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Handgun Economic Fodder

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by SharpsDressedMan, Mar 4, 2012.

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  1. SharpsDressedMan

    SharpsDressedMan member

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    Pondering the accumulation of handguns for barter in tough economic and disrupted social times. Ammo is also good, and can be traded for other things needed, should a severe economic or other disaster occur, but what about guns as a place to put your savings? What if you couldn't get your money out of a bank or other investment, and such just wasn't getting you enough "interest" to bother with it? Would handguns be a good comodity to invest in? I'm thinking about snatching up used Glocks, one at a time, to stock away, along with other items that could be traded or bartered for...whatever......
     
  2. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

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    my $.02?.....as good as gold? not quite. Darn certain that it is better than dollars on interest though.
     
  3. bbuddtec

    bbuddtec Member

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    I wouldn't blame you, it sure is a commodity already :D
     
  4. dogtown tom

    dogtown tom Member

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    When guns become the most valuable commodity....you sure as heck aren't going to be trading them to anyone. While I'll gladly arm friends and loved ones I'm not arming strangers....no matter how much gold or beer they have.


    Gunless: Uh.....I'll trade you five loaves of bread, two gold coins, an orange and three cans of beans for one of your Glocks.

    Gunrich: Uh....I'll take all that plus your boots, that watch and your tactical wheelbarrow.....That's why I'm gonna let you go. I'm gonna give you to the count of three to get your lousy, lyin', low-down, four flushing carcass OUT my door! 1... 2...Merry Christmas, you filthy animal....:evil:
     
  5. iblong

    iblong Member

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    I think its not a bad idea at all,and infact have started doing that to some degree.I use to be pretty carefull about my fire arms purchases and my budget,Not so much anymore.At the rate our economy is going money in the bank may not be worth much.I have watched my retirement drop and drop and drop since 911 and the crash,Ive cut back on the money I put in.
    I have cut out most activities that cost me money.With the exceptions of the shooting sports.I buy fire arms when a deal comes along,But I buy the ones I can turn quick if I need cash,Im not talking collectables but things like Glocks,S&W,CZ ect.I reload ammo for every thing I shoot an buy component in bulk.I enjoy them while I can and will part with them as needed.
    Worst case senairial my Kids will be well set up when I pass.
    Bob.
     
  6. seikdel

    seikdel Member

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    I work with a doctor who's a class 3 dealer. When I asked him about how often he goes shooting, he told me, "I don't really like shooting. The reason I'm a dealer is because guns are the only thing going up faster than gold right now. It's my retirement plan."
     
  7. mes227

    mes227 Member

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    It depends on the nature of the collapse. In a minor economic upheaval you're probably right. Though over the past 100 years guns have been a better investment than gold, and gold is not out performing most other commodities, it's just better known. And the problem with gold is when the economy recovers gold price collapses (remember it rocketing to $800 then collapsing to as low as $258? The current average cost of production for US gold mines is $550 an ounce. There's no good reason for the long-term price to be 3 or 4 times costs -- the laws of supply and demand dictate otherwise and the mining industry itself is doing long-range planning on prices in the $1,200 range.

    In the event of a general global collapse, which we got very close to recently, there's no good reason to think gold would hold it's value. It has no real uses in that 'economy' and the value is entirely fiat - that is, by agreement or perception, and when that perception changes so does the value. Guns and ammo, on the other hand, have value apart from perception. Food (and perhaps medicine) will be the most valuable, but food is bulky and doesn't store as well as firearms and ammunition. A well armed family is simply going to do better in a collapse than otherwise and that gives these value beyond gold.

    If I were planning on the general collapse scenario and had to pick one metal to 'invest' in, it would be lead!
     
  8. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

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    Now there's an idea!! I fully expect the EPA to ban lead some day.
     
  9. jackpinesavages

    jackpinesavages member

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    Absolutely. I'm watching some auctions now. As we get closer to this Mayan/apocalypse/Bilderberg finale, basic items such as handguns and water filtration systems will skyrocket.
     
  10. jim243

    jim243 Member

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    I would consider trading ammo for food and water, but not firearms. I just don't think it would be wise.

    Now as to guns as an investment, the more well known brands will hold their value and increase in worth than the lower end ones. But it's worth will be subject to availability of ammo for it.

    Jim
     
  11. hogshead

    hogshead Member

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    I think that guns are defintely a good investment , and I am doing the same thing . Although I am leaning more to 22lr rifles and pistols and ammo. I think if the economy does tank you would be better off with cheap guns to trade since most people wont have much to trade anyways.
     
  12. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    Robbery is not nice.
     
  13. mes227

    mes227 Member

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    Every successful society has traded weapons with its allies (and often even with its enemies). Some of the most powerful became so through exactly this. Yes, you need to do so carefully but it's the wise and prepared who will be most successful.
     
  14. pockets

    pockets Member

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    Drat! I missed that episode of 'Doomsday Preppers'.

    Although, I'd opt for silver over gold. Silver can be used on both werewolves and vampires.

    .
     
  15. 19-3Ben

    19-3Ben Member

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    Why focus on handguns?

    A Mosin Nagant can be had for $80, will already be covered in enough cosmo that you don't have to do anything to preserve it, and would likely be as valuable as a handgun (if not even more so) in some kind of collapse. I feel like with a much much lower investment, there is probably going to be a similar return.
    It's also very easy to stock up on ammo which would make for good trade-fodder. Of course a non-standard caliber will detract from value later on, and this must be taken into account.

    I'm kind of impressed so far that people seem to be sticking to the economics of the situation rather than bogging this down into SHTF subject matter and getting the thread locked.
     
  16. SigMic

    SigMic Member

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    Best off to go with a bigger caliber. Otherwise you're going to have to roll the bills real tight.
     
  17. 19-3Ben

    19-3Ben Member

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    Yeah well, with my savings right now, I could probably get away with .17hmr.:eek:
     
  18. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

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    Since I'm gonna be trading my corn for all yer wimmin.....I'm gonna need a good supply of lead to defend the corn that I keep to feed the wimmin....so I can rent the.......

    ...this is getting complicated.
     
  19. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    ^
    I hear you. They don't tax corn liquor and tobacco for nothin'.. people want/need it.
     
  20. PabloJ

    PabloJ Member

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    If the other side closes person to person w/in state loophole you investments will "go up in smoke" or is it "down the drain"? I prefer to put my $ into collectable coins.
     
  21. Andrew Wyatt

    Andrew Wyatt Member

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    My daddy taught me two things.

    1. Never sell a gun.

    2. Never turn down free food.
     
  22. SharpsDressedMan

    SharpsDressedMan member

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    "If the other side closes person to person w/in state loophole you investments will "go up in smoke" or is it "down the drain"? I prefer to put my $ into collectable coins."

    In a full blown depression, complete with rises in violent crimes, etc, do you really think any BS gun laws are going to be obeyed, or BE ABLE TO BE ENFORCED?
     
  23. Canfield

    Canfield Member

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    I'm an economics professor. I recommend you buy guns because you enjoy them or you have some use for them, not as an investment.

    You'll want to be prepared in the event of a disaster; however, if one strikes, it's not likely that you'll waste time either lamenting the money you lost in your 401k or scheming to become the richest refugee on the block.
     
  24. 19-3Ben

    19-3Ben Member

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    I don't think this is about being a "rich refugee." I think this is about having good trade fodder so that you can trade a gun to someone in exchange for items that might help you survive (ie. food, water filtration, fire starting supplies, blankets/clothing, shelter, etc...).
    You're the expert here, but I assume that once currency becomes worthless we'll be back to the ye' olde barter of goods system pretty soon!
     
  25. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

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    If you have guns and ammo, you can have all the food/supplies you want.
     
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