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HBO's The Pacific

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by 61chalk, Mar 25, 2010.

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  1. DAdams

    DAdams Member

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    My Dad (Navy Radio Operator) was in the Pacific....

    He has pictures he took with stringers of dried ears.
     
  2. Va Shooter

    Va Shooter Member

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    No Pics only stories:
    Lost 1 Great -Uncle in Philippines, never heard from again
    2nd Great -Uncle 7 tours on sub in Pacific (killed after war in train accident)
    Both Grandfathers (civilian coast watchers on Outer Banks of North Carolina with shotguns looking for Nazi Subs:eek:

    I'm enjoying all these pics/stories. "ThE PACIFIC" IS VERY WELL DONE, I'll keep comments about Tom Hanks for another thread, sad.
     
  3. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    My father (1919-1994) fought and was wounded on Peleliu. He did not talk about it much unless pressed for specifics. I do recall that he said his favorite weapon was the BAR. He also brought home a Japanese officer's sword, which unfortunately got lost in a move.
     
  4. Moose23

    Moose23 Member

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    Grandaddy died in Jan 1991. He never told us grandkids anything about the war. He was a 1st Sgt USMC, spent some time attached to Greg "Pappy" Boyington's squadron as a Corsair mechanic, fought at Guadalcanal.
    Found a lot out when one of my aunts put together a family history. Family lore has it that he volunteered for the Marines so he wouldn't get drafted into the Army.
     
  5. Taniwha

    Taniwha Member

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    Sydney, Australia
    The Great Escape

    Can`t wait for The Pacific to come to Australia. 2 months to go.
    It`s not the Pacific or even Band Of Brothers, But an even earlier Movie.

    My Granddads 1st Cousin, (The man I was named for,) Flying Officer Porokoru Patapu (John) Pohe was the first Maori pilot of the RAF, He was the first Maori Instructor in the RAF, He was the first Maori to fly over Germany and he was the first Maori to fly the 4 engined Halifax Bomber. He was born in Wanganui, raised in Taihape, and flew 22 missions over Germany before his reputation as "Lucky Johnny" ran out and his Halifax was shot down. After his escape from Stalag Luft III, he was recaptured 67 km away near Gorlitz, then murdered aged 22 by the two main executioners of the saga.

    There is a story in the family about how Granddads older Brother was the first man killed in the Pacific theatre. He`d been training Fijians in Guard Duty, Friend or Foe Identification.

    eg. 1] "halt, who goes there?"
    2] Repeat step 1.
    3] Overhead warning shot.
    4] Repeat step 1.
    5] Shoot to kill/wound/maim
    etc.

    Apparently one night he was doing a picket line inspection (or returning drunk from town, (depending which auntie is telling the story and who the audience is! :rolleyes:) and the Fijian on Duty went straight to step 5. No more Great-Uncle.

    Really should try and confirm this story before all the people with firsthand knowledge pass on.

    (Man in photo is Porokohu Patapu Pohe)
     

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  6. iwilc2

    iwilc2 Member

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    No pics, but my Uncle spent 3 years Island Hopping as he called it, was in Three Invasions, Marianas, Leytte, Okinowa, Was in the 24th Corps, He was on Okinowa when he found out his younger brother that was in the 89th "The Rolling W" was killed just about 1 month befor Germany surrendered. Dad was in the Navy in the Atlantic, Dads brother was all over Europe for 4 years. All are gone now. R I P Gentlemen


    Len
     
  7. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    "...helped feed the 5" guns, 20mm, and depth charges..." Geezuz! Busy lad.
    My da was RCEME attached to an Armoured unit. He died before I was old enough to ask him anything. One uncle in each Service, including one who was too old to go overseas. More than likely what was known as a 'Zombie' up here. The Canadian Army in Europe were entirely volunteers until very late in the War. PBI units were grossly under manned. Other troopies(AA, Arty, etc) got 2 weeks PBI training and were re-assigned. Most of 'em died, of course. All so our idiot government, of the time, wouldn't have to deal with conscription(draft) in Quebec.
    Ma never understood my interest in the history of W.W. II.
     
