Quantcast

Heaviest weight for ccw

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by 357smallbore, Aug 31, 2020.

  1. herrwalther

    herrwalther Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2013
    Messages:
    5,661
    My lightweight 1911 weighs 40.25oz loaded and a spare magazine. That is about the heaviest I go for carry right now. And I don't carry the 1911 often. By comparison, my typical carry double stack 9mm with a light and red dot is 35.6oz loaded weight.
     
  2. Rexster

    Rexster Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2007
    Messages:
    3,341
    Location:
    SE Texas
    Total weight is not the entire equation. Weight distribution is important, as too much weight concentrated in the grip, or at the rear of the pistol, can produce a outward-leaning tendency, and/or a pendulum effect, especially when using a “high-ride” type of holster.

    I have no problem carrying a 4” full-lug GP100, or a 5” all-steel 1911, each of which weighs more than 40 ounces, IIRC, before one adds the weight of ammo and, in the case of the 1911, the magazine. This assumes a decently stiff belt, and a holster that is stable, on the belt. I do not always pack this heavy, but, I appreciate the handling qualities of full-sized weapons, and, recoil has become the nemesis of my aging hands, so, medium-frame revolvers, and full-sized 1911 pistols, are much more tolerable to shoot than most compact handguns. So, it is just as well that I do not mind toting the weight of a duty/service type of weapon.

    I will, of course, eventually feel the weight of a 4” full-lug GP100 sooner than the weight of a 3” GP100, or a 2-3/4” or 4” Speed Six. A 4” GP100 represents a “would willingly carry” maximum, rather than an everyday-carry revolver.

    My long-stroke DA trigger skill is less-perishable than my 19-Eleven-ing skill, and FAR less-perishable than my Glocking skill. Two members of our household are in highly-vulnerable categories, in this pandemic, so, my shooting has been curtailed, to reduce the likelihood of bringing home something tragically unwelcome. The result of all of this is that I find medium-frame revolvers comfortable, and comforting. When I can again train as much as I would like, the 1911, and probably the Glock G19x/G45 and G17, will re-join the line-up.

    I like holsters with one tunnel loop, and one outboard loop. The earliest example, of which I am aware, is the Bruce Nelson Professional. Milt Sparks lists the BN-55, and it is no coincidence that “BN” are the late Bruce Nelson’s initials. Josh Bulman’s Forward Drop Scabbard is my favorite interpretation of this general type of scabbard/holster, for the 1911. Milt Sparks’ PMK is another rig of this general type, which I love for concealing revolvers.

    A 4” or 5” barrel helps stabilize a weapon, while it is being carried, but, a shorter barrel clears leather quicker, especially if carrying inside the trousers, so, I like 2” to 3” revolvers, too.
     
    bannockburn likes this.
  3. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2006
    Messages:
    13,010
    Location:
    In a part of Utah that resembles Tattooine.
    I haven't weighed them, but I bet my double-stack 1911s (I have one in .45 and one in 9mm) probably weigh north of 50 oz with a spare magazine.

    I see a lot of people talk about weight and comfort, and I guess I just started young carrying whatever I wanted to carry and working around it. I have mostly carried full-size guns, (I had a Para P-12 for a while) and mostly steel or alloy frames (I did have a G-22 for several years.) I just kept wishing they were 1911s. When I carry, I never think to myself; "Man, this gun is just too dang heavy!"

    I think a lot of comfort is relative. If you take someone who loathes everything about guns, and have them try on a slim, compact 9mm in a IWB holster, they will say they hate it, is feels like a steel tumor and they want to get rid of it. But if you take a kid who has been jonsesing for a carry permit since he was 12, and you hang a 6" Model 29 in a shoulder holster under his left arm, he will say he doesn't even feel it, he can do this all day, every day. I think a lot of it lies in your idea of what's comfortable or not.
     
    pairof44sp and labnoti like this.
  4. DR505

    DR505 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2009
    Messages:
    196
    Location:
    Idaho
    A 3” 657 in .41 mag, a full size 1911, or a Glock 21. Don’t know the weight, I just like the firearms.
     
  5. jeepnik

    jeepnik Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2011
    Messages:
    2,226
    Location:
    SoCal
    Of interesting note. I see/hear folks wanting to carry the lightest possible handgun. Then they either shoot poorly at the range or shoot other firearms than what they carry. You don't magically become a wonderful marksman when the pressure is on. You will likely shoot worse.

