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Handguns with shoulder stocks

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by natedog, Sep 24, 2004.

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  1. natedog

    natedog Member

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  2. buttrap

    buttrap Member

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    if the stock is a ww-2 issue stock to fit the gun its legal. if its a new repro stock its not legal. PS.. I really dont think anyone would be able to or could tell the differance unless you had the gun in the FBI lab after you stuck a bank up with it and then a non matching stock would be the least of your court issues.
     
  3. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    Stocked Pistoles

    A range bud is a collector of military pistols with shoulder stocks.
    I try to coincide my trips to the range when it's his day...The first Friday in every month. Plinkin' at steel ringers at 100 yards with a stocked Artillery Luger and a Broomhandle Mauser is just way too cool...:cool:
     
  4. Hkmp5sd

    Hkmp5sd Member

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    Wanna see just how screwed up ATF is?

    Yes, specific C&R handguns with original or replica shoulder stocks are not considered NFA weapons.
    Of course, they can't be consistent.
     
  5. DougCxx

    DougCxx Member

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    Semi-related: the Beeman airgun company used to import a Hermann-Weirach air pistol, the P-1 (sold in Europe as the Hermann Weirauch HW-45). The P-1 used a grip that was modeled heavily after the Colt Gov't 45. One of the accessories available for the pistol was a non-attaching shoulder stock.

    At the time (late 80's-early 90's, when I saw it), the Beeman (USA) catalog said that this stock was also legal to use for firearm pistols--because it did not actually attach directly to the gun. The stock had a recess that fit the butt of the pistol, but was only held into the stock by your shooting-hand thumb.
    ~
     
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