  8. C-grunt

    C-grunt Member

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    Both my grandads were in.

    One was an Army Air Corp military police and was stationed somewhere around India on a bomber base. He came home after a building collapsed on him during a hurricane and severely broke his leg.

    My other grandad was an engineer with the Marines on several of the islands. Its hard to get info from him as he is all but deaf. He has some pics of being straffed by the Zeros.

    He was injured in an artillery accident. He was walking along a small tree line and didnt know an artillery battery was on the other side. They began firing and the concussion of the blast really messed him up, hence the deafness.

    My mom has been trying to get the pics for a long time. Ill ask her about them.
     
  9. 61chalk

    61chalk Member

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    Sunray..post 32...ya he was a busy lad...I think they trained a little
    bit on everything, at least he learned, probably just in case someone
    got killed someone else could jump in..at least thats my opnion...the "lad"
    part is so very true...my Dad ran away from home all the time, then 3 times
    he lied about his age, he was only 16, he changed his birthdate, after the
    3rd time coming back the Navy recruiter gave in an said if you want to die
    that bad, ok...every year he would remind us of his second birthday, I always
    thought he was lying..until he got his papers out an showed me.
     
  10. Webbj0219

    Webbj0219 Member

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    Nice pics, guys. Especially the one 61Chalk posted in the begining of the thread. That gun on top of the scarf has got to be the prettiest Ive ever seen. The woodgrain is like tiger stripes. Had to try not to drewl on my keyboard.
     
  11. 71Commander

    71Commander Member

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    What a great thread. I'm in awe.
     
  12. Sisco

    Sisco Member

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    My Dad was on a troop transport headed to the Philippines when the war ended. One happy boat full of guy until they got there and found out there were a lot of Japanese up in the hills who hadn't gotten the word yet, so they had to find 'em and convince them the war was over and they lost.

    dad.jpg
     
  13. jfh

    jfh Member.

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    Natural father: b.1895; served in WWI as a tank gunner--the platoon / company commander was Dwight D. Eisenhower. Did not leave the US.

    Stepfather: b. 1895; served in WWI as a pilot. Flew Sopwith Camels in England, but never flew in combat.

    Jim H.
     
  14. rocky branch

    rocky branch Member

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    My uncle was a Seabee on Guadalcanal and other vacation spots.

    My dad toured Europe with the 506th PIR.

    I did two tours SF in RVN.

    Dad rear middle.
     

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  15. JohnnyOrygun

    JohnnyOrygun Member

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    My Uncle Ollie

    My Uncle Ollie who served on a PT Boat in the Pacific during World War II, his boat was the victim of a friendly fire event and he was blown off the stern of his boat... literally out of his shoes. He is the last living sibling from my Fathers Family. His Brother Lynn also served in the Pacific in the Army, but I know nothing of his service. According to my Dad the War totally changed him, before the War he was outgoing and very gregarious... but after the War, he was withdrawn and made his living as a migrant farm labor.

    uncle%20ollie%20and%20chopper.jpg

    Here is a link to a story the local paper did on him last year, http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090823/NEWS/908230325

    We are truly losing "The Greatest Generation", they survived The Great Depression, The Dust Bowl and of course World War II. We owe them all a great debt of gratitude. Alas, the current generation does not quite measure up to the standard set by The Greatest Generation.
     
  16. BIGRETIC

    BIGRETIC Member

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    I have to say...Thank GOD for all.They are not honored enough.Truly the Greatest Generation.
     