    None of the above is new. But those are just two of the reasons I prefer steel over plastic. The one handgun that I shoot best is the 1911A1. While I admit from time to time I will carry some strange handguns most usually it will be either a full size or Commander size 1911A1.
     
    Stophel and Rexster like this.
  6. Ironicaintit

    Ironicaintit Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,820
    Location:
    Colorado
    I carry a browning HiPower, which weighs about 2.2lbs loaded, along with a spare mag on my weak side. It carries well, and I don’t hardly notice it.
    I carried a para ordnance p14 for a minute, and that’s just too much pistol to be practical
     
    Rexster likes this.
  7. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    22,195
    In a 9mm. the heaviest pistol I conceal carry is a Browning Hi-Power at 2.2 lbs. Lightest one is a Kahr CM9 at 14 oz. Most of the rest are between 24 to 32 oz.

    In a .45 the heaviest is a Colt Combat Commander at 33 oz.

    In a revolver it's going to be my S&W Model 649 weighing in at 24 oz.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2020
    Rexster likes this.
  8. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    22,195
    Some other 'heavyweight" handguns I have lugged around:

    1) Colt Government at 39 oz.
    2) Astra Model 600 at 38.4 oz.
    3) S&W Model 686 at 42 oz.
    4) Ruger Speed Six at 33.5 oz.
     
  9. Kevin Rohrer

    Kevin Rohrer Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Messages:
    1,212
    Location:
    Medina, Ohio USA
    Anything I want to carry that conceals under a shirt or coat.

    When you have carried something belt-fed for a living, weight is only a consideration for lesser mortals.
     
  10. peacemaker45

    peacemaker45 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2003
    Messages:
    1,326
    Location:
    Alger, OH
    I carried a 5" 1911 for a long time. Now it's a steel frame commander, but that's more because the shorter gun doesn't pinch the cheek like your least favorite maiden aunt when you sit down, than about the weight.
     
    Rexster likes this.
  11. Howland937

    Howland937 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2020
    Messages:
    917
    Location:
    South central Ohio
    Either a 5" Kimber-ish 38 Super or Sig UC .45. I use the same DeSantis IWB holster for both and weight isn't an issue. Only time either are bothersome is if I've got to get to something under or behind an automotive dashboard and I'm laying on it.

    Anchored in the 4 o'clock position with no room to sag or flop around, I don't even feel it throughout a normal day.
     
  12. DRJ1911

    DRJ1911 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Messages:
    36
    Around 30oz but I prefer around 20oz. Getting old is no joke.
     
  13. BCC1

    BCC1 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2019
    Messages:
    56
    Like many who compete locally, I can shoot multiple targets effectively, while moving, using a heavy, long barreled handgun. And in competition, I like high capacity magazines.

    For practice, I’ve gone through similar routines with lighter, lower capacity hand guns, until my proficiency is pretty good.

    When I carry, it’s often a Kahr Pm9 in a pocket holster. If I’m carrying on a belt, it’s usually either a Sig X-Carry or a STI Staccato C Duo. No spare mag.

    I’m tall and fit and could easily conceal carry something larger and with a higher capacity. And occasionally will, just because I feel like it. But frankly, proficiency is much, much more important than extra rounds or weight.
     
    JR24 likes this.
  14. Stophel

    Stophel Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2009
    Messages:
    698
    Location:
    Kentucky
    I agree. A lot of people want everything as light as they can possibly get it. (I see lots of people today complain how an ordinary pocket knife is "too heavy" for them to carry.... egad). Well light can be fine, but light can be hard to shoot well. I saw the other day that there is an ultra lightweight S&W Scandium .44 magnum.... um... I kind of find it hard to believe that there's very many people out there that could ever shoot such a thing very well.

    I can't shoot a Chief's Special nearly as well as I can a .38 Combat Masterpiece. Or a 1911. Or a Model 27 .357. It's just too small. The larger guns have a huge advantage for me, as I can dot an "i" pretty easily all day long with a .45, but hitting a pie pan at ten yards can be more challenging for me with an itty bitty snubby. If you want to carry something lightweight, you should practice with it. If you can shoot well with it, great, but if not, you might be better off if you thought about trying a bigger, heavier gun.
     
    StrawHat likes this.
  15. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    20,037
    Location:
    Deep in the Ozarks
    I carry a full-size M1911 in a tuckable holster of my own design. It's very comfortable.
     
