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Have you read Greg Ellifritz and if so what do you think?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by OldTman, May 28, 2012.

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  1. OldTman

    OldTman Member

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    Not sure sure if this is the proper forum for this ut if not the mods can rap me sharply on the knuckles and put it where it belongs.
    I first saw Mr. Ellifritz's article on stopping power about six months ago. After reading it I was pretty impressed with the man and shocked at what his stats showed. First of all he took the position of doing a lot, a whole lot, of research himself. What an effort. His findings made me sit up and take notice and made me wonder about stopping power. I think he has a lot of good points. If you're not familiar with what I'm talking about read this: http://www.buckeyefirearms.org/node/7866
     
  2. OldTman

    OldTman Member

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    I'm truly shocked. 108 reviews and not one opinion.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2012
  3. Drail

    Drail Member

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    I think you'll find that on this forum not many folks believe in "stopping power".:rolleyes:
     
  4. Skribs

    Skribs Member

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    This was actually discussed in another thread last week. Basic conclusions were:

    -The sample size on some of these is very small.
    -Lumping certain things together (i.e. ".22 caliber" could mean anything from .22 short to .22 WMR, and possibly 5.7x28mm, ".32 caliber" could mean .327 federal or .32 ACP).
    -Some of his stats weren't right, i.e. "number of 1-shot stops" isn't actually 1-shot stops, but shots/stops.
    -Psychological and physiological stops were lumped together
    -Deaths could have occured later and not been part of the stop
    -Bullet design wasn't a factor he considered

    There were some more things specific to this study, but as with any post-shooting mass analysis, there are too many variables to discuss.

    My conclusion is that we won't truly have an accurate study on how bullet design affects physiological stops until we do extensive computer analysis with high-end physics modeling.
     
  5. Frank Ettin

    Frank Ettin Moderator

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