  17. Jubjub

    Jubjub Member

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    My dad joined the Army Air Corps in 1942, and retired from the Air Force for the second time in 1969. He was initially in pilot training, but washed out due to vertigo in the instrument flying part, and never left the States during WWII. He got around a lot during the cold war, but in the course of a 25 year military career, never heard a shot fired in anger. He did see a few nukes light off, but that was pretty par for the course.

    dad2.jpg
     
  18. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    Uncle ''Hut''
    Albert L. Hutson, Jr.
    SMA '41 As a young second lieutenant in World War II he served with the First Armored Division in the Italian Campaign, starting with the Battle of Anzio, and participated in the liberation of Rome. During combat in the Po Valley he sustained a wound for which he received the Purple Heart. Col. Hutson served in the U.S. Army for 32 years, earning the Combat Infantryman's Badge for service in World II and Vietnam. He was awarded the Silver Star during the Vietnam War, where he served from1967 to1968 as a battalion commander and acting brigade commander of the First Air Cavalry Division. After retiring from the Army, he pursued a career as a figurative artist in San Francisco. In honor of his artistic achievements, San Francisco Mayor Frank Jordan declared his seventieth birthday, March 11, 1993, Col. Albert Hutson Day.
     
  19. Travis McGee

    Travis McGee Member

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    I highly recommend Private Leckie's superb short biography "Helmet for my Pillow" about his experiences in Parris Island, Guadalcanal, Australia, New Britain and Pelilu. He is one of the main "characters" in "The Pacific" and his book is a primary source. It's under 300 pages and one of THE best war stories I have EVER read, and I have read 100s. It's in your local library gathering dust. Read it, you will be GLAD you did!
     
  20. FMJMIKE

    FMJMIKE Member

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    My father was a mechanic on the USS Torsk. That's the sub with the sharks teeth painted on it. His sub sank the last Japanese ship of WW II. He also endured a depth charge attack in Tokyo Harbor. Here he is when he first entered the Navy....
    GNMNAVY1.jpg
    His Sub which is on display in Baltimore Harbor........
    torsk1.jpg
    And at sea.............
    USSTORSKSS423.jpg
    We could be twins we look so much alike. George Norris McCauley.....May he rest in peace.
     
  21. Carl N. Brown

    Carl N. Brown Member

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    With all the focus on Marines in The Pacific, I would like to point out that US Army was also involved.

    My father joined up before Pearl Harbor, was trained in desert warfare in California, shipped out with the Sixth Army Division to fight in the jungle in New Guinea and the Phillipines, and was in hospital with gunshot wound when the war ended.

    The guys in Luzon were kept there to "unwind"--they didn't call it PTSD but they did not do like in VietNam: ship troops around like so many spare parts in McNamara's Ford factory. They did realize they were human beings, and 260 days in combat on Luzon would do things to a man's head.

    Dad was squad automatic rifleman. He would use a M1 Garand if a BAR was not available. He had a low opinion of the Carbine, Tommy gun and .45 pistol. If it would not shot through a coconut tree at 100 yards it was useless.

    [​IMG]
     

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  22. 61chalk

    61chalk Member

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    I never knew they sent Western Unions to inform of being wounded,
    always thought it was when they were killed.....that had to of been
    scary to open...."The Garand, turning cover into only concealment."
     
  23. Carl N. Brown

    Carl N. Brown Member

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    IIRC, it was customary to send a person to inform of a death.
     
  24. alexanderplatz

    alexanderplatz Member

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    The only relative that I know of who served in the Pacific in WWII was a distant relative on my mother's side, Captain Benjamin Kysor, MD. He was a U.S. Army physician who was killed in the Phillipines by Japanese bombardment in December 1941. His death was described in a Time magazine article dated Jan. 26, 1942:

    He was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, and a battery of 155mm coastal guns was renamed Battery Kysor in his honor. It seems to be the one battery at Corregidor that is not pictured at this site on Corregidor, but below is what I think is a representative photo of that particular piece. No pictures of the man, sorry. Never got to know him.

    155mm_GPF_Garden_Island_WA_1943_AWM_054026.jpg
     
  25. chuck520

    chuck520 Member

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    Both of my grandfathers were in WW2.
    Both were in the Army.
    My maternal gf was a truck driver in France.
    My other gf was a tanker. He was on the docks in Oakland getting ready to ship to Japan for an invasion when the atomic bombs were dropped.
    I thank all the above men for giving me an opportunity to live a good life.
    May they all rest in peace.
     
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