  16. 375supermag

    375supermag Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2013
    Messages:
    1,024
    Location:
    Southcentral Pennsylvania
    Hi...
    I carry a full size Springfield Armory 1911 in .45ACP. I have carried it for decades...it is reliable and accurate with enough power to do it's job. No idea what it weighs... don't care either. I have supreme confidence in the gun and cartridge.
    Sometimes I carry a Colt Commander in .45ACP for the very same reasons.
    Doesn't matter what it weighs either.
     
  17. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    16,167
    Location:
    DFW Area
    As the gun gets heavier, the belt and holster quality and design become more and more important. With a good belt that is wide and stiff, and a good solid holster with loops well-matched to the belt size and designed so that it doesn't shift around on the belt, you can go heavier than with a narrow belt that is flexible and a poorly designed holster with loops that are too large for the belt.

    That said, if you change the gun weight a lot, you're going to notice it, even if you do get really good gear to try to offset some of the weight.
     
  18. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    20,037
    Location:
    Deep in the Ozarks
    The more you wear it, the more comfortable it gets. I don't even notice my .45.
     
  19. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    16,167
    Location:
    DFW Area
    Unless it doesn't. If one is compensating for a poor belt and holster by wearing the belt too tight to try to keep the gun from sagging/shifting, it can cause issues that get worse over time.

    Even with good gear, some people can develop problems from hanging a significant amount of weight off a belt, particularly as they get older.

    1. Get good gear.
    2. Be aware that not all people are the same and pay attention to how your body reacts. If you find that you're having issues that align with the symptoms that some people experience from wearing a belt that is too tight then you might consider going to a lighter gun.

    I'm not endorsing all the content of these links, just providing them to demonstrate that there are people who end up with back pain, or other issues from carrying firearms that can be remedied, in some cases, by going to a lighter/smaller firearm--although other solutions are discussed.

    https://gunmagnetworld.com/how-to-reduce-concealed-carry-back-pain/
    https://www.nrafamily.org/articles/2019/1/11/physical-therapists-ccw-advice-strong-side-hip-carry/
    https://www.thehighroad.org/index.php?threads/carrying-concealed-with-back-pain-need-help.574608/
    https://www.defensivecarry.com/threads/ccw-and-back-pain.6890/
     
    JR24 likes this.
  20. SharpDog

    SharpDog Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    Messages:
    2,453
    Location:
    Tennessee
    My p226 or p229 which are 29 oz. - 32 oz. unloaded. I shoot them much better than my EDC which is now a p365 (concealed) or p365 XL OWB which are lighter.

    I basically can hit a hardball regularly at 10 yds with the heavier p22x and a softball with the p365's

    (In case I get attacked by any ball players I'm set).
     
  21. Zendude

    Zendude Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,382
    Location:
    Texas
    I can carry my Ruger American compact (29 oz unloaded) iwb without much trouble when wearing my Bigfoot steel core gun belt. Something around 20 oz is what I prefer though.
     
  22. Phaedrus/69

    Phaedrus/69 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,756
    Location:
    Big Sky Country
    This is an underrated comment! With a good holster & belt the weight of most common sidearms isn't a huge factor. Yeah, if you're a gram weenie hiking the AT for two months then every ounce is important. But in the course of a day I hardly notice the weight of my HK P2000 riding in a Red Nichols Sirocco on my Armour Belt.
     
    bikerdoc likes this.
  23. Ernie Bass

    Ernie Bass Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2019
    Messages:
    1,065
    Location:
    No Town N.C.
    If you wear any heavy firearm, no matter what the quality of the gear, your body will take notice one way or the other. Each step you take is a pounding. Ounces matter. Back muscles pull and cause a imbalance. Not noticeable at first but accumulative if carried out for long periods of time. Especially of concern if one leg or hip is shorter than the other. Weight is Weight. The heavier the weight the more chances of spinal injury in one form or another.
     
    JR24 and JohnKSa like this.
  24. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    20,037
    Location:
    Deep in the Ozarks
    Or you'll just get stronger.
     
    Stophel likes this.
  25. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    16,167
    Location:
    DFW Area
    It is possible an exercise regimen or physical therapy could help with the issue. Just continuing to wear a carry rig that's causing problems is more likely to cause the problems to get worse, not better.
     
    JR24 likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice