     
  9. FAS1

    FAS1 Member

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    You might spend a little more than you want, but Sturdy Safe will build pretty much to your specs.

    http://www.sturdysafe.com/products/custom-gun-safe
     
  10. labnoti

    labnoti Member

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    You received a lot of recommendations to buy big capacity, but those safes are very difficult to move. Since I bought a "security cabinet" about six months ago, I've already moved it to a different room. Moving a larger safe up or down stairs, or to a new house is not a trivial task. Instead of buying big, consider buying quantity.

    FWIW, I declined the gypsum drywall-lined RSC's and just went with a Stack-On cabinet. It's just a 14 ga sheet metal cabinet with welded seams (spot welded). It has a 3-point latch and a piano hinge on the door. It was $129 for an "18 gun" cabinet, and I could buy a half-dozen of them for the same money as an entry-level Liberty with better pry-resistance, but the same thickness steel that easily zips open with a battery-powered tool. The drywall-lined RSC's give the illusion of being more solid and secure because the drywall stiffens the thin sheet steel.

    Right now I only need one cabinet, but I would rather have several of these than a larger, heavier RSC that I could never move by myself.

    I believe the RSC's do offer substantially more security, but only when you pay for it. An 11 gauge steel RSC with 15 locking bars and a "90 minute" fire rating is slightly more secure, but will cost well over $2000. A 7 gauge steel RSC with a 2.5 hour fire rating is where you can really start to be confident that your assets are more secure than a 14 ga sheet metal cabinet, but it will set you back nearly $5000. If I had an RSC that costly and it was damaged, I'd lose more on the RSC than I would on the contents. But some people have a lot more than $5000 in guns. For them, I recommend insurance. If I was underwriting gun insurance, I wouldn't offer a discount unless the guns were stored in a real TL-30 rated safe.
     
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