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Handgun Suppressors

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by Nightcrawler, Sep 8, 2003.

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  1. Nightcrawler

    Nightcrawler Member

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    When were suppressors for pistols originally developed? I'm thinking sometime in the .30s.

    The Allies used a suppressed High-Standard .22 pistol during the War, didn't they?

    I've heard somewhere that early suppressors were so heavy that they prevented recoil-operated handguns from cycling properly. Is this true?

    I know other suppressed weapons during the Second World War include the De Lisle carbine and the integrally suppressed STEN, but what about pistols?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Dave Markowitz

    Dave Markowitz Member

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    I think eEither the 20s or 30s, but I'm not sure.

    Yup.

    I believe this was true in some cases. The High Standard wasn't affected by this, though, since it was blowback.

    The Brits came up with the Welrod and something called the "Hand Firing Device," IIRC. The Welrod was made in .32 ACP and 9mm. It was manually operated. I found a page on the Welrod at http://www.kitsune.addr.com/Firearms/Single-Shot-Pistols/Welrod.htm.

    Aside from handguns, the Allies came up the the Mk.IIS and Mk.VS silenced STEN guns, the M3 SMG was fitted with a suppressor, and the M1 Carbine was also fitted with one on at least an experimental basis.
     
  3. C.R.Sam

    C.R.Sam Moderator Emeritus

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    In 1899 a patent was granted to J. Borrensen and S. Sigbjornsen for "lessening the sound of discharge."
    I think Maxim's first patent was issued shortly after that , but havent yet found the patent.
    Also, in this same time frame Greener was marketing one.

    They been around for a while.

    Sam
     
  4. Fed168

    Fed168 Member

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    The NRA museum has a Maxim suppressor on display.
     
  5. SelfProclaimedExpert

    SelfProclaimedExpert member

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    This is still true, especially of guns with tilting barrels. While some companies just attempt to make super lightweight suppressors that may work on this type, most serious suppressors for Browning type pistols employ a Nielson Device, or recoil booster. And the problem isn't just weight; the gas hitting the baffles is fighting the barrel's tendancy to recoil.

    This device is a spring loaded first stage that can expand backward, out of the suppessor body toward the gun. This is also the part attached to the barrel. In essense, the device uses first stage gas pressure to drive itself at the gun like a piston. That movement forces the barrel aft, as if recoil had pushed it. Really, recoil and the booster are doing the same thing, producing enough momentum to cycle the action.

    For military uses, the High-Standard had a long record, but I believe Ruger MkIIs also saw a fair amount of Cold War use, or at least issue. For the military, the current standard is the Socom pistol with a recoil boosting suppresor. Prior to that, the Navy Seals employed a S&W 39 with a slide lock (manual cycled), then the fixed barrel P9S or PPK. Some Air Force units were rumored to have bought extended barrels and lightweight suppressors for the M9s issued to combat pilots, but I've never seen evidense of the this.
     
  6. 444

    444 Member

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    About a year ago, The Small Arms Review published it's annual suppressor issue. They had an article about a suppressed handgun that was actually built and sold by H.P. Maxim close to 100 years ago. It was sold to a slaughter house for use dispatching cattle prior to processing. The slaughter house is still owned by the same family and is still in buisness. And, the suppressed handgun is still used to this day. It has fired hundreds of thousands of rounds. They borrowed this set-up and tested it against the best stuff made today. It was very respectable, just as good as many suppressors today and just slightly behind the best suppressors we can buy today.
    The suppressor was about the same size and shape as what you would order new, today.
     
  7. C.R.Sam

    C.R.Sam Moderator Emeritus

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    Greener, the Brit shotgun folks, also had a cattle dispatcher handgun at the turn of the century. The business end had a device so shaped that, when held against the victom, gave a high probablility of proper shot placement for quick drop. In the Greener gun, it looks like the silencing was of secondary import and primary was proper shot angle and location.

    Maxim didn't get there first but he got it right enough to last for a century. On guns, cars and many other applications where sound attenuation is desired.
    And: Hiram Percy Maxim was holder of the first ARRL (Ham Radio) license. A man of many talants.

    Sam
